A Burst of Fun with the HTC One X

, posted: 4-May-2012 14:58

Recently I took the family to Rainbows End, which proved a fertile ground for testing the camera capabilities of the HTC One X. It comes packed with an 8 megapixel rear facing camera with autofocus, flash, and a sensor specifically designed to take great photos in low light situations. It also has a 1.3 megapixel front facing camera, but this blog post will be concentrating on the former.

In addition to the hardware, the camera software has many features to aid in immortalizing those treasured memories. One of these features is its burst mode. This allows you to take multiple photos in quick succession, and then choose which one is the best photo. This makes it a cinch to take a great photo in fast moving action scenarios. The photo below was taken using Burst mode, which allowed me to capture my kids as they zoomed past on one of the rides. Using a more traditional method of operating the camera, this would’ve been difficult at best.



While this is a handy feature, it can cause complications when you import the photos from your phone. On the HTC One’s storage media, standard images are located in /DCIM/100MEDIA, with Burst mode photos located under /DCIM/100BURST. If you use software such as iPhoto to automate the import process, it may only detect the first directory when looking for photos to import.

If you are importing the files manually using a file management utility like Finder in OSX, or Windows Explorer, you should be aware that Burst mode photos have each photo set in their own directory, with each set having the first file name starting from IMAG0001.jpg. If you like to keep all your photos in a single directory on your computer, there may be file name clashes that you have to cater for.

The photo app also includes tools which allow you to perform basic editing functions, such as cropping or rotating images.



Image editing is a non-destructive operation, with the edited file saved alongside the original image. This means you can tweak your photos to your hearts content, without worrying about the effects this has on the source image. I was also pleasantly surprised at how much I could crop a photo, and yet still have relatively acceptable resolution, as the below image shows.



In addition to the editing tools, it is also possible to apply effects to the photos after they have been taken. In addition to changing the overall style of the photo, it also allows you to adjust things such as exposure and contrast.



It also offers an Auto enhance option to attempt to bring out the best in the photos you take. As with most algorithm based enhancements, the results can be a bit hit and miss, but it can often prove to be a pretty useful tool to clean up photos after they’ve been taken.



It is also possible to apply some effects when a photo is initially taken. These cover a wide variety of effects, such as taking sepia tone images, or applying an aged effect to your photos.

Another handy feature is the ability to take a series of photos which will then be automatically stitched together to create a panorama. The software will guide you through this process, with a green rectangle indicating when the next shot is correctly positioned. While it doesn’t appear to take full 360 degree panoramas, it is still useful to create wide stretching views that a single photo cannot do justice to.



All in all, I was very impressed with the quality of the photos that the HTC One X took, and also appreciated the many features the camera software offered. With this phone in my pocket, I don’t have the need to carry a dedicated camera along with me.

About the author

Hi I'm David, a self employed software developer on the wrong side of 40, residing in Auckland with my wife and two children. I am a passionate All Blacks and Blues fan, gadget junkie, mature aged gamer, and connoisseur of fine heavy metal (and music in general). I currently own an iPhone 4, but am very open to trying new technologies, and can't wait to see what the best of Android can bring to the smartphone table. I enjoy keeping up to date with the latest technological advances in general, and am encouraged to see that the smartphone market is no longer an iOneHorseRace. I’m very interested to see how the HTC One and Ice Cream Sandwich fares in this regard.

Other related posts:
HTC One X: Bring on the Games!
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HTC One X Movie Editor






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