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BrydgeAir iPad keyboard review
Posted on 24-Jan-2016 13:44 by Bill Bennett. | Tags Filed under: News.


Brydge has a keyboard for anyone who bought an iPad Air or Air 2 but meant to buy a MacBook Air.

The BrydgeAir keyboard is a sturdy aluminium frame that clips to the iPad Air. When closed it forms a tough laptop-like shell. When open you can use the hinge at any angle, just like a laptop. Folding it flat will put your iPad to sleep.

At around NZ$230, it isnít cheap. Decent iPad keyboards start at less than half the price.

Tablet or faux laptop?

Yet BrydgeAir isn’t like any other third-party iPad keyboard Iíve seen. While popular iPad keyboards like Logitechís excellent Ultrathin Keyboard Cover are all about adding the convenience of keyboard typing to the iPad, BrydgeAir is more about turning the iPad into an iOS touch-screen laptop.

If that’s what you want to do.

Brydgeís design and choice of materials reinforces this idea. The case is aluminium, you can choose colours to match your iPad Air. The keyboard is exactly the same dimensions as the iPad Air. When closed, an iPad with the BridgeAir looks a lot like an Apple laptop.

It uses hinges engineered to fit an iPad Air 2. The same unit works with the older iPad Air thanks to rubber shims that you can add to the hinges.

Heavy

The downside of this approach is the BrydgeAir adds more weight than, say, the Logitech Ultrathin keyboard. The keyboard is heavier than the iPad Air 2 and getting on for twice the weight of the Logitech keyboard. That extra weight may be a Brydge too far for some people.

On a positive note, the BrydgeAir keyboard is a lot like a MacBook keyboard. Itís solid and doesnít flex like some cheaper laptop keyboards. It can take my touch typist hammering, thereís a little more travel than in most attachable keyboards. It has back-lighting, thatís important for us journalists who find ourselves typing in darkened rooms.

I found typing cramped compared with my laptop – thatís unavoidable given the keyboard size matches the 10-inch iPad Air 2.

Itís fine to use, but Iíd prefer a little more room. I find I can work with it for a while. It’s good enough for temporary typing on the move. It may even do if I am†out-of-town on a reporting assignment.

In the long-term I wouldnít want to drop my laptop for this arrangement and thatís before discussing the merits of iOS versus OS X.

Beyond keyboard

Thereís more than just a keyboard. Bridge has added Bluetooth stereo speakers. You can crank them up higher than the normal iPad Air speaker. While the BrydgeAir speakers are useful for FaceTime conversations, music sounds cheap and tinny.

One other thing to watch for is that the BridgeAir takes a toll on your iPad batteries. I can go all day and then some on my iPad without the BrydgeAir, with it attached Iíd lose about a third of that battery life.

Iíve always thought thereís something curious about iPad keyboards. When the iPad first appeared it was a break with personal computingís recent past. Apple stripped down the laptop to the bare essentials needed for browsing and reading. That meant getting rid of the keyboard. We seem to have spent the last five years putting them back.

This trend reached its apex when Apple added its own keyboard cover to the iPad Pro. I prefer the BrydgeAir to Apple’s keyboard and would love to see what Brydge can do for the iPad Pro. Adding a keyboard of this quality could elevate the Pro.

Verdict

Brydge has chosen to target a tight niche with a well-engineered, high-quality alternative. The BrydgeAir is an expensive, heavy, well-made †keyboard for a device that was designed as†only an occasional typing tool. It changes the nature of that tool. In a sense it’s a good fix for a problem you don’t need to have.

If you are a heavy-duty typist a lot you would be†better off with a MacBook, MacBook Air or just about any other laptop. A device made for typing is always better than an iPad and a keyboard.

If you love the iPad, need to type a bit and like the idea of an iOS laptop , this is the answer. If you bust your budget buying an iPad and wished you got a laptop instead, you’ll love this. Itís also a good alternative for people who find plastic type covers too flimsy.


Filed under: Apple, Mobile, Review Tagged: IOS, ipad, word processor



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