Get a mop and wipe it up!


Powershop Marketing promotes mass murderer

, posted: 5-Jun-2011 12:13

Che Guevara (born "Ernesto Lynch") was a Stalinist mass-murderer, but only in real life.

Che was a narcissist who boasted that “I have no house, wife, children, parents, or brothers; my friends are friends as long as they think like me, politically.”
Yet, this mercenary is the icon that Powershop uses to promote itself.

Powershop marketing image

Why not go the whole hog and use images of Stalin? Or Hitler?

Or both?

Stalin and Hitler
It seems ironic that Powershop, a company presumably in business to make a profit, should use an image associated with anti-capitalism. If Powershop were to go bust, then all that money that I've paid in advance for future power will be squandered, and Powershop's name will be in the mud (with Bridgecorp and Hanover Finance) in the eyes of its customers.

So, what do you stand for, Powershop?




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Comment by hellonearthisman, on 5-Jun-2011 14:08

LOL


Comment by hellonearthisman, on 5-Jun-2011 14:11

His stylized visage has become a ubiquitous countercultural symbol of rebellion. Which is what Powershop is compared to the other power companies.
The branding is no worse than Mitsubishi, IBM or Coke.


Author's note by dmw, on 5-Jun-2011 15:58

They could've achieved the same message with a less blood-stained choice of "counter-culture icon".

Who is their target market?

If they want to limit their customers to ex- or wannabe-hippies, or disciples of John Minto, or members of Greenpeace, then sure... use Che's picture. Thousands do (in ignorance).

But I thought Pwershop were aiming a bit higher and wider and smarter than that.


Comment by johnr, on 5-Jun-2011 16:43

Don't you have anything else better to do?


Comment by Chris, on 5-Jun-2011 16:53

Powershop posted the "How about a nice cup of shut the f*** up" picture on their Facebook profile a few months ago, in response to a heated business-customer discussion (can't remember what about).

They thought it would be taken light-heartedly... nope.

Using Che doesn't surprise me. They want to fit in and come across as hip and savvy, but perhaps they aren't the best at choosing which pop culture references to use.


Comment by 1080p, on 5-Jun-2011 20:21

I suppose if we were to do a little investigation we would find many companies making use of icons and imagery not necessarily free from controversy. Making use of icons or images from history in new and humourous ways is something associated with pop culture and always will be. Drawing links between Powershop and Che's ideology in this instance is absurd.

I am tired of the psuedo-intellect shown in this blog post; I see it all over the internet and even print media now. There isn't any need to drag up the facts about Che's life and infer a completely nonexistant link between him and the policy decisions made by Powershop.

Why would Powershop; assuming for absurdity's sake, that they did like what Che stood for, then "...go the whole hog..." and use an image of Hitler? The ideologies were completely different. They wod be at odds with one another.


Author's note by dmw, on 5-Jun-2011 20:39

I don't care about controversial icons or imagery used by other companies, unless I'm an enthusiastic customer of such a company.

In other words, it is because I LIKE and recommend Powershop that I get so annoyed by their PR department's choice of imagery.

Companies associate themselves with images for a reason. And, as Tiger Woods and Wayne Rooney found out, they dissociate themselves if that image is tarnished. Company and imagery are linked.

My contention is that Ernesto Guevara (despite the popular mythology) has a tarnished image.


Comment by kiwitrc, on 6-Jun-2011 07:13

Totally get where you are coming from!

I stopped supporting the Salvation Army once I recognised the single "S" on their collar is much the same as the double "S" used by the Nazi SS. I realise that its half the number of "S"s but half as evil is still pretty evil, right?

Don't get me started on the Red Cross and the Crusades.


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David White
Auckland
New Zealand


Goon fan, .NET developer, contrarian seeker of truth