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  Reply # 633228 31-May-2012 11:09 Send private message

Seems typical of Orcon experiences.

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  Reply # 633267 31-May-2012 11:50 Send private message

raytaylor: 

I honestly think if its a secure location, and the chorus service is tested to that location (just like an ADSL test at your ETP) then they should install it to that location. Anything behind that is not the responsibility of chorus.

Just because the ONT is installed on the side of a house vs another structure shouldnt make any difference.
For example. I have a radio network using radio towers around hawkes bay for my rural broadband service. I plan on placing some roadside cabinets around the district soon with small telegraph poles next to them for radio transmitters - exactly like cellphone towers but on a smaller scale and size. Or exactly like the telecom CMAR systems currently in place.

As far as chorus are concerned, they install the fibre to the point where I want. If i run it over ethernet to a house or up a pole to a radio transmitter its still none of their business. Just like they do with vodafone cellphone towers, PCM pedestals or DSL cabinets. 

So if i want it installed into a pedestal box at the end of my driveway, instead of a man sized cabinet, then they should be able to do that.

If the next home owner wants to have the fibre installed up to the house, then they can pay for it.


You're looking at apples and oranges here. One is a mass market residential infrastructure deployment, the other is a business deployment to an ISP. They are not directly comparable IMO.


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  Reply # 633473 31-May-2012 14:49 Send private message

networkn: I guess it would depend on latency requirements. I doubt they would be happy to skype HD, VOIP or game on a 4G Connection


Agreed. 

This whole issue is really just going to be a process that gets worked though I think.  I think that VDSL is going to be a bit the same.

At present the core networks won't keep up with to many 100 mbit tails on them, so no one is going to be rushing to discount service connections and will sit back and be happy with the early adopters to pay the money, as Neil pointed out earlier.

We don't even have 4G yet, so speculation is all a bit moot.  We really don't know what it's going to perform like.

I think some of Neils comments are the most interesting and I think we all have to get really really focused on the reality that Telecom and Chorus are no longer the same.  If I understand it correctly, VDSL is a Chorus product and Chorus own the ports that Telecom is selling (at present). 

ULL pricing and VDSL port pricing is going to be interesting and what Telecom decides it wants to do.

If Chorus VDSL port pricing is above what Telecom feels it can put its own DSLAMs in for then things might get really interesting.

If the VDSL port price and ULL price is lower than the fibre tail cost that everyone has to pay then I can see VDSL becoming even more interesting.

Neil also made a comment about only being 400m from his cabinet.  To me, the smart thing to do for Chorus would be to push the fibre to homes that are pasted the 500m space first, though I do get how silly that sounds as iirc the fibre is all going to be feed from those cabinets, so their may be no choice.

But from an uptake point of view, it's likely to be those who are further away from the cabinet, that can't get 50mbit VDSL who are going to be interested first.

It's also going to be those who are on old copper that won't carry VDSL who will be interested obviously.

However, what speed with VDSL actually do?  Can they push this stuff past 100mbit?

That's going to be the real question, when the core catches up to the point where people all want 100mbit services because a web page takes to long otherwise with out it.  I do know how silly that currently sounds as well, but we have to reflect back to when we were all on dial up and moved to DSL.  At first it just seemed a bit pointless.  No one built web pages that got that much benefit from DSL.  12 months later the whinging started that even the most basic sites were just rubbish if you didn't have 128k DSL.

So while Neil is supper happy right now with his ADSL2+ 18/.9, I suspect that is going to change within 3 years with 50 and 100mbit services pushing in.






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  Reply # 635481 4-Jun-2012 15:00 Send private message

rayonline: I read a article that some of the parties are not sure who would foot the bill to get the cables to your house.  Has anyone gone fibre yet and can give some rough estimate on the prices?  Just your normal suburban house beside the road, Auckland, Christchurch, Wellington etc ...

We have just been given a pamphlet by Orcon that is about it.  They just said that they had to send out a enginner to give us a price. 

If people go with fibre can they go back to copper wire?  If we move out, the parents don't use computers. 

I'm guessing it might be XXXX charges to get it to the house, then maybe up to $400 for other jobs and to re-route the RJ11 phones back into a IP ATA(s). 



Cheers.


The residential connection is apparently free to customers in the Ultrafast Fibre regions...

http://www.ultrafastbroadband.co.nz/

How do you go about getting connected? We will provide fibre right up to your premises, ending in a small, discreet box called an Optical Network Termination (ONT) unit which will normally be located somewhere central on your property. There is not expected to be any charge for residential connections.
They ran cable past my house the other week. Should hopefully get service sometime from October (my uneducated guess). 





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  Reply # 636994 6-Jun-2012 21:49 Send private message

Someone said (somewhere) that connecting is free if the house entry point is within 15m from the road.




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  Reply # 637071 7-Jun-2012 02:15 Send private message

webwat: Someone said (somewhere) that connecting is free if the house entry point is within 15m from the road.


Depends upon who your LFC is. Eg. in the ultrafast fibre areas (http://www.ultrafastbroadband.co.nz/), its pretty much free for all residential installs. In a Chorus area, its free within the ~15m from the road distance.
The LFC's negotiated their own terms with crown fibre holdings as to what they would offer.

LFC = your loco fibre co.




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  Reply # 637079 7-Jun-2012 06:21 Send private message

It's worth remembering that the "connection" is free. This doesn't mean that getting fibre connected to your house and then getting somebody to entirely rewire your house for free so that your phone and PC's will all be connected will be free.

Internal wiring is still a significant issue, and RSP's are't going to be able to absorb costs if people want custom installs.


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  Reply # 637315 7-Jun-2012 13:32 Send private message

raytaylor:
webwat: Someone said (somewhere) that connecting is free if the house entry point is within 15m from the road.


Depends upon who your LFC is. Eg. in the ultrafast fibre areas (http://www.ultrafastbroadband.co.nz/), its pretty much free for all residential installs. In a Chorus area, its free within the ~15m from the road distance.
The LFC's negotiated their own terms with crown fibre holdings as to what they would offer.

LFC = your loco fibre co.


Ultrafast is double span for aerial OR 30m for buried lead...  10m internal wiring

Refer to:
http://nztelco.com/?p=531

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