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Topic # 102709 20-May-2012 16:44 Send private message

Wondering if anyone has experience fixing minor stone chips on cars?

There are a few "systems" that allow you to DIY. Any recommendations?

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  Reply # 627974 20-May-2012 16:46 Send private message

Have you tried a good buff and polish?




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  Reply # 627976 20-May-2012 16:50 Send private message

Yeah, the paint has come off so I can see the base coat. Definitely not tar or dirt of any kind.

Ezy Touch Up (looks like it is a Malaysian online store) seems to have quite the solution looking at their YouTube clip.

Just wondering if there is anything like that I can get in NZ, or I may have to order from them.

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  Reply # 628007 20-May-2012 18:47 Send private message

I'd suggest going to your local automotive paint selling place ( http://www.spraystore.co.nz/ ), they can make you up a touch-up bottle, or rattle can with the appropriate colours, and give you the right advice as to how best to do it I'm sure.






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  Reply # 628012 20-May-2012 18:51 Send private message

sleemanj: I'd suggest going to your local automotive paint selling place ( http://www.spraystore.co.nz/ ), they can make you up a touch-up bottle, or rattle can with the appropriate colours, and give you the right advice as to how best to do it I'm sure.

+1

I need to do this too as my 1-year old VW Golf has some stone chips I'd like to hide.  Get one of the little bottles about the size of a woman's nail polish bottle with a wee brush attached to the lid.  Give it a good shake before applying, and use it very sparingly!  If you do put too much on, wipe it off very quickly with a rag because it goes hard very quickly.  A quick dab or two at each chip is preferable to trying to paint it on with long brush-strokes.







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  Reply # 628043 20-May-2012 20:06 Send private message

Thanks guys, getting the paint won't be the problem. I guess the process is to use something like a Q-tip or even toothpick to put the base coast on first, followed by the clear coat to give it that shine.

How would you guys level it down? Using 2000 grit sandpaper, or some rubbing compound?



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  Reply # 628064 20-May-2012 21:06 Send private message

OK for those that have done something like this, let me know how this sounds:

Before anything, clean the area thoroughly.

1. Dab base coats on.
2. Dab clear coats on with the clear coat's level being slightly higher than the original panel paint
3. Apply water to the (clean) surface where the scratch / chip is and sand with 2000-2500 grit sandpaper
4. Then use Turtle Wax Polishing Compound to get the shine back (ie. remove the effects of the sandpaper)

Have I missed anything?

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  Reply # 628167 21-May-2012 08:24 Send private message

heavenlywild: OK for those that have done something like this, let me know how this sounds:

Before anything, clean the area thoroughly.

1. Dab base coats on.
2. Dab clear coats on with the clear coat's level being slightly higher than the original panel paint
3. Apply water to the (clean) surface where the scratch / chip is and sand with 2000-2500 grit sandpaper
4. Then use Turtle Wax Polishing Compound to get the shine back (ie. remove the effects of the sandpaper)

Have I missed anything?

You don't need to worry about clear coat for covering touch-ups to stone chips.  Presumably, these stone chips are only small so you won't notice the lack of clear coat.

By using sandpaper, you are going to scratch a much larger area of clear coat than was originally affected by the stone chip.  If you scratch such a large area, you won't be able to hide it and will need to get the entire panel repainted.

After many years experience with this sort of thing, my advice would be as follows:

-  Touch up the stone chips as best you can with dabs of paint from the bottle
-  Don't leave it too long after stone chips appear, or rust may occur
-  After some years, the stone chips may get too many, so you may need to get the entire panel repainted
-  Or you may have sold the car by that time!







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  Reply # 628171 21-May-2012 08:33 Send private message

grant_k:
heavenlywild: OK for those that have done something like this, let me know how this sounds:

Before anything, clean the area thoroughly.

1. Dab base coats on.
2. Dab clear coats on with the clear coat's level being slightly higher than the original panel paint
3. Apply water to the (clean) surface where the scratch / chip is and sand with 2000-2500 grit sandpaper
4. Then use Turtle Wax Polishing Compound to get the shine back (ie. remove the effects of the sandpaper)

Have I missed anything?

You don't need to worry about clear coat for covering touch-ups to stone chips.  Presumably, these stone chips are only small so you won't notice the lack of clear coat.

By using sandpaper, you are going to scratch a much larger area of clear coat than was originally affected by the stone chip.  If you scratch such a large area, you won't be able to hide it and will need to get the entire panel repainted.

After many years experience with this sort of thing, my advice would be as follows:

-  Touch up the stone chips as best you can with dabs of paint from the bottle
-  Don't leave it too long after stone chips appear, or rust may occur
-  After some years, the stone chips may get too many, so you may need to get the entire panel repainted
-  Or you may have sold the car by that time!


Hi Grant,

Thanks for your advice. Looking at it, I don't think it's even chips at the moment, more like a minor dent in the clear coat. 

I am thinking of using just some clear coat to cover the little dent, then sanding it down. On YouTube I see you can use a cutting compound to make the area shiny again. Or is this not the case?

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  Reply # 628177 21-May-2012 08:44 Send private message

heavenlywild: I am thinking of using just some clear coat to cover the little dent, then sanding it down. On YouTube I see you can use a cutting compound to make the area shiny again. Or is this not the case?

Yes, cutting compound is good.  Definitely much better than sandpaper for what you want to do.  Sandpaper will leave deep scratches that are difficult to hide.

I use some stuff called "Minute Cut" and it's very good.  Use a soft rag, and be careful not to cover a larger area than necessary.







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  Reply # 628182 21-May-2012 08:58 Send private message

grant_k:
heavenlywild: I am thinking of using just some clear coat to cover the little dent, then sanding it down. On YouTube I see you can use a cutting compound to make the area shiny again. Or is this not the case?

Yes, cutting compound is good.  Definitely much better than sandpaper for what you want to do.  Sandpaper will leave deep scratches that are difficult to hide.

I use some stuff called "Minute Cut" and it's very good.  Use a soft rag, and be careful not to cover a larger area than necessary.


Hi Grant,

Where do you get Minute Cut from? I googled it but nothing came up. Perhaps something like that would be sufficient. If that fails then may need to go to the sandpaper (2500 grit) option. 

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  Reply # 628188 21-May-2012 09:06 Send private message

heavenlywild: Where do you get Minute Cut from? I googled it but nothing came up.

I've had it for a while and would have got it from Repco or SuperCheap Auto probably.  Anything similar should do.  I prefer a liquid cutting compound rather than paste, as the paste tends to go hard and gather dirt when you have the pot open.  With liquid, you spray it onto a cloth, or put the cloth over the top and tip the bottle upside down for a moment to get some onto the cloth.  It is easier to keep dirt out of liquid than with paste.







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  Reply # 628192 21-May-2012 09:16 Send private message

grant_k:
heavenlywild: Where do you get Minute Cut from? I googled it but nothing came up.

I've had it for a while and would have got it from Repco or SuperCheap Auto probably.  Anything similar should do.  I prefer a liquid cutting compound rather than paste, as the paste tends to go hard and gather dirt when you have the pot open.  With liquid, you spray it onto a cloth, or put the cloth over the top and tip the bottle upside down for a moment to get some onto the cloth.  It is easier to keep dirt out of liquid than with paste.


I haven't heard of a liquid cutting compound before. The only question is weather it is able to smooth out the clear coat.

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  Reply # 628207 21-May-2012 09:37 Send private message

grant_k: By using sandpaper, you are going to scratch a much larger area of clear coat than was originally affected by the stone chip.  If you scratch such a large area, you won't be able to hide it and will need to get the entire panel repainted. 


+1

Less is more in this case....

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  Reply # 628208 21-May-2012 09:42 Send private message

If your car insurance policy has glass cover just use that, won't touch your no claims bonus



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  Reply # 628210 21-May-2012 09:47 Send private message

DjShadow: If your car insurance policy has glass cover just use that, won't touch your no claims bonus




It's not glass though, it's panel?

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