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gjm



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Topic # 109769 26-Sep-2012 09:22 Send private message

anyone else standing by to do this. HR thought it would be a good idea if we did it so Im about to launch myself under my desk and see what stuff I can find that I thought was lost. Pretty sure there's some old 486's somewhere under there.

http://www.dropcoverholdon.org/




[Amstrad CPC 6128: 128k Memory: 3 inch floppy drive: Colour Screen]

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gjm



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  Reply # 691539 26-Sep-2012 09:28 Send private message

well that was anti-climatic, only thing under my desk was an old roses chocolate....carry on everyone.




[Amstrad CPC 6128: 128k Memory: 3 inch floppy drive: Colour Screen]

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  Reply # 691553 26-Sep-2012 09:58 Send private message

I'm on the ground floor of an old multi-story building. There's about 7 layers of solid (heavy) concrete over my head. When a quake comes, my plan is to follow my chair out through the window and get clear.
So, no, I didn't participate in the earthquake drill...
On the bright side, I've seen the engineers report on my building that they got done after the chch shakes. It was government built and deliberately over-engineered as it was originally intended as a phone exchange. Won't stop me abandoning ship when it starts wobbling though!

Voice Engineer @ Orcon
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  Reply # 691555 26-Sep-2012 10:01 Send private message

BlueShift: was originally intended as a phone exchange


In that case, you really are better off staying put.  Phone exchanges are hard core.

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  Reply # 691560 26-Sep-2012 10:12 Send private message

I don't subscribe to the "drop, cover, hold" theory, it's very controversial advice world wide.

I am more a "triangle of life " kinda guy, although I like the chair out the window-run for your life system as well.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_of_Life




Artificial intelligence is no match, for natural stupidity



Baby Get Shaky!
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  Reply # 691607 26-Sep-2012 11:41 Send private message

scuwp: I don't subscribe to the "drop, cover, hold" theory, it's very controversial advice world wide.

I am more a "triangle of life " kinda guy, although I like the chair out the window-run for your life system as well.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_of_Life


From experience I don't subscribe to any system, more the "sit there looking stunned, yell at everyone to move under their desks but don't do so yourself, than grab the TV before it falls over". Its worked for me several times Undecided

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  Reply # 691659 26-Sep-2012 13:14 Send private message

scuwp: I don't subscribe to the "drop, cover, hold" theory, it's very controversial advice world wide.

I am more a "triangle of life " kinda guy, although I like the chair out the window-run for your life system as well.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_of_Life


What about collapsing Facades?
Damaged or collapsing stair wells?
How do you know the floor under the carpet is secure?
Broken electrical cabling?

The Drop, Cover, Hold method has been shown to be very affective.




Mike

 Interesting. You're afraid of insects and women. Ladybugs must render you catatonic.

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  Reply # 691676 26-Sep-2012 13:46 Send private message

KiwiNZ: The Drop, Cover, Hold method has been shown to be very affective.



Chch experience has shown...

You wont need to drop - you will be thrown to the ground

You wont need to cover - you will be covered with bricks, beams and concrete

You will be holding - holding on to hope that they might get you out

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  Reply # 691723 26-Sep-2012 14:42 Send private message

jim.cox:
Chch experience has shown...

You wont need to drop - you will be thrown to the ground

You wont need to cover - you will be covered with bricks, beams and concrete

You will be holding - holding on to hope that they might get you out


Yes, I've been told they definition of 'safe sex' in Chch is doing it in a doorway.

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  Reply # 691727 26-Sep-2012 14:48 Send private message

BlueShift:

Yes, I've been told they definition of 'safe sex' in Chch is doing it in a doorway.


So long as the portal is not brick :)

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Emergenecy Management

  Reply # 691748 26-Sep-2012 15:34 Send private message

scuwp: I don't subscribe to the "drop, cover, hold" theory, it's very controversial advice world wide.

I am more a "triangle of life " kinda guy, although I like the chair out the window-run for your life system as well.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_of_Life




Originally generated by self-professed emergency expert, Doug Copp. This advice has been widely discredited by leading emergency management agencies throughout the developed world including New Zealand. However, despite efforts to correct misinformation contained within the email, members of the public still contact civil defence agencies either questioning the triangle of life idea, or more commonly criticising the CDEM sector for advocating ‘drop, cover, and hold’. It is unfortunate that people are so quick to doubt well-developed and researched official advice on the basis of unsolicited information from a self-professed expert.

For your information, our reply to public enquires about this misinformation usually includes the following points:
  • ‘Drop, cover and hold’ is the official advice of the New Zealand Government developed collaboratively with expert agencies such as GNS Science, EQC and the Society of Earthquake Engineers
  • Earthquakes don’t tend to kill people; people die from being struck by falling objects or catastrophic building failure
  • New Zealand’s excellent building code means it is unlikely a building will suffer catastrophic failure
  • Most people greatly underestimate the violent shaking of a strong earthquake and how much of a threat exists from unsecured objects being thrown around a room


Official MCDEM response to the triangle of life advice (PDF)
Academic analysis of the triangle of life advice (PDF) by Dr Marla Petal who has researched the 1999 Izmit, Turkey earthquake

Also being in the Emergency Management sector and being part of the response to the Canterbury Quakes the duck cover and hold saved lives in buildings that had partital collapses.

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  Reply # 691750 26-Sep-2012 15:43 Send private message

underwatervrg:
scuwp: I don't subscribe to the "drop, cover, hold" theory, it's very controversial advice world wide.

I am more a "triangle of life " kinda guy, although I like the chair out the window-run for your life system as well.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_of_Life




Originally generated by self-professed emergency expert, Doug Copp. This advice has been widely discredited by leading emergency management agencies throughout the developed world including New Zealand. However, despite efforts to correct misinformation contained within the email, members of the public still contact civil defence agencies either questioning the triangle of life idea, or more commonly criticising the CDEM sector for advocating ‘drop, cover, and hold’. It is unfortunate that people are so quick to doubt well-developed and researched official advice on the basis of unsolicited information from a self-professed expert.

For your information, our reply to public enquires about this misinformation usually includes the following points:
  • ‘Drop, cover and hold’ is the official advice of the New Zealand Government developed collaboratively with expert agencies such as GNS Science, EQC and the Society of Earthquake Engineers
  • Earthquakes don’t tend to kill people; people die from being struck by falling objects or catastrophic building failure
  • New Zealand’s excellent building code means it is unlikely a building will suffer catastrophic failure
  • Most people greatly underestimate the violent shaking of a strong earthquake and how much of a threat exists from unsecured objects being thrown around a room


Official MCDEM response to the triangle of life advice (PDF)
Academic analysis of the triangle of life advice (PDF) by Dr Marla Petal who has researched the 1999 Izmit, Turkey earthquake


I concur.

While many of us now tend to be a little complacent, being covered is a key to avoid falling objects, and if you can get somewhere safer, do so. Under a sturdy workdesk, next to the legs or particle board sides wil also give you some of the triangle of life, but whereever you are, it will be different. to the guy in the next building or floor.  I also believe in doorways, as I know I am in between studs, and nothing heavy overhead that may fall. I can also move if there is a need.


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  Reply # 691781 26-Sep-2012 16:30 Send private message

I must have missed something. I thought it was 'crouch, touch, pause, engage'?

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  Reply # 691787 26-Sep-2012 16:31 Send private message

Experience from February 22nd - Christchurch:

"Oh crap! That's quite a big one"
"Oh, there's some building dust, maybe I should go under my desk"
*Ceiling tiles fall, monitor from desk attacks me*

Oh, the phone is down, maybe I should go onto the ceiling to check the link is still alright *sees Christchurch city centre, aftershock while I am on the roof of a 2 story building*

Hmm, maybe I should check the datacentre *Big violent aftershock while I am in there, as it turns out server cabinets make good shelter*

From this point:
HOLY CRAP! That was a big one (whilst sitting on the chair in my office on the phone to a customer)

I think I am now a pro, no EQ drill is needed in my case.




Michael Murphy
[Twitter] [Last.fm] [IPv6 Sage]

Everything I say here is my own opinion and not that of my employer.

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  Reply # 691798 26-Sep-2012 16:40 Send private message

michaelmurfy: Experience from February 22nd - Christchurch:

"Oh crap! That's quite a big one"
"Oh, there's some building dust, maybe I should go under my desk"
*Ceiling tiles fall, monitor from desk attacks me*

Oh, the phone is down, maybe I should go onto the ceiling to check the link is still alright *sees Christchurch city centre, aftershock while I am on the roof of a 2 story building*

Hmm, maybe I should check the datacentre *Big violent aftershock while I am in there, as it turns out server cabinets make good shelter*

From this point:
HOLY CRAP! That was a big one (whilst sitting on the chair in my office on the phone to a customer)

I think I am now a pro, no EQ drill is needed in my case.


Well said Micheal. Similar for me in Chch Telecom building in CBD.

I will now update:

Noise, house starts to shake, continue reading Geekzone.
Still going after 5 secods, look up, continue reading Geekzone
Gets no bigger, then stops. Ponder magnitude, distance away, depth
Check that after finished with Geekzone

Bit tongue in cheek I know, but I am sure that we all have acclimatised to all this, been going on for an age and quiet now. BUT, when its big, we all now know what do do.

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  Reply # 691916 26-Sep-2012 21:24 Send private message

I took part along with a few colleagues around me, but frankly I find the idea of needing to practice diving under the desk a bit absurd. What would have been far more constructive would have been some education around what to do in various less-than-ideal scenarios - e.g. out on the street, in a vehicle, or in the supermarket.

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