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90 posts

Master Geek
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Topic # 136303 22-Nov-2013 12:25 Send private message

Hi

I am playing around with ways to send non HD SKY to another TV, and one suggested approach is via the RF Out of the Sky decoder.  By also including the Freeview feed into the Sky decoder, I send it all to the TV via the single aerial Cable.     I understood that the Sky is now non digital, I have auto tuned the analog channels on the TV set and  picked up the sky input.

So.. it all work..  nearly - except that the audio  on the Sky channel not quite right.. and in fact shows up as Mono when I switch to it.    The TV is a Sony Bravia - about 3 yrs old.   Just wondering if this is as expected, or is it related to something to the TV set.  I  don't appear to have any option to to change the sound for Analog  specifically - and its fine when not in Analog mode.    When the sky signal is sent via component, then its all fine.   

Any ideas?  - thanks

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2527 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 317


  Reply # 938960 22-Nov-2013 12:32 Send private message

The RF output is the lowest quality signal possible, and is really just there for backwards compatibility with very old TVs that have no other option - as such, the RF modulator is likely mono audio only.

1613 posts

Uber Geek
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  Reply # 939051 22-Nov-2013 14:35 Send private message

RunningMan:the RF modulator is likely mono audio only.


This, a regular RF modulator is mono only ,

In the "Good Old Days" TVs came in Black and White and had one speaker, then some clever sausage added colour, and for the next 10-20 years the consumer was happy,  If you wanted to watch a big music event or concert, they often "simulcast" the programme on a local FM station so you could get better quality sound.

Later on some dudes at the BBC devised something called NICAM to add stereo sounds( although the Americans and Germans also invented  similar systems.), - 



 

cb1

125 posts

Master Geek


  Reply # 939061 22-Nov-2013 14:53 Send private message

You can take the composite video and left/right audio signals from both Sky and Freeview boxes into the AV inputs on the tv. Will have better picture + stereo sound.

To save having 2 sets of cables or if you don't have enough AV inputs, you can use an AV switch or just swap cables back and forth between the boxes. I've used this method to go ~30m with cables going under the house (poor man's multroom)

Better video still would be using S-video connection, if available



90 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 939168 22-Nov-2013 16:52 Send private message

Thanks for the feedback.

I am setting up another TV set in the house and was looking at ways that I could set the SKY feed to it easily.   Preferably without running cables for component or composite if could do it more easily with a single cable.

Its a run of about 15 metres or so, so I am considering  HDMI output from the HDD recorder ... I think I should be able to split that - although aware that some splitters may not support a run of that distance.

1273 posts

Uber Geek
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  Reply # 939213 22-Nov-2013 18:39 One person supports this post Send private message

pjays: Thanks for the feedback.

I am setting up another TV set in the house and was looking at ways that I could set the SKY feed to it easily.   Preferably without running cables for component or composite if could do it more easily with a single cable.

Its a run of about 15 metres or so, so I am considering  HDMI output from the HDD recorder ... I think I should be able to split that - although aware that some splitters may not support a run of that distance.


Splitting the HDMI is the highest quality single-cable solution by a country mile. RF is the worst. So, unless there is a reason you can't, go with HDMI. It's by far the best option.

A 15m run is pushing it a bit, but isn't ludicrous and should be able to be done. My thoughts:

1.  Use a powered splitter. One of the cheaper pigtail types that just draw off the Decoder's HDMI output likely won't put out as much current (esp as you are splitting the output) and will be a better bet for long runs. From memory the HDMI spec only a source device to provide at least 50mA, which gives 25mA when split, whereas a good powered splitter should put out around 3-500mA on an output.

2.  Normally I advocate cheap HDMI cables. They are digital and either work or not. However, for a longer run you should pay more attention than normal to the quality of the cable. Disregard the make, and DON'T take this as me advocating monster cables or other such overpriced gimmicks. But pay attention to the wire gauge of the cables. Heavier gauge will cost more, but will have a lower voltage drop over a long run. At 15m, its worth paying $10-20 more to get a good heavy gauge.

3.  Consider paying a bit extra for a matrix splitter. All the advantages of a normal splitter, buy let you also connect a blu-ray player, Freeview PVR or or whatever as well, in case you also want to view that on the second TV.

4.  If you can't run HDMI, good component cable will definitely work over those distances. More cables to mess with, but the next highest quality option after HDMI. Vastly better than using RF. If you need HD you can always get something like an HDFury, connect it to the HDMI splitter, and send the HD that way. Contrary to what some claim, you can send HD video over component cables.





90 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 1


  Reply # 939423 23-Nov-2013 10:41 Send private message

Thanks for the detailed response.

What you are suggesting makes sense and I will try and head down that route.

I realised that I would need to get an HDMI powered splitter .... and understand I think what you are saying about getting a matrix type splitter to enable more options in terms of input.   I am also considering a home theatre system (just one of the out of the box ones)  to be linked in with the main TV, and I think some of those setups having something similar to the matrix concept that you have mentioned i.e so that you can  have multiple HDMI inputs that can be toggled.



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