Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.



263 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 7


Topic # 100297 8-Apr-2012 10:24 Send private message

Hi guys just wondering, when do eventually get connected will we have to pay for a Chrous technician to add a new fibre jackpoint to our house, then fork out money for a new Fibre compatible modem, or will we still use the existing Telecom jackpoint we have, which is presently connected to the copper network? I just don't see what's the point of having an exciting fast UFB network, when the wiring to our homes is still the 1970s copper connections?

Will they have to add fibre cabling to our homes, or will we have to do with our copper cabling?

Thanks

View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
37 posts

Geek
+1 received by user: 1

Trusted

  Reply # 606617 8-Apr-2012 10:43 Send private message

Installation of the fibre jackpoint in your home is covered by the standard install fee. At a wholesale level, the install fee charged by the LFC (Chorus, Ultrafast Fibre, Enable, Northpower) to your ISP is $0 for a standard install (within certain distance limits).
It's up to the ISP you choose what they set their install fee to you to be. Remember, the ISP install fee has to cover such things as extra equipment they might supply to you. So it won't necessarily be free.

The LFC won't be using the old phone cabling in your home (or to your home from the street) to bring the fibre service to you. You might use your old phone cabling inside your home to distribute a phone service you buy from your fibre provider, but that's your choice.

The standard installation from any of the LFCs includes an ONT. You could look at this as a converter between fibre optic cable and copper cable.  So there is no requirement for you to run fibre optic cable through your home to make use of the new fibre service.

Your old ADSL router is unlikely to be able to be used on the fibre service.
Depending upon your chosen ISP, the ISP might ship a new model to you or you could buy one.
A basic router compatible with the fibre service can be picked up from main street computer retailers for around $40. 




My opinions (TWEIE) are mine, not my employers. Any statements of fact are drawn from public sources.

2187 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 175

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 606642 8-Apr-2012 12:31 Send private message

To explain a little further on the internal wiring issue

Your 1970's internal wiring is still perfectly good for telephone. The ONT will convert the fibreoptic telephone line to copper so you can still use your standard telephones and the jackpoints in your house.

However with the broadband, you have heaps of options

1) Run Cat5 or Cat6 cables around your house.
2) The router you buy or your isp supplies (Starting at $40) may have a wireless transmitter built in which will talk to any laptop or desktop. Older laptops will require a wireless reciever or "dongle". Desktops more than 12 months will probably also need a dongle. The wireless technology is called wifi and normally goes about half the range of a cordless phone. Remember the ONT or router will probably be on the wall of your house closest to the street and this could be in your garage if attached.
To take advantage of the faster speeds, your wireless router and recievers need to be N type compatible. The old B or G 54mbit will not be any faster than ADSL2+ copper unless you were more than 3km from the exchange. N wifi will make a big difference than G or B.

3) HomePNA technology, commonly called HomePlug allows you to use your internal power cabling to run a network. They have specifically designed the newer models of homeplug adapters to allow you to run high definition video over them at short distances through a medium sized house. This is an easy way to get the signal from the ONT and router to the decoder box behind your TV (without needing to run cat5 cabling) if a cable tv service was launched using the new UFB fibre.

4) HomePNA over telephone copper.
Again using low quality copper, you can actually get some really good speeds, but only over a short distance. 100m. And because your internal telephone wiring will be disconnected from the PSTN network running out in the street and no ADSL will be running on it, you can run what you like over it is the theory behind this. However most people have more power wall outlets than telephone outlets in their homes so the HomePNA over powerline will probably be much more common. 

5) A mix of Cat5 and Wireless, or HomePNA and wireless. 
You can use a cabled solution such as cat5 or HomePNA to get the signal from your router to the far end of your house, where you use secondary router or Access Point base station to extend your wireless coverage throughout your home. Using a wireless repeater will cause a big speed reduction, so you need to cable it as far as you can rather than repeat an existing wireless signal.




Ray Taylor
Taylor Broadband (rural hawkes bay)
www.ruralkiwi.com

There is no place like localhost
For my general guide to extending your wireless network Click Here




679 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 82


  Reply # 608633 13-Apr-2012 09:41 Send private message

Thanks, Shane and Ray, for taking the time to spell things out. Very informative.

19417 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1259

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Subscriber

  Reply # 608669 13-Apr-2012 10:52 Send private message

PaulZA: Hi guys just wondering, when do eventually get connected will we have to pay for a Chrous technician to add a new fibre jackpoint to our house, then fork out money for a new Fibre compatible modem, or will we still use the existing Telecom jackpoint we have, which is presently connected to the copper network? I just don't see what's the point of having an exciting fast UFB network, when the wiring to our homes is still the 1970s copper connections?

Will they have to add fibre cabling to our homes, or will we have to do with our copper cabling?

Thanks



The last few threads in this forum will answer all of your questions.

  

939 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 86


  Reply # 608765 13-Apr-2012 13:57 Send private message

Perhaps this could be locked and stickied? 

679 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 82


  Reply # 609232 14-Apr-2012 11:51 Send private message

I am curious about the router required. Where is the $40 one available from?

Also, if the ONT serves an ethernet port, why is a 'special' router required? How does this differ from any other ethernet port/protocol??

2977 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 174

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 609234 14-Apr-2012 11:56 Send private message

Just a note, wireless N and home plug will NOT be fast enough to take full advantage of the faster UFB 100/50mbps plans. You really need wired cat5e and cat6 - at least to some of your devices.





19417 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1259

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Subscriber

  Reply # 609249 14-Apr-2012 13:09 Send private message

Zeon: Just a note, wireless N and home plug will NOT be fast enough to take full advantage of the faster UFB 100/50mbps plans. You really need wired cat5e and cat6 - at least to some of your devices.


Or use coax and HCNA if you have existing infrastructure. You can get 100Mbps for cheap as chips pricing for up to 63 devices in your home.


19417 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1259

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Subscriber

  Reply # 609250 14-Apr-2012 13:15 Send private message

linw: I am curious about the router required. Where is the $40 one available from?

Also, if the ONT serves an ethernet port, why is a 'special' router required? How does this differ from any other ethernet port/protocol??


The ONT has 4 ethernet ports that affer the ability to deliver 4 different ethernet based products (from the same or different RSP's) to your premises.

It's best to think of these solely as a connection point, much like an existing phone jack for xDSL based services. While many ONT's support the ability to perform NAT and act as a router you will have no control over the ONT, so the installation of a ethernet router is the most logical option. If you only have a single PC and are happy configuring this for PPPoE then your RSP may allow connecting this directly to the ONT without the requirement for a router.

As for $40 routers there are perfectly good TP-Link models for this price and their cheapest wireless models are only a few $ more.


2187 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 175

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 609413 14-Apr-2012 20:28 Send private message

linw: I am curious about the router required. Where is the $40 one available from?

Also, if the ONT serves an ethernet port, why is a 'special' router required? How does this differ from any other ethernet port/protocol??


The special router is special because most routers in NZ are actually all-in-one ADSL modems and routers. You specifically need an ethernet router without the ADSL part, which also makes them cheaper. 

Here is where you can buy them from new 

The ONT ports are for different ISP's or services. It wont work like a network switch - your ISP will be assigned a port on your ONT box. You can sometimes plug a computer directly into it and manually set up your network connection but this is more difficult for most users and your ISP wont know what you are talking about when you call and ask for help. (The word PPPoE wont be in most of their CSR's scripts and will be too much for most of the CSR's to comprehend)






Ray Taylor
Taylor Broadband (rural hawkes bay)
www.ruralkiwi.com

There is no place like localhost
For my general guide to extending your wireless network Click Here




2329 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 78


  Reply # 609444 14-Apr-2012 22:55 Send private message

So, nothing stopping you from plugging a linux box with dual NICs into the ONT, then?

170 posts

Master Geek


  Reply # 609460 15-Apr-2012 00:12 Send private message

raytaylor 
The ONT ports are for different ISP's or services. It wont work like a network switch - your ISP will be assigned a port on your ONT box. You can sometimes plug a computer directly into it and manually set up your network connection but this is more difficult for most users and your ISP wont know what you are talking about when you call and ask for help. (The word PPPoE wont be in most of their CSR's scripts and will be too much for most of the CSR's to comprehend.)


PPPoE connections are very easy to create on Windows based computers. Rather sadly you would probably be very surprised at the number of computers that already have a dialup connection called "Broadband" set up on them.

The Windows connection wizard has the PPPoE dialer as the first option.

How do you connect to the Internet?
Option 1 Broadband

Couldn't really be much simpler than that. Wink 

2187 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 175

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 609474 15-Apr-2012 04:44 Send private message

Oldhat:

PPPoE connections are very easy to create on Windows based computers. Rather sadly you would probably be very surprised at the number of computers that already have a dialup connection called "Broadband" set up on them.

The Windows connection wizard has the PPPoE dialer as the first option.

How do you connect to the Internet?
Option 1 Broadband

Couldn't really be much simpler than that. Wink 


That is true - and i am constantly deleting the default 'broadband' connection. I just dont see it as being important enough to be included in the support scripts for the CSR's at a typical ISP.

It will be less common than those that still use PCI DSL modems - which work almost exactly the same way. Once upon a time they were very popular - now there are no isp's that support them.




Ray Taylor
Taylor Broadband (rural hawkes bay)
www.ruralkiwi.com

There is no place like localhost
For my general guide to extending your wireless network Click Here




19417 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1259

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Subscriber

  Reply # 609477 15-Apr-2012 07:44 Send private message

Oldhat:
raytaylor 
The ONT ports are for different ISP's or services. It wont work like a network switch - your ISP will be assigned a port on your ONT box. You can sometimes plug a computer directly into it and manually set up your network connection but this is more difficult for most users and your ISP wont know what you are talking about when you call and ask for help. (The word PPPoE wont be in most of their CSR's scripts and will be too much for most of the CSR's to comprehend.)


PPPoE connections are very easy to create on Windows based computers. Rather sadly you would probably be very surprised at the number of computers that already have a dialup connection called "Broadband" set up on them.

The Windows connection wizard has the PPPoE dialer as the first option.

How do you connect to the Internet?
Option 1 Broadband

Couldn't really be much simpler than that. Wink 


Can't be much simpler than that - but then you're left dealing with people running XT with a fixed PPPoE MTU suffering from poor performance because the ISP uses a MTU of 1492.

One of the biggest costs to an ISP is support. You simplify this by providing specific hardware that you can easily diagnose and support, and not supporting 3rd party configurations.




263 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 7


  Reply # 610130 16-Apr-2012 17:36 Send private message

thanks guys, it seems clearer now. Just how much are the "Standard install fees" I was reading on a post, that they basically have to dig your whole property up to lay the fibre optic cabling for your house. Is that subsidized or funded or anyway? Because the contractors fees could easily be over $5k alone. Not many people, except the extremely wealthy people could afford that. Not many people will take up UFB if the install fee is through the roof!

 1 | 2
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic




Twitter »
Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:




News »

Trending now »
Hot discussions in our forums right now:

Warning: Rage Ahead - Campbell Live and childhood poverty
Created by kawaii, last reply by KiwiNZ on 3-Sep-2014 06:33 (132 replies)
Pages... 7 8 9


Does NZ need better gun laws?
Created by mattwnz, last reply by kawaii on 3-Sep-2014 05:40 (105 replies)
Pages... 5 6 7


What tyre brand/model to look at ?
Created by Mark, last reply by Oblivian on 2-Sep-2014 21:36 (35 replies)
Pages... 2 3


VideoEZY OnDemand
Created by Andib, last reply by davidcole on 2-Sep-2014 20:10 (63 replies)
Pages... 3 4 5


Judith Collins: I am resigning
Created by Presso, last reply by gzt on 2-Sep-2014 11:42 (109 replies)
Pages... 6 7 8


Cirque du Soleil Cellphone Hijack
Created by myopinion, last reply by PhantomNVD on 1-Sep-2014 18:01 (21 replies)
Pages... 2


Orcon Global Mode launched
Created by freitasm, last reply by shk292 on 1-Sep-2014 11:32 (132 replies)
Pages... 7 8 9


Lightbox press event release
Created by freitasm, last reply by IcI on 30-Aug-2014 17:54 (562 replies)
Pages... 36 37 38



Geekzone Live »
Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.

Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.