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Displaced Viking
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Topic # 175457 30-Jun-2015 15:38 Send private message

An odd question for a Tech site I know but this place is a treasure house of information.

I have to get a Wheelchair ramp installed at the rear of my home, this is an area that during the winter does not get much sun and I have been advised that for safety reason
I should not get a wooden or concrete  construction.

Has anyone had experience with Aluminium ramps?

There is a company Able Axcess Ltd that makes aluminium ramps has anyone had any experience with these guys? (see link below)

Any advice would be gratefully accepted. 

http://www.ableaxcess.co.nz/able%20axcess%20website_007.htm

The ramp would look similar to this





Mike
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The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 

 

Don't use that mobility toilet if you can use a tree, don't use that mobility park if you can walk from down the road, don't mock that disability be it visible or not and remember it can take but a minute to join us.

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1334248 30-Jun-2015 15:56 Send private message

My mate had one at his old place for his wheelchair bound daughter, I can ask him if you don't get any more direct responses.




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Displaced Viking
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  Reply # 1334253 30-Jun-2015 15:58 Send private message

Thank you muchly that would be very appreciated




Mike
Retired IT Manager, Freelance money spender
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 

 

Don't use that mobility toilet if you can use a tree, don't use that mobility park if you can walk from down the road, don't mock that disability be it visible or not and remember it can take but a minute to join us.

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1334337 30-Jun-2015 17:16 One person supports this post Send private message

I've had some experience building wheelchair ramps. Though no aluminium ones.

Almost any finish will get slippery on the shaded side of a building, resistance to initial slime & mould growth, ease of cleaning are key. We've also had to modify some existing ones.

One particularly slippery cedar surfaced ramp we stapled galv chicken mesh over to give a usable surface.
Another, a steel chequer plate death trap we blasted & painted with marine non slip anti fungal paint.
Nailed & glued artificial turf to a concrete one for a hideous yet slip resistant result.

Must say I like the aesthetic of the ones you've linked. Don't know how stable they'd feel without foundations. But a test roll on an installed one will tell you how it feels.

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  Reply # 1334342 30-Jun-2015 17:31 One person supports this post Send private message

The NZ building code has rules regarding what materials have adequate slip resistance for access routes.  For a private house these rules apply only to the main entrance way.  Since private houses are not required to provide "accessible" routes (that is with facilities for use by people with disabilities) the rule for slip resistance will not apply to your ramp.  However you can still use the code as a guide to what is suitable.

For a complying ramp in a wet situation you would NOT be allowed to use profiled aluminium, unless the supplier has the slip resistance specifically tested to NZS 3661.1, and I doubt that it would comply if it was tested.

The relevant section of the building code is here:

http://www.building.govt.nz/UserFiles/File/Publications/Building/Compliance-documents/D1-access-routes-2nd-edition-amendment-5.pdf

See Table 2 on p22 of the Acceptable Solution.  But as I said above, you are not bound by this for an accessible ramp in a private house.




McLean



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  Reply # 1334357 30-Jun-2015 18:12 Send private message

mclean: The NZ building code has rules regarding what materials have adequate slip resistance for access routes.  For a private house these rules apply only to the main entrance way.  Since private houses are not required to provide "accessible" routes (that is with facilities for use by people with disabilities) the rule for slip resistance will not apply to your ramp.  However you can still use the code as a guide to what is suitable.

For a complying ramp in a wet situation you would NOT be allowed to use profiled aluminium, unless the supplier has the slip resistance specifically tested to NZS 3661.1, and I doubt that it would comply if it was tested.

The relevant section of the building code is here:

http://www.building.govt.nz/UserFiles/File/Publications/Building/Compliance-documents/D1-access-routes-2nd-edition-amendment-5.pdf

See Table 2 on p22 of the Acceptable Solution.  But as I said above, you are not bound by this for an accessible ramp in a private house.


I will ring them to see what the slip resistance is like, the pattern on the rpm looks similar to what I have seen on boats and marina's. The ramp is going to have a 1 in 15 gradient so not very steep, the Occupational Therapist has specified a shallower
gradient to normal as I have problems propelling my wheelchair on steeper gradients.




Mike
Retired IT Manager, Freelance money spender
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 

 

Don't use that mobility toilet if you can use a tree, don't use that mobility park if you can walk from down the road, don't mock that disability be it visible or not and remember it can take but a minute to join us.

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1334453 30-Jun-2015 20:52 One person supports this post Send private message

My daughter has had one of those ramps for her chair at the previous address for 3 years. Same company etc. Health board supplied once application was approved for semi permanent ramp access.

Never ever had any issues with slip. They have a combination of standard aluminium grip tread and near the door they have like a thick punched mesh aluminium panel. Fully adjugable and modular. Can't recommend them enough

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  Reply # 1334532 1-Jul-2015 00:00 One person supports this post Send private message

Only issue we had was it heating up in summer a bit. Other than thay was sweet

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  Reply # 1335455 1-Jul-2015 22:49 Send private message

I must say that looks very ugly in that picture.
I think a wooden decking ramp would look much nicer.

Alot of primary schools have wooden sheltered decking outside the classrooms with PVC Coil Carpet glued and stapled down as an anti slip surface on the decking ramps. It looks quite nice if you get a blue-grey or green-grey color.

https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=plastic+carpet+outdoor&client=firefox-a&hs=fpw&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&channel=sb&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=-sOTVf_QEoTnoATnkrfgAg&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1280&bih=547#channel=sb&tbm=isch&q=coil+mat+carpet&imgrc=CX4vnGybZ18sJM%3A 



The best part is its very nice to walk on.




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  Reply # 1335482 2-Jul-2015 06:05 Send private message

personally i would go wood or concrete, and use a grip tread type product, i find the aluminum looks cheap and temporary. But its not my decision.

http://www.rampworx.co.nz/home-solutions/
there are a couple for wooden ramps near the bottom

concrete you can paint with non slip paint or when its laid brush it with a broom to give some rough contours to the top to provide grip

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  Reply # 1335483 2-Jul-2015 06:06 Send private message

I reckon tha aluminium one looks fine and makes a lot more sense from a maintenance point of view. Walking people can take the stairs if they want.



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  Reply # 1335485 2-Jul-2015 07:04 Send private message

Its going at the back of our home, visitors wouldn't even know its there. With these looks are the least important, functionality, longevity and safety are the prime factors.
I was concerned about the slip resistance and I am waiting to hear back from an email I sent to the manufacturer. 




Mike
Retired IT Manager, Freelance money spender
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 

 

Don't use that mobility toilet if you can use a tree, don't use that mobility park if you can walk from down the road, don't mock that disability be it visible or not and remember it can take but a minute to join us.

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1335544 2-Jul-2015 09:59 Send private message

MikeB4: Its going at the back of our home, visitors wouldn't even know its there. With these looks are the least important, functionality, longevity and safety are the prime factors.
I was concerned about the slip resistance and I am waiting to hear back from an email I sent to the manufacturer. 

With a 1:15 slope I can't imagine you getting into an uncontrollable 4 wheel slide even with ice all over it. (you don't strike me as the boy racer type Mike) Although I can imagine someone walking on it slipping. I would say cold hands on the aluminum rail would be more likely.

As for icy metal walkways, the ones I have used have been the ones you can see through (like the fire escape type ones) you don't slip at all on those. Cant wear high heels either but I've never had the inclination.




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  Reply # 1335858 2-Jul-2015 15:47 Send private message

That ramp looks like very light gauge plate and bar to me.

Alloy tread plate holds an amount of moisture amongst the grip pattern - enough to get slimy in a shaded location.  Alloy doesn't like the  bleach based products used to remove slime, which tend to blacken alloy. 

When its new it glares, when it's old it gets hot on a sunny day.




Mike



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  Reply # 1335862 2-Jul-2015 15:51 Send private message

mdooher:
MikeB4: Its going at the back of our home, visitors wouldn't even know its there. With these looks are the least important, functionality, longevity and safety are the prime factors.
I was concerned about the slip resistance and I am waiting to hear back from an email I sent to the manufacturer. 

With a 1:15 slope I can't imagine you getting into an uncontrollable 4 wheel slide even with ice all over it. (you don't strike me as the boy racer type Mike) Although I can imagine someone walking on it slipping. I would say cold hands on the aluminum rail would be more likely.

As for icy metal walkways, the ones I have used have been the ones you can see through (like the fire escape type ones) you don't slip at all on those. Cant wear high heels either but I've never had the inclination.


You would be surprised I can get the chair up to some crazy speeds tongue-out

I wish I had pics of it when the guys at work took it away a pimped it.




Mike
Retired IT Manager, Freelance money spender
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 

 

Don't use that mobility toilet if you can use a tree, don't use that mobility park if you can walk from down the road, don't mock that disability be it visible or not and remember it can take but a minute to join us.

 

 

 

 




Displaced Viking
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  Reply # 1335865 2-Jul-2015 15:55 Send private message

MikeAqua: That ramp looks like very light gauge plate and bar to me.

Alloy tread plate holds an amount of moisture amongst the grip pattern - enough to get slimy in a shaded location.  Alloy doesn't like the  bleach based products used to remove slime, which tend to blacken alloy. 

When its new it glares, when it's old it gets hot on a sunny day.


I have some cleaner we used on the boat ( Stabicraft) it should work for cleaning, it never dulled or discoloured the bare alloy showing although most of it was painted except below the water line.
I did think about heat as parts of the boat would get very hot




Mike
Retired IT Manager, Freelance money spender
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 

 

Don't use that mobility toilet if you can use a tree, don't use that mobility park if you can walk from down the road, don't mock that disability be it visible or not and remember it can take but a minute to join us.

 

 

 

 


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