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Topic # 110832 17-Oct-2012 11:45 Send private message

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Consumers can enjoy all the benefits of flat screen television technology with minimal electricity use, with all makes and models now required to perform to minimum standards of energy efficiency.

The Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority has introduced a minimum energy performance standard for televisions from 1 October, which means that all new TVs in New Zealand are efficient users of energy, including when in standby.

Complementing the standard is a star rating label, like that already seen on whiteware, which indicates levels of energy efficiency: more stars mean greater energy efficiency.  Some televisions sold in New Zealand already display the star ratings but they will now be required on all televisions.  Choosing a model with a high star rating means consumers save money on the television’s ongoing running costs.

Products manager Terry Collins says many people don’t realise how much energy modern televisions can use, with TVs now the fourth biggest energy consuming appliance in the average household.

“It used to be that you could find modern televisions that drew more power than the household fridge,” says Mr Collins.

“Coupled with the increasing use of large screen TVs with video game consoles, digital video recorders, and streaming/on-demand video devices, this recent explosion in television technology has meant the amount of electricity potentially consumed by gone up and up.”

EECA worked with the Australian Government in a joint programme looking into performance standards around television energy efficiency as part of its Trans Tasman Equipment Energy Efficiency programme.

“After consultation with industry and other stakeholders, we found introducing a minimum energy performance standard and labelling the best measures to take.  The standard prevents the worst performers from entering the market, and labelling helps consumers identify how much electricity a TV uses and compare the energy efficiency of similar models.  The introduction of these will have little impact on the range of models or sizes available; rather, it will just ensure that those available will be designed to use less energy.”

It is forecast that over $900 million of electricity will be saved over the next ten years* as a result of introducing and upgrading MEPS and labelling for TV.

* Assuming 10 hours of use a day, at the rate of 20.4c/kWh
 




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  Reply # 702443 17-Oct-2012 12:14 Send private message

I guess this will see some of the discount retailers forced to give up selling exotic branded TV sets.

I note their release doesn't mention what the cost or timeframe of obtaining compliance is....

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  Reply # 702446 17-Oct-2012 12:26 Send private message

10 hours a day watching TV? The power usage should be the last thing you should be thinking about if your watching that amount of TV.




                                           

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  Reply # 702454 17-Oct-2012 12:51 Send private message

There is a statistics NZ survey from 1998 that gives an average of two hours viewing time per person. The 'simultaneous' marker indicates engaging in other activities at the same time:



I can understand some households would run a television almost all day increasing the average but how many really. On the other hand - with the strong dollar, lower prices, and convenient form factors there is every chance households have added more TV's per household.




Energy saving and monitoring devices available in NZ: www.energymonitor.org.nz

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  Reply # 702504 17-Oct-2012 13:32 Send private message

Wonder if it will mean the end to plasmas which tend to use more power than LED's. I would have thought that tv power usage standard was pretty low priority.

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  Reply # 702553 17-Oct-2012 15:27 Send private message

This is just Energy Smart with a different name and more specific product. Seems like a waste of time tbh.

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  Reply # 702561 17-Oct-2012 15:32 Send private message

I would prefer they spent their time doing something about lighting, which uses far more power than tvs. Perhaps more affordable LEDS and ban standard incandescent bulbs.

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  Reply # 702582 17-Oct-2012 16:03 Send private message

mattwnz: Wonder if it will mean the end to plasmas which tend to use more power than LED's. I would have thought that tv power usage standard was pretty low priority.


It hasn't meant the end overseas, just a degradation of panel brightness and black levels which are both electrically intensive.

http://www.energywise.govt.nz/products/listing/93/television
There is a link to the specification at the bottom of the page.

mattwnz: I would prefer they spent their time doing something about lighting, which uses far more power than tvs. Perhaps more affordable LEDS and ban standard incandescent bulbs.

I don't think standard incandescents should be banned but some kind of penalty would be needed to move people on to substitute them with something more sensible like halogens as half the public look no further than up front costs. How can they call a 500h 100watt light bulb a "budget" bulb?

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  Reply # 702610 17-Oct-2012 17:05 Send private message

mattwnz: I would prefer they spent their time doing something about lighting, which uses far more power than tvs. Perhaps more affordable LEDS and ban standard incandescent bulbs.

I don't think the EECA can do anything to make LED's cheaper - unless you want absolutely awful LED's mandated.

LED adoption will just have to wait for the manufacturing price to drop with increase in demand and associated improvements to the manufacturing process.

In 2008 a time frame was proposed to phase out incandescents. From memory of what I read at the time the proposal specified as a goal an elimination of incandescent technology - instead of an efficiency goal. Hmm. In any case this phase out plan was cancelled by the next government.

bfginger: I don't think standard incandescents should be banned but some kind of penalty would be needed to move people on to substitute them with something more sensible like halogens as half the public look no further than up front costs. How can they call a 500h 100watt light bulb a "budget" bulb?

I'm sure you know this - but halogen is an incandescent technology, and some types of halogen are more efficient than others. Consumer, Countdown,EECA

Good question about how people make these decisions. My guess is adoption will be higher among home owners and long term renters with adoption lower in other segments. But who knows? research can sometimes provide surprising results.




Energy saving and monitoring devices available in NZ: www.energymonitor.org.nz

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  Reply # 702612 17-Oct-2012 18:37 Send private message

gzt: Consumer, Countdown,EECA

Good question about how people make these decisions. My guess is adoption will be higher among home owners and long term renters with adoption lower in other segments. But who knows? research can sometimes provide surprising results.


Maybe we could work out a way to manufacturer high quality LEDs in NZ or at least design them here, and export them. Could be a growth business, as they are quite high margin things.

The thing is that incandescents were in the process of being phased out before national came into power, but I recall that policy was reversed. I think one reason it was reversed because there aren't really alternatives that are as good yet, at an affordable price. Energysavers/flouros simply aren't up to the job in terms of light quality and startup time. LEDs are, but they are too expensive, at least the decent ones are. Even the poor quality ones being sold in retailers are very expensive, and there must be companies in NZ making a lot from selling LEDs.

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  Reply # 702619 17-Oct-2012 18:50 Send private message

* Assuming 10 hours of use a day, at the rate of 20.4 c/kWh

I do wish these Govt. agencies would do their research before coming out with figures based on outdated information.  Power costs since August have risen to 30+ c/kWh which is a huge increase on 20.





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  Reply # 702649 17-Oct-2012 19:37 Send private message

Sigh.... more petty bureaucrats micro-managing our lives for us.

I don't have a problem with labeling the devices to indicate how they stack up energy-consumption wise. That's useful information that can help us make us make better decisions.

I do have an issue when they start highhandedly mandating and banning this way. If they want to cut power use then put a tax on electricity, and let us decide how much we value an particular activity or appliance. Trundling out the "but, but, but......... we're saving you money" justification is trite. If I'm a movie buff I might regard the extra 5-10c power that the screen of my choice uses to screen the picture as well worth it.

Same with lightbulbs. I have efficient bulbs in most of my fittings. I prefer 60W incandescents in reading lamps because I find they give me less eye-strain for the half hour or son bed each night. I know how much the (trivial) extra energy cost is, and have made an informed decision. I don't need some pettifogging bureaucrat to decide that I *ought* to choose differently and, in my own interest, they will compel me to do so. It's also why, after the last attempt at banning them, I now have a very, very large stockpile of incandescent bulbs.

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  Reply # 702660 17-Oct-2012 20:00 Send private message

clevedon: 10 hours a day watching TV? The power usage should be the last thing you should be thinking about if your watching that amount of TV.


ive got 2 tv's that are on 16 hours a day each, one is on because i like it on when im using the computer,the other one because my wife is sick and struggles to get out of bed, must turn 1 off  and see how much i save.Smile

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  Reply # 702680 17-Oct-2012 21:06 Send private message

JimmyH: Sigh.... more petty bureaucrats micro-managing our lives for us.

I don't need some pettifogging bureaucrat to decide that I *ought* to choose differently and, in my own interest, they will compel me to do so. It's also why, after the last attempt at banning them, I now have a very, very large stockpile of incandescent bulbs.


That's one reason labour got voted out last time, and why the ban on incandescents was removed by National. Just hope they don't get back in soon, as I think that could be the least of our worries, especially if they start printing money.I think phasing out anything when the alternatives aren't as good is bad.

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  Reply # 702699 17-Oct-2012 21:37 Send private message

I'm glad minimum energy efficiency standards have come in for TVs. Too many people are ignorant, lazy or cheap to import/sell or buy energy efficient appliances.
The new requirement isn't even that stringent, it just prevents really crap TVs being sold here.
The 10 star rating seems a bit silly, but I guess it provide for future TVs like LED or whatever will replace LCD and plasma.
It's annoying the test standards are not available for free though.

As an example, my in-laws used to live in Tasmania, and complained about how expensive power was there campared to in NZ. I asked to see their power bills, and discovered that their power was cheaper than here (Meridian/Christchurch) but they used heaps of it. Now they've moved back to Paraparaumu, they have installed several 'eco' wall panel heaters. I despair.

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  Reply # 702708 17-Oct-2012 22:54 Send private message

I suspect almost all current TVs at retail, including Plasmas, will fall within the new standards. Manufacturers are normally fairly well ahead of mandated limits, if experience overseas applies here.

What I've noticed is that TVs now come fairly well optimized for power efficiency out of the box, whereas, five or so years ago you could dramatically change a TVs power consumption by adjusting such things as back light and mode setting.

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