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4 posts

Wannabe Geek


Topic # 113010 2-Jan-2013 09:01 Send private message

Hi there
I am currently wiring our new house and I am
Trying to future proof as much as possible. I've done quite a bit of reading on the Internet but am still not entirely sure if I am doing it right.... I am trying to achieve a cable free tv -so sky/Internet/media etc is hidden. I also wanted to do feeds into the master bedroom and other rooms so that media can be viewed anywhere.
I have made a main board under the stairs. From this I have sent 3 coax cables from the sky dish. I have wired from here 7.1 surround sound into the lounge using speaker cable. I have also run 3xcat6 to the lounge and 1x cat6 to each room. I've read some stuff on the Internet that suggests I need to run 2x cat 6 to each room? Does that mean I also need another 3 cat6 to the lounge?
Any help is much appreciated!
Thanks

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  Reply # 739305 2-Jan-2013 09:11 Send private message

The extra runs of cable are about future proofing - you may not need them now, but in 18 months, you may change your mind, or buy some new piece of equipment that you hadn't considered.

I'd have at least 2 runs going to each place you have an outlet (so double runs to bedrooms, or 2 x double runs if they are a big bedroom), and add one more to your lounge area near the TV. Perhaps another outlet at the other end of the room as well? If for any reason an outlet fails later in service due to a dmaged cable run, you've already got spare in the walls.

Basically, the cable itself is cheap, but the time, labour and effort required to pull through new runs of cable once walls are gibbed is immense, so now is the time to do it, even for areas you don't think you will need outlets.

Also, make sure you run an outlet or two in a place that would be good for a wireless access point, and a couple of runs from your central cupboard back to the point or area that communications will come in from the street (be it copper or UFB).



4 posts

Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 739307 2-Jan-2013 09:16 Send private message

That's really helpful, thankyou! I will work on that today. This may be a silly question but do I need any kind of feed for a universal remote system, or do they just work wirelessly?
Thank you!!!

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  Reply # 739308 2-Jan-2013 09:19 Send private message

They all use different systems. Most would have the ability to use a cat5/6 cable run, some will be radio frequency (wireless). Best bet is to look at a couple, decide what features you need, and see what technology it uses.

I'm sure some people will pop up here with recommendations though.

BTW: Welcome to Geekzone

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  Reply # 739309 2-Jan-2013 09:21 Send private message

You may also want to have runs of RG6 coax, together with one or two cat5/6 from your cupboard to any point in the house that you may want a TV in the future.



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Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 739311 2-Jan-2013 09:27 Send private message

I really appreciate your help! Thank you. I've done a runof coax to the master bedroom and also have done a loop to an exterior wall where we plan to add an extension in a year or so for a second lounge and media room. This will just sit in the wall until we are ready to pull it through. I will do the same with 4x cat6 for this also. As I've chosen monopitch and raked ceilings it will be too difficult in the future to pull these cables through.

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  Reply # 739314 2-Jan-2013 09:35 Send private message

Intraining: As I've chosen monopitch and raked ceilings it will be too difficult in the future to pull these cables through.


That's pretty much the key here. The price of a few hundred metres of cable compared to the build price of a house is trivial in comparison to trying to put it through at a later date.

You could pull through extra runs, and leave them hidden in walls unused if you don't want the expense of terminating them now. Just make sure each is a single point to point run from your data cupboard, to a single outlet - don't daisy chain any from outlet to outlet.

Also, make sure you mark accurately on the wiring house plan exactly where each outlet is, as well as the unused cables - in a couple of years when you go to use one of those cable runs, you'll forget where it was!

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  Reply # 739335 2-Jan-2013 11:33 Send private message

Glad to hear you are wanting to do this properly! Take a look at the following:

http://www.tcf.org.nz/content/f9a076cc-cdcc-4e2b-9c49-77abf23f7736.cmr

What I would also make sure is that you find where on the outside of your house the lead in for your phone will be and make sure you run 2x cat6 to this location from your wiring cupboard. You may also want to install conduit with pulling wire so that in the future, you can get fibre installed directly to your wiring cupboard rather than putting the ONT somewhere away from the rest of your equipment.







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Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 739405 2-Jan-2013 15:40 Send private message

Thank you for helping me. I'm just a little confused. Why would I need the coax cable into the lounge (for the tv) currently I've got 3 coax feeds coming from the fish to the cupboard under the stairs (main board) and have 4 cat6 cables running from the main board to the lounge/tv. I was under the impression that I could have the sky decoder under the stairs using an amplified signal to the sky remote Nd ten send the sky signal through car6 to the tv so that it is just the tv located in the lounge rather than the tv, sky decoder etc etc.
thanks!

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  Reply # 739413 2-Jan-2013 16:26 Send private message

If you don't run coax through to the areas you may want a TV, then you have basically restricted yourself to having a Sky or similar receiver in your cupboard to watch TV.

By running RG6 coax to areas you may want a TV, then later on you (or a subsequent owner) can patch through either a satellite or terrestrial UHF signal to watch TV directly. If you wanted to have a TV without Sky, just picking up Freeview (either terrestrial or Satellite) then you'll need to be able to get this signal to the TV.

Basically, what you want to do is completely possible (run the Sky decoder through HDMI over cat6 from a remote location), but unless you run the coax through to the TV points, you've restricted yourself to this setup only. The idea of a structured cabling system is it future proofs, and can be easily reconfigured if requirements change.

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  Reply # 739428 2-Jan-2013 17:26 Send private message

RunningMan: If you don't run coax through to the areas you may want a TV, then you have basically restricted yourself to having a Sky or similar receiver in your cupboard to watch TV.

By running RG6 coax to areas you may want a TV, then later on you (or a subsequent owner) can patch through either a satellite or terrestrial UHF signal to watch TV directly. If you wanted to have a TV without Sky, just picking up Freeview (either terrestrial or Satellite) then you'll need to be able to get this signal to the TV.

Basically, what you want to do is completely possible (run the Sky decoder through HDMI over cat6 from a remote location), but unless you run the coax through to the TV points, you've restricted yourself to this setup only. The idea of a structured cabling system is it future proofs, and can be easily reconfigured if requirements change.


Yea I feel your sentiment RE no coax and in most cases you won't need it. But it may put off future buyers of the house who do not have Sky.





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  Reply # 739439 2-Jan-2013 17:41 Send private message

Also, to save having to mouse future wire runs, that you didnt think of, either leavce a pull through wire, or to make it really easy, put some conduit through your joists for the wire, that way in future you can just push the wires through to the ceiling.

No mousing required.

-Al

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  Reply # 739477 2-Jan-2013 19:47 Send private message

Relevant to my interest!

We are redzone CHC moving to a new BoF burb further north.

The insurance cover has only blessed us with current value, not like for like replacement with cabling (boooo) so we have agreement to go in afterward and add cabling of our own (since done)

We were allocated _7_ outlets in a 4bdrm 2 living area space. Which was WAY low for todays requirements considering the phone will also be VOIP only. And only 4 coax runs (3 room, 1 back feed)

As it stands, have since added another _11_ runs and could possibly find more just to be proof'd enough!

I have put 1 eth behind each main tv area (2xbdrm, 2x living) and after figuring some people also run media/DVD/PVR units,
a further one at AV position in 1 room and the 2 lounge areas. Worst case they get small switches behind them for more.

Did similar with a few runs of Coax, 1 to the tv, 1 to the AV area as often you want direct freeview to your tv (can include back-fed sky) AND either separate sat dish for other DVB-S, or again, PVR/additional sky box or tuner.

Outlets can be jumpered at the hub point for either phone or data, but not both. So we thought it is relevant have added a second run beside the allocated 'phone' outlet for the likes of laptop to go beside the bed or additional PC near a phone desk

As stated, also added draw wire and pre-laid a run of cables for surround speaker in the main lounge. Even tho they wont be used straight away, it saves adding them later and makes for a re-sale point as having a fully capable AV room.

For tv-Av area, you can run 25-50mm ducting.. where possible, duct duct duct. It makes life so much easier for drawing or adding HDMI or audio cables down the track.

Have as said also added an outlet to the roofspace, near a power outlet to put a media server and or wireless AP in the roof space away from the Hub in the garage.

So yes, best advise. Sit down and think future, what what could be added to your kit, or someone else might have if you sell up and move and want a good sales point.

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