Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.



25 posts

Geek


Topic # 94457 12-Dec-2011 10:59 Send private message

Hello all. Looking for a solution. We have 2 incoming lines which now aren't enough. Rather than install yet another line I'm wondering about a VOIP alternative. I'm reasonably literate but untrained so something that I don't have to get deep in the bowels of would be good. All information/suggestions/recommendations gratefully received.

View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2 | 3
104 posts

Master Geek


  Reply # 556832 12-Dec-2011 11:07 Send private message

Hi Vroom,

Sounds like a VoIP system could be really helpful for you as your business is expanding.  

A system such as "Virtual PBX" could work really well, where don't have a central PABX anymore, but instead have a number of "Smart" VoIP phones, which can do all the functions of a traditional PABX (and some).  It's easily expandable and relatively cost effective.  It also means you can easily have more than 3 concurrent calls for probably less than what you pay at the moment.

There are a number of VoIP providers who provide this service.  We are one of them - others include 2talk and World Exchange.   If you search these forums there's heaps of information about VoIP systems here.

Cheers
Phil 

3015 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 197

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 556839 12-Dec-2011 11:13 Send private message

Your probably best to get a virtual PABX (not sure about the quality of providers out there though) or get a cloud server/VPS and host your own PBX. I recently installed a PBX in a flash system for a small company with 2 offices in Auckland that can handle up to 4 concurrent calls via World Exchange. Costs all up are around $50 a month for the VPS and line rentals and calling charges are much less. This was down from about $180 for 2x Telecom landlines at each site.

The phones we elected to go with are around $150 (Yealink) but there are a million and one options from analogue ATAs to very flash desk phones.

Either way your going to save a lot of money and get a heap more features by shifting to a VOIP system.







25 posts

Geek


  Reply # 556873 12-Dec-2011 12:11 Send private message

Thanks for that. And what's call quality like? I had a VOIP home phone from Scorch a few years back and I thought it was fine. But the boss will slaughter me if it's not 100%!

104 posts

Master Geek


  Reply # 556877 12-Dec-2011 12:23 Send private message

Hi Vroom,

I can't speak for the other providers of course, but you can never guarantee VoIP will be perfect 100% of the time.  The major factor influencing the quality of the service, is the quality and reliability of your internet connection.  

If you have a good and reliable connection then the quality of your VoIP lines will generally be great, and you'll have little issues.  Fibre is by far the best internet connection to run on.  Lots of our customers use ADSL, but it comes with a disclaimer that it's a best effort service.

If you need 100% quality/reliability and don't want to go down the fibre road, you're best to stick with traditional technologies. If you have a good ADSL connection and are willing to cope with occasional down-time, then VoIP could still work for you

Cheers 

3015 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 197

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 556878 12-Dec-2011 12:23 Send private message

VOIP is heaps clearer than analogue PSTn and also better in my experience than ISDN. This is using the older codecs like g711 though. The new high definition codecs like g722 are faaaaar better than any of the aforementioned and it sounds literally like your in the same room as the person. Just make sure you have a good rotuer that support QoS. An old PC with pfsense would do the trick.





5438 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 227

Subscriber

  Reply # 556892 12-Dec-2011 12:42 Send private message

Zeon: VOIP is heaps clearer than analogue PSTn and also better in my experience than ISDN. This is using the older codecs like g711 though. The new high definition codecs like g722 are faaaaar better than any of the aforementioned and it sounds literally like your in the same room as the person. Just make sure you have a good rotuer that support QoS. An old PC with pfsense would do the trick.


G722 is no good if everyone you call is on POTs, ISDN, G729, G711 or mobiles . I do admit that G711 VOIP calls is way better than POTs but no better than ISDN..




Regards,

Old3eyes

2216 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 223

Subscriber

  Reply # 556899 12-Dec-2011 12:48 Send private message

Cisco do a phone system for Small Business that combines PSTN and VOIP. We trialled one for a while and it was great (we dont need a PABX, but if we did, this would be a great system). You can get phones that plug into a LAN port, or they do WiFi ones as well if you have a location that does not have a cable to it. It includes all the bells and whitles and is pretty easy to set up.
see http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps11388/index.html
Probably not the cheapest, but it works well.

3015 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 197

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 556914 12-Dec-2011 13:03 Send private message

philelvey: Hi Vroom,

I can't speak for the other providers of course, but you can never guarantee VoIP will be perfect 100% of the time.  The major factor influencing the quality of the service, is the quality and reliability of your internet connection.  

If you have a good and reliable connection then the quality of your VoIP lines will generally be great, and you'll have little issues.  Fibre is by far the best internet connection to run on.  Lots of our customers use ADSL, but it comes with a disclaimer that it's a best effort service.

If you need 100% quality/reliability and don't want to go down the fibre road, you're best to stick with traditional technologies. If you have a good ADSL connection and are willing to cope with occasional down-time, then VoIP could still work for you

Cheers 


This is why I'd go for a hosted or cloud/VPS option for your PBX - if your internet connection ever goes down you can simply set each extension to forward to the person's cellphone and your callers would be none the wiser.

The other thing of course is with something like PFsense to have a failover 3g modem so even if your DSL does go down you can just fall straight across in a matter of seconds.


And yes true with G722 that not many callers can receive calls yet. But its great for internal company calls between our 4 sites ;) 





204 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 1

Trusted
WorldxChange

  Reply # 556942 12-Dec-2011 13:49 Send private message

+1 for the Cisco UC320, simple little system and you own the hardware, personally and this is my personal opinion and not that of my employer, is that when you own the IPBX it is easier to be flexible with providers, if they are not delivering the service that you require, you can get a new SIP trunk provider, all of your internal settings will stay the same, all of your voicemail/PIN's will remain the same.

You can also still get the same fail over features off to Cellphone via SIP trunking, so again if your PABX went away calls could simply forward to your mobiles.  There are a host of different options out there these days and it really pays to read up on and get familiar with each one, I wish there was a simple "this is the best option" but each customer has their own needs/requirements.

Cheers

Josh

 




861 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 9

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 556951 12-Dec-2011 14:00 Send private message

Just came back from a Cisco 320 Training and I would +1 on it too. Very intuative.
Took me 45 mins from opening the box to having it all up and running.




Hmmmm

805 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 62

UberGroup

  Reply # 556958 12-Dec-2011 14:12 Send private message

cisconz: Just came back from a Cisco 320 Training and I would +1 on it too. Very intuative.
Took me 45 mins from opening the box to having it all up and running.


Says the guy with cisco in his username :P


IP PBX's are tricky things, You have to keep someone on the payroll who understands it well and knows how to fix things or have a company that will do a support contract for it. I've seen a number of complete disasters where a company had tried the cheap/in-house path for SIP PBX's and it's been messy - It's normally fine until the person that keeps it running leaves.

For the small amount of lines you are talking about it's better to go with either a "hosted" vPBX or have one installed and maintained by a 3rd party, It might sting a little in the monthly fees but it's better than having a major key-man problem with the company phone lines 




Most problems are the result of previous solutions...

All comment's I make are my own personal opinion and do not in any way, shape or form reflect the views of current or former employers unless specifically stated 

861 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 9

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 556991 12-Dec-2011 14:46 Send private message

Beccara: Says the guy with cisco in his username :P


True, but that was a nickname at highschool.
For the record I currently have no cisco qualifications.




Hmmmm



25 posts

Geek


  Reply # 556992 12-Dec-2011 14:47 Send private message

Any idea of cost for the Cisco 320? Have found them at Ipcomms but no price. Just a ballpark idea so I know whether it's an option or not. Thanks for the input too, much appreciated.

3bit.com
5887 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 194

Moderator
Trusted
Subscriber

Reply # 557009 12-Dec-2011 15:02 Send private message

cisconz: For the record I currently have no clue/qualifications.


Fixed the quote to be more accurate Tongue Out

Ah much better.




861 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 9

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 557019 12-Dec-2011 15:21 Send private message

vroom: Any idea of cost for the Cisco 320? Have found them at Ipcomms but no price. Just a ballpark idea so I know whether it's an option or not. Thanks for the input too, much appreciated.

Around $1k plus $2-500 per handset

nate: Fixed the quote to be more accurate.

Ah much better. 


Hmmmmmm




Hmmmm

 1 | 2 | 3
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic




Twitter »
Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





Trending now »

Hot discussions in our forums right now:

Speed limit when overtaking? Teach me please.
Created by nakedmolerat, last reply by Hobchild on 25-Oct-2014 19:13 (87 replies)
Pages... 4 5 6


House Auctions
Created by t0ny, last reply by joker97 on 25-Oct-2014 19:20 (38 replies)
Pages... 2 3


VDSL, which router/modem sub $200?
Created by TeaLeaf, last reply by NonprayingMantis on 25-Oct-2014 19:48 (28 replies)
Pages... 2


Neon - Sky's new streaming service
Created by JarrodM, last reply by JimmyH on 25-Oct-2014 17:37 (29 replies)
Pages... 2


iPad Air 2 and iPad Mini 3. Gonna get one?
Created by Dingbatt, last reply by alasta on 25-Oct-2014 12:30 (114 replies)
Pages... 6 7 8


5Ghz AP recommendations?
Created by ubergeeknz, last reply by sbiddle on 24-Oct-2014 12:42 (12 replies)

Snap have failed our company!
Created by dafman, last reply by kornflake on 23-Oct-2014 17:41 (37 replies)
Pages... 2 3


Thief taunts 12 year old via stolen laptop
Created by macuser, last reply by charsleysa on 22-Oct-2014 23:49 (12 replies)


Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.

Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.