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  Reply # 1333883 30-Jun-2015 09:22 One person supports this post Send private message

Geektastic:
keewee01:
xpd:
DarthKermit: Whatever you do, don't try to sell tickets on TradeMe


Wow, Ive seen some riled up TM users before but not to that level :D




Wow - that is a lot of hate!

Anyone who was genuine about having surplus tickets would only sell them for enough over the original purchase price to cover their costs. (Ticket price, Ticketek fees, delivery fee, TradeMe/Success fees)

Anything else is scalping!


What's wrong with scalping though? Why is it any different from hotels jacking rates when events are on, or a retailer increasing the cost of any rare item that there is high demand for?

We seem to have a belief that tickets are somehow 'special'.

What does annoy me is when events are cancelled, Ticketek et al will only refund the original buyer, not the person who is the current legal owner of the ticket. That IS wrong. It is not 'illegal' or even against Ticketek rules to sell your tickets, so they should refund to people sending/bringing genuine physical tickets to them, not just the person whose card originally paid for them simply to make their own life easier....


You may find within Ticketek's T and C's (I havent looked) that you agree to not on-sell tickets etc, so the original buyer would potentially gain from on-sold tickets to a cancelled event..... its the risk you take buying second hand.





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  Reply # 1333890 30-Jun-2015 09:27 Send private message

It would be too hard to prove, but I have no problem with selling tickets to the highest bidder if your reasons for not going are legitimate, like due to illness, your work gives you better seats etc...but seeing scumbags selling tickets minutes after the event sold out, and having like 8 available, is just wrong.

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  Reply # 1333895 30-Jun-2015 09:32 One person supports this post Send private message

Geektastic:
keewee01:
xpd:
DarthKermit: Whatever you do, don't try to sell tickets on TradeMe


Wow, Ive seen some riled up TM users before but not to that level :D




Wow - that is a lot of hate!

Anyone who was genuine about having surplus tickets would only sell them for enough over the original purchase price to cover their costs. (Ticket price, Ticketek fees, delivery fee, TradeMe/Success fees)

Anything else is scalping!


What's wrong with scalping though? Why is it any different from hotels jacking rates when events are on, or a retailer increasing the cost of any rare item that there is high demand for?

We seem to have a belief that tickets are somehow 'special'.

What does annoy me is when events are cancelled, Ticketek et al will only refund the original buyer, not the person who is the current legal owner of the ticket. That IS wrong. It is not 'illegal' or even against Ticketek rules to sell your tickets, so they should refund to people sending/bringing genuine physical tickets to them, not just the person whose card originally paid for them simply to make their own life easier....


Different issue - scalpers are buying tickets for the purpose of reducing supply then selling them on at a markup, they do not control ticket prices for first sale, nor do they control supply. What you see is people buying 10+ tickets for $20 each then selling those on, which pisses off people who just want to buy tickets to go, rather than just buying 2 to sell on.

On one hand, supply and demand - if people are willing to pay these prices then people will set at those prices. People are dicks.

Airlines/Hotels directly control the price AND the supply (within limits) and will usually do what they need to to maximise profit without pissing off the consumers too much. They are a business out there to make a profit, we expect that behaviour.

As far as Ticketek - absolutely fine with only refunding the original purchaser. It serves as a mild deterrent to scalping and should help curb the grey market. Expecting a refund on a scalped ticket is hilarious.


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  Reply # 1333896 30-Jun-2015 09:32 One person supports this post Send private message

I don't know that have a huge issue with scalping. How is it any different to buying any other limited run product with the intention of making a profit because of the scarcity of the goods? Joe Public has just as much chance of getting the tickets as the scalpers do.

And even in the instance that someone may have bought tickets and then legitimately needed to sell some (e.g. if them and their friends were both trying and they ended up with twice as many as they needed), why should they do a buy now of the original price? I wouldn't sell something for $20 if the market is willing to pay $500. I see nothing wrong with doing a $1 reserve and letting the market decide.




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  Reply # 1333900 30-Jun-2015 09:36 Send private message

Paul1977: I don't know that have a huge issue with scalping. How is it any different to buying any other limited run product with the intention of making a profit because of the scarcity of the goods? Joe Public has just as much chance of getting the tickets as the scalpers do.

And even in the instance that someone may have bought tickets and then legitimately needed to sell some (e.g. if them and their friends were both trying and they ended up with twice as many as they needed), why should they do a buy now of the original price? I wouldn't sell something for $20 if the market is willing to pay $500. I see nothing wrong with doing a $1 reserve and letting the market decide.


Because it is against the terms and conditons of the original ticket sale - and why should X profit heavily because they were lucky enough to double up on tickets when Y missed out entirely?



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  Reply # 1333905 30-Jun-2015 09:41 Send private message

Geektastic:
keewee01:
xpd:
DarthKermit: Whatever you do, don't try to sell tickets on TradeMe


Wow, Ive seen some riled up TM users before but not to that level :D




Wow - that is a lot of hate!

Anyone who was genuine about having surplus tickets would only sell them for enough over the original purchase price to cover their costs. (Ticket price, Ticketek fees, delivery fee, TradeMe/Success fees)

Anything else is scalping!


What's wrong with scalping though? Why is it any different from hotels jacking rates when events are on, or a retailer increasing the cost of any rare item that there is high demand for?

We seem to have a belief that tickets are somehow 'special'.

What does annoy me is when events are cancelled, Ticketek et al will only refund the original buyer, not the person who is the current legal owner of the ticket. That IS wrong. It is not 'illegal' or even against Ticketek rules to sell your tickets, so they should refund to people sending/bringing genuine physical tickets to them, not just the person whose card originally paid for them simply to make their own life easier....


Completely different senarios! Consumers controlling the price rather than the company behind the event.

And scalping is just wrong because the greed of some people just make a bad situation worse!

It is against Ticketek's tickets T&C's to resell your tickets a). without obtaining Ticketeks permissions, and b). at a premium price
Are you saying that it is completely OK to break the ticket conditions from the onset?


Wellington Rugby should set up a system where by tickets bought online you have to scan the ticket and swipe the card used to buy it to get in the game.


And I can't believe there was a seller on TM with a childs ticket and they are advocating that anyone could get in on it because they've done just that numerous times in the past! Wow - talk about dishonest!

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  Reply # 1333907 30-Jun-2015 09:45 Send private message

keewee01:
Paul1977: I don't know that have a huge issue with scalping. How is it any different to buying any other limited run product with the intention of making a profit because of the scarcity of the goods? Joe Public has just as much chance of getting the tickets as the scalpers do.

And even in the instance that someone may have bought tickets and then legitimately needed to sell some (e.g. if them and their friends were both trying and they ended up with twice as many as they needed), why should they do a buy now of the original price? I wouldn't sell something for $20 if the market is willing to pay $500. I see nothing wrong with doing a $1 reserve and letting the market decide.


Because it is against the terms and conditons of the original ticket sale - and why should X profit heavily because they were lucky enough to double up on tickets when Y missed out entirely?


I didn't realize it was actually against the terms of the sale, but I am talking more in principle anyway. It may sound unfair, and maybe it is, but why SHOULDN'T they profit from their good luck if they can?




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  Reply # 1333910 30-Jun-2015 09:50 Send private message

Paul1977:
keewee01:
Paul1977: I don't know that have a huge issue with scalping. How is it any different to buying any other limited run product with the intention of making a profit because of the scarcity of the goods? Joe Public has just as much chance of getting the tickets as the scalpers do.

And even in the instance that someone may have bought tickets and then legitimately needed to sell some (e.g. if them and their friends were both trying and they ended up with twice as many as they needed), why should they do a buy now of the original price? I wouldn't sell something for $20 if the market is willing to pay $500. I see nothing wrong with doing a $1 reserve and letting the market decide.


Because it is against the terms and conditons of the original ticket sale - and why should X profit heavily because they were lucky enough to double up on tickets when Y missed out entirely?


I didn't realize it was actually against the terms of the sale, but I am talking more in principle anyway. It may sound unfair, and maybe it is, but why SHOULDN'T they profit from their good luck if they can?


Because all those unlucky people who missed out, might not have missed out if others were not being greedy from the onsite.

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  Reply # 1333911 30-Jun-2015 09:52 One person supports this post Send private message

From http://premier.ticketek.co.nz/Content/buyers/termsofsale.aspx

Resale of tickets & scalping

 

     

  1. Tickets may not, without the prior written consent of Ticketek and the Seller, be resold or offered for resale at a premium (including via on-line auction or other unauthorised resale sites) or used for advertising, promotion or other commercial purposes (including competitions and trade promotions) or to enhance the demand for other goods or services. If a ticket is sold or used in breach of this condition, the ticket may be cancelled without a refund and the ticketholder may be refused admission. Ticketek and/or the Seller will take all reasonable steps to notify you of Ticketek's intention to cancel the ticket or render it invalid within a reasonable time before cancelling it or rendering it invalid.



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  Reply # 1333912 30-Jun-2015 09:52 One person supports this post Send private message

And an interesting question also, are those who are scalping on TradeMe for huge profit, declaring it to IRD - which you are required to do (declared addition income) if you buy something and then immediately sell it for a profit.

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  Reply # 1333913 30-Jun-2015 09:59 Send private message

keewee01:
Paul1977:
keewee01:
Paul1977: I don't know that have a huge issue with scalping. How is it any different to buying any other limited run product with the intention of making a profit because of the scarcity of the goods? Joe Public has just as much chance of getting the tickets as the scalpers do.

And even in the instance that someone may have bought tickets and then legitimately needed to sell some (e.g. if them and their friends were both trying and they ended up with twice as many as they needed), why should they do a buy now of the original price? I wouldn't sell something for $20 if the market is willing to pay $500. I see nothing wrong with doing a $1 reserve and letting the market decide.


Because it is against the terms and conditons of the original ticket sale - and why should X profit heavily because they were lucky enough to double up on tickets when Y missed out entirely?


I didn't realize it was actually against the terms of the sale, but I am talking more in principle anyway. It may sound unfair, and maybe it is, but why SHOULDN'T they profit from their good luck if they can?


Because all those unlucky people who missed out, might not have missed out if others were not being greedy from the onsite.


That is hardly a new phenomenon, but people only seems to get upset about it when it comes to event tickets.




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  Reply # 1333919 30-Jun-2015 10:07 Send private message

Paul1977:
keewee01:
Paul1977:
keewee01:
Paul1977: I don't know that have a huge issue with scalping. How is it any different to buying any other limited run product with the intention of making a profit because of the scarcity of the goods? Joe Public has just as much chance of getting the tickets as the scalpers do.

And even in the instance that someone may have bought tickets and then legitimately needed to sell some (e.g. if them and their friends were both trying and they ended up with twice as many as they needed), why should they do a buy now of the original price? I wouldn't sell something for $20 if the market is willing to pay $500. I see nothing wrong with doing a $1 reserve and letting the market decide.


Because it is against the terms and conditons of the original ticket sale - and why should X profit heavily because they were lucky enough to double up on tickets when Y missed out entirely?


I didn't realize it was actually against the terms of the sale, but I am talking more in principle anyway. It may sound unfair, and maybe it is, but why SHOULDN'T they profit from their good luck if they can?


Because all those unlucky people who missed out, might not have missed out if others were not being greedy from the onsite.


That is hardly a new phenomenon, but people only seems to get upset about it when it comes to event tickets.


True - probably because they are the most emotive.

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  Reply # 1333922 30-Jun-2015 10:09 Send private message

Paul1977:
keewee01:
Paul1977:
keewee01:
Paul1977: I don't know that have a huge issue with scalping. How is it any different to buying any other limited run product with the intention of making a profit because of the scarcity of the goods? Joe Public has just as much chance of getting the tickets as the scalpers do.

And even in the instance that someone may have bought tickets and then legitimately needed to sell some (e.g. if them and their friends were both trying and they ended up with twice as many as they needed), why should they do a buy now of the original price? I wouldn't sell something for $20 if the market is willing to pay $500. I see nothing wrong with doing a $1 reserve and letting the market decide.


Because it is against the terms and conditons of the original ticket sale - and why should X profit heavily because they were lucky enough to double up on tickets when Y missed out entirely?


I didn't realize it was actually against the terms of the sale, but I am talking more in principle anyway. It may sound unfair, and maybe it is, but why SHOULDN'T they profit from their good luck if they can?


Because all those unlucky people who missed out, might not have missed out if others were not being greedy from the onsite.


That is hardly a new phenomenon, but people only seems to get upset about it when it comes to event tickets.

I've found people feel the same when it comes to flipping anything that is limited edition. Of course, not everyone can get one, but that doesn't make it OK to be dick, by buying more than you need/want just to on-sell at a profit. Just because you can be a dick and make some money, doesn't mean you should, imo.

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  Reply # 1333923 30-Jun-2015 10:10 One person supports this post Send private message

Surely no one expected Ticketek's site to cope with the demand did they? The same thing happens every time something really popular goes on sale.



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  Reply # 1333925 30-Jun-2015 10:14 Send private message

invisibleman18: Surely no one expected Ticketek's site to cope with the demand did they? The same thing happens every time something really popular goes on sale.


You would hope that as a business they would learn from their weeknesses and fix them!

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