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Topic # 111537 6-Nov-2012 21:30 Send private message

I am about to start building a house around 190m from a vdsl2 cabinet.

Wanting to know how I can make the house ready for VDSL2 once it is completed so I do not have to pay any large connection fees.

Also is there a better type of copper I should specify that is better than standard when connecting to the roadside?

Not getting UFB for some time at the address so VDSL2 will have to do.

Thanks


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  Reply # 713192 6-Nov-2012 21:38 Send private message

Hi, the cable from the house to the pillar on the street front can only be standard 2pair leadin. Within the house use cat5e or cat6 and install a master filter (VDSL2 rated) if you want to take both DSL and POTS services. Obviously there is the expected cat5e or cat6 structured cabling recommendations that EVERY new house should include.

VDSL2 like ADSL2+ is designed to work on standard cat3 or lesser telco phone cabling, so the telecom spec 2pair coming in from the street is just fine and if its as close as you say you should get good VDSL2 performance. You could have external rated cat5e installed to the street, but Telecom may refuse to use it, and the advantage on such a short run may be minimal.

Cyril

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  Reply # 713209 6-Nov-2012 21:55 Send private message

Per cyril's post, you need a VDSL2 splitter/master filter which gets wired into the point where the telecom cable comes from the street to the house.

At that point you need to decide on where you want the DSL jackpoint, and whether you want internal cabling. If it were me I would pick a cupboard for the DSL jackpoint, and have 2x cat5e (or 6) cabling from various points in the house back to a patch panel in the cupboard.

I don't know how 'connection fees' work for new lines, but ordinary on existing phone lines the maximum connection fee you would pay for VDSL2 is $402.50 AFAIK.



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  Reply # 713225 6-Nov-2012 22:20 Send private message

Thanks for the replys,

I will be wiring up the house with full cat6e with an 8 port in a cupboard so might put the dsl line there.

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  Reply # 713230 6-Nov-2012 22:30 Send private message

Stan: Thanks for the replys,

I will be wiring up the house with full cat6e with an 8 port in a cupboard so might put the dsl line there.


You'll want more than 8 ports. I would say at least 24 ports for most 3 bedroom houses almost these days. Best to run 2 cables to every point and some spots like where you think the tv should go, 4 cables. WIll you be having an internal garage as that may be the place to put your patch panel? Also I would recommend installing conduit from the street to your ETP as per Telecom spec and a conduit from the ETP (where the cable comes into the house) to your patch panel with draw wire so when fibre comes you can put the ONT next to your patch panel.







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  Reply # 713259 6-Nov-2012 23:05 Send private message

Zeon:
Stan: Thanks for the replys,

I will be wiring up the house with full cat6e with an 8 port in a cupboard so might put the dsl line there.


You'll want more than 8 ports. I would say at least 24 ports for most 3 bedroom houses almost these days. Best to run 2 cables to every point and some spots like where you think the tv should go, 4 cables. WIll you be having an internal garage as that may be the place to put your patch panel? Also I would recommend installing conduit from the street to your ETP as per Telecom spec and a conduit from the ETP (where the cable comes into the house) to your patch panel with draw wire so when fibre comes you can put the ONT next to your patch panel.


Yes indeed I was thinking of perhaps a 16 will go in the cupboard by room 2 (see plan).

24 port seems like an over kill.



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  Reply # 713275 6-Nov-2012 23:39 Send private message

Stan:
Zeon:
Stan: Thanks for the replys,

I will be wiring up the house with full cat6e with an 8 port in a cupboard so might put the dsl line there.


You'll want more than 8 ports. I would say at least 24 ports for most 3 bedroom houses almost these days. Best to run 2 cables to every point and some spots like where you think the tv should go, 4 cables. WIll you be having an internal garage as that may be the place to put your patch panel? Also I would recommend installing conduit from the street to your ETP as per Telecom spec and a conduit from the ETP (where the cable comes into the house) to your patch panel with draw wire so when fibre comes you can put the ONT next to your patch panel.


Yes indeed I was thinking of perhaps a 16 will go in the cupboard by room 2 (see plan).

24 port seems like an over kill.




Looks like a nice house :) - but why the separate room for the shower?

Yea 16 should be OK. The de facto standard is to run into the garage so while the cable runs will be longer it is more standardized rather than next to bed2. Maybe near the electric panel? You should also make sure you have coax running to that point too as well as 2-3 feeds to the roof (of coax).

If you put it on one of the external facing walls of the garage it may be easier than running conduit for when fibre comes but up to you.





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  Reply # 713307 7-Nov-2012 07:02 Send private message

You say cat6e, I assume you mean 5e, there is no 6e, or if someone sells you such a product then its not an internationally recognised standard it is working to.

As others have pointed out, you need to run coax as well as UTP (Cat5e or 6), either place a patch panel on the garage wall above where the demarc//ETP is sighted or place it somewhere in the house thats more central, but run two cat5e from the demarc to that cabinet, and allow for access to those runs from on the inside of the house above the demarc so that the ONT can be placed there and can feed the patch panel elsewhere in the house. The alternative is to run a 32mm conduit from the ETP to the panel so Chorus can pull the fibre all the way, but to be honest its easier to site the ONT on the garage wall and patch panel where suits. dont forget a power point for the ONT where ever it may end up.

That all said, your house does not have much opportunity for cabinet locations elsewhere so an inwall cabinet (ST3610) on the outside garage wall (most left is my guess) where the meter/power/demarc will end up should be fine.

I used to be keen on two outlets or more in every room but now am more incline to provide better wireless coverage but still wired outlets to AV and office/study areas. So I recommend a following guide.

1x data plus 1x RG6 to the rear of all wall mounted TV's (including bedroom TVs)

2x data and 3x RG6 to all major AV locations, plus 2x HDMI to any wall mounted TVs above that AV location (plus 1xdata/1xRG6 to that wall mounted TV as mentioned previously assuming it is wall mounted)

2 to 4x data to study/office areas, depending on the layout I normally provide 2 face plates with 2 data on each one for computer and phone on desk, and others for a network printer and maybe NAS device that may be on the same bench or on an adjacent wall depending on layout.

1x data bedside bed in masterbedroom, plus previously mentioned wall mounted TV data/RG6.

2x data in top of pantry for AP/Router for wireless to cover main living area, I say two to allow for this to be the primary NAT router, so you can deliver WAN (be it ethernet from ONT or xDSL from phone line) to the router and return the LAN to the patch panel for distribution via the patch panel switch. Obviously if it makes sense to have your entire patch panel in top of the pantry then these two outlets are not required. The pantry is ideal in small houses/apartments for the patch panel, although often to the dismay of the pantry administrator.

1x data in the top of the hall closet to provide for an extra AP to cover bedroom areas.

1x data on Kitchen bench for possible phone.

I also recommend that you just leave all coax runs at a suitable location in the ceiling space, ideally not too far from the man holes for easy access, and make sure a power point is there for any amplifiers.

Cyril



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  Reply # 713855 7-Nov-2012 21:56 Send private message

Zeon:
Stan:
Zeon:
Stan: Thanks for the replys,

I will be wiring up the house with full cat6e with an 8 port in a cupboard so might put the dsl line there.


You'll want more than 8 ports. I would say at least 24 ports for most 3 bedroom houses almost these days. Best to run 2 cables to every point and some spots like where you think the tv should go, 4 cables. WIll you be having an internal garage as that may be the place to put your patch panel? Also I would recommend installing conduit from the street to your ETP as per Telecom spec and a conduit from the ETP (where the cable comes into the house) to your patch panel with draw wire so when fibre comes you can put the ONT next to your patch panel.


Yes indeed I was thinking of perhaps a 16 will go in the cupboard by room 2 (see plan).

24 port seems like an over kill.




Looks like a nice house :) - but why the separate room for the shower?

Yea 16 should be OK. The de facto standard is to run into the garage so while the cable runs will be longer it is more standardized rather than next to bed2. Maybe near the electric panel? You should also make sure you have coax running to that point too as well as 2-3 feeds to the roof (of coax).

If you put it on one of the external facing walls of the garage it may be easier than running conduit for when fibre comes but up to you.


Thanks designed it myself considering my budget and requirements I think I did well

Separate shower is just so multiple people can use the bathroom and not interrupt anyone else doing other things its a bachelor geek pad :) 

Perhaps I could put some shelving in the garage I know its the standard but is there much advantage rather than the top of the closet in the house. Garage in unlined owing to budget constraints would that make a difference?

cyril7: You say cat6e, I assume you mean 5e, there is no 6e, or if someone sells you such a product then its not an internationally recognised standard it is working to. 

As others have pointed out, you need to run coax as well as UTP (Cat5e or 6), either place a patch panel on the garage wall above where the demarc//ETP is sighted or place it somewhere in the house thats more central, but run two cat5e from the demarc to that cabinet, and allow for access to those runs from on the inside of the house above the demarc so that the ONT can be placed there and can feed the patch panel elsewhere in the house. The alternative is to run a 32mm conduit from the ETP to the panel so Chorus can pull the fibre all the way, but to be honest its easier to site the ONT on the garage wall and patch panel where suits. dont forget a power point for the ONT where ever it may end up. 

That all said, your house does not have much opportunity for cabinet locations elsewhere so an inwall cabinet (ST3610) on the outside garage wall (most left is my guess) where the meter/power/demarc will end up should be fine. 

I used to be keen on two outlets or more in every room but now am more incline to provide better wireless coverage but still wired outlets to AV and office/study areas. So I recommend a following guide. 

1x data plus 1x RG6 to the rear of all wall mounted TV's (including bedroom TVs) 

2x data and 3x RG6 to all major AV locations, plus 2x HDMI to any wall mounted TVs above that AV location (plus 1xdata/1xRG6 to that wall mounted TV as mentioned previously assuming it is wall mounted) 

2 to 4x data to study/office areas, depending on the layout I normally provide 2 face plates with 2 data on each one for computer and phone on desk, and others for a network printer and maybe NAS device that may be on the same bench or on an adjacent wall depending on layout.

1x data bedside bed in masterbedroom, plus previously mentioned wall mounted TV data/RG6. 

2x data in top of pantry for AP/Router for wireless to cover main living area, I say two to allow for this to be the primary NAT router, so you can deliver WAN (be it ethernet from ONT or xDSL from phone line) to the router and return the LAN to the patch panel for distribution via the patch panel switch. Obviously if it makes sense to have your entire patch panel in top of the pantry then these two outlets are not required. The pantry is ideal in small houses/apartments for the patch panel, although often to the dismay of the pantry administrator.

1x data in the top of the hall closet to provide for an extra AP to cover bedroom areas. 

1x data on Kitchen bench for possible phone.

I also recommend that you just leave all coax runs at a suitable location in the ceiling space, ideally not too far from the man holes for easy access, and make sure a power point is there for any amplifiers. 

Cyril


Yes sorry I ment cat6 I seem to be a victim of marketing :/

Good guide! I am installing the networking gear myself I had something like this in mind myself

Thanks Again

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  Reply # 713897 8-Nov-2012 00:48 Send private message

I was discussing something similar like this with a friend at uni who is building a house (hes in his 40's), he was telling me about his plans to network his house, he went like this:

Living room: - 2 network behind tv, 2 coax behind tv, 1 network on the corner opposite the tv behind a couch, 1 along another wall behind a couch. This allowed room for him to slightly reconfigure if he wanted to add a desk later, or if he wants to use wired while at the couch.

Bedrooms 1 & 2(childs): - 2 network behind a desk, 1 network and 1 coax in a corner for possibility of tv later, and 1 network next to the bed with a power outlet next to that. This allows them to use data wired in bed.

Master room: 2 network behind tv, 2 coax behind tv, 1 network either side of the bed with power outlets for in bed wired data.

Study: 4 network behind desk, 1 next to every other power outlet in that room.

kitchen: data next to a counter where the phone will go, incase of upgrades later down the track

dining: data next to a power outlet in the corner incase of upgrades too.

It may seem like over kill, but he said that this is your one chance to do it easily, so do it right and dont skimp out, you dont know what you'll need later.






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  Reply # 713910 8-Nov-2012 07:20 Send private message

Also a data point or two in ceiling space. Great for mounting a wireless AP.




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