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Topic # 113672 23-Jan-2013 22:26 Send private message

So when I'm transferring items over from my lounge pc to my office pc via WiFi through my home network, the speeds are like 300-400 kbps..(Am using Hamachi and Network explorer on Windows.) Yes, you may say that because I am over WiFi, things tend to be slow.. but should it be this slow? I mean, both computers are not even far from the router (it is in between the two computers). My router is a Netgear DGND3700. And besides, my internet speed is way faster, so shouldn't my WiFi LAN speeds be a bit more faster than my internet speeds since it is "in my network"?




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BDFL
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  Reply # 749902 23-Jan-2013 22:33 Send private message

Both PCs are in the same LAN then (as in both connected to the same router LAN ports or WiFi)? If they are then WAN speed has no influence in this setup at all.

Why are you using Hamachi?

Hamachi will encrypt the data before sending, which is also encrypted over wireless again. We have no idea if there is any interference around the area.

Your best speed will be achieved with ethernet in both sides and no Hamachi in the middle.







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  Reply # 749905 23-Jan-2013 22:40 Send private message

freitasm: Both PCs are in the same LAN then (as in both connected to the same router LAN ports or WiFi)? If they are then WAN speed has no influence in this setup at all.

Why are you using Hamachi?

Hamachi will encrypt the data before sending, which is also encrypted over wireless again. We have no idea if there is any interference around the area.

Your best speed will be achieved with ethernet in both sides and no Hamachi in the middle.



Yes, as I said above, they [the pcs] are connected via WiFi. I was mentioning WAN speeds because they seem to be faster than my LAN speeds, but theoretically it should be the other way around?

I was using Hamachi to see if speeds would be faster.. but since you mentioned encryption with Hamachi, I won't use it for LAN. I also used the regular Windows Explorer transfer method, but again, same 300-400kbps speeds.

Is there a way around ethernet? Please? I mean, everything will obviously work 10 times better wired, but since I can't/don't want to run wires across the floors etc, I'd prefer to use wireless for now.. And since we have a laptop, that must go wireless. 

So all I am saying is why is transfer speeds on Windows Explorer, to another pc in the same LAN, so ridiculously slow? 

Thanks very much!




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  Reply # 749908 23-Jan-2013 22:46 Send private message

No reason to use Hamachi inside your LAN at all. It will slow things down for no good reason at all. Hamachi is to be used when connecting PCs in different LANs, over the Internet - it's a VPN. As I said it will encrypt the traffic and slow down things.

Install Teracopy and copy the files again. Teracopy will give you a better speed information - and might be a bit faster.




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  Reply # 749910 23-Jan-2013 22:47 Send private message

Encrypted WiFi?
Encrypted VPN?

There is overhead for encryption in terms of transfer speed, and you are doing it twice.

Forget Hamachi for LAN work, physically bring two computers to the router, plug them in with cables, disable the WiFi, and run a transfer between PCs, and you should see a big difference.




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  Reply # 749916 23-Jan-2013 22:55 Send private message

freitasm: No reason to use Hamachi inside your LAN at all. It will slow things down for no good reason at all. Hamachi is to be used when connecting PCs in different LANs, over the Internet - it's a VPN. As I said it will encrypt the traffic and slow down things.

Install Teracopy and copy the files again. Teracopy will give you a better speed information - and might be a bit faster.


Does the "Power Off" work? Or do I need to manually disable the Network adapter (Hamachi)?

Will try Teracopy..




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  Reply # 749918 23-Jan-2013 22:58 Send private message

Map the drives using the LAN IP address and you bypass Hamachi.




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  Reply # 749926 23-Jan-2013 23:12 Send private message

I get around 6MB/s transferring files using FTP across my WiFi from my laptop to my Media Centre Box. I have a Rocket M2 WiFi running WPA2-PSK in B/G/N mixed mode (have some older devices that still connect)

At 400kps i'd be pulling my hair out. Every time I clear photos from the SLR or HD Camcorder i'm shifting around 8GB. Shifting 8GB at 400k would take me what, two days? :O




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  Reply # 749931 23-Jan-2013 23:25 Send private message

Regs: I get around 6MB/s transferring files using FTP across my WiFi from my laptop to my Media Centre Box. I have a Rocket M2 WiFi running WPA2-PSK in B/G/N mixed mode (have some older devices that still connect)

At 400kps i'd be pulling my hair out. Every time I clear photos from the SLR or HD Camcorder i'm shifting around 8GB. Shifting 8GB at 400k would take me what, two days? :O


That (in bold) is what I'm about to do! lol.






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  Reply # 749932 23-Jan-2013 23:25 Send private message

freitasm: Map the drives using the LAN IP address and you bypass Hamachi.


Okey Dokey! 






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  Reply # 749935 23-Jan-2013 23:31 Send private message

Regs: I get around 6MB/s transferring files using FTP across my WiFi from my laptop to my Media Centre Box. I have a Rocket M2 WiFi running WPA2-PSK in B/G/N mixed mode (have some older devices that still connect)

At 400kps i'd be pulling my hair out. Every time I clear photos from the SLR or HD Camcorder i'm shifting around 8GB. Shifting 8GB at 400k would take me what, two days? :O


Just wondering, how is your FTP set up?




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  Reply # 749938 23-Jan-2013 23:43 Send private message

sonyxperiageek:

Yes, as I said above, they [the pcs] are connected via WiFi. I was mentioning WAN speeds because they seem to be faster than my LAN speeds, but theoretically it should be the other way around?

I was using Hamachi to see if speeds would be faster.. but since you mentioned encryption with Hamachi, I won't use it for LAN. I also used the regular Windows Explorer transfer method, but again, same 300-400kbps speeds.

Is there a way around ethernet? Please? I mean, everything will obviously work 10 times better wired, but since I can't/don't want to run wires across the floors etc, I'd prefer to use wireless for now.. And since we have a laptop, that must go wireless. 

So all I am saying is why is transfer speeds on Windows Explorer, to another pc in the same LAN, so ridiculously slow? 

Thanks very much!



When transferring between two wireless devices via an access point, there's half the bandwidth gone already. The AP stores a packet from say PC1, then forwards back out over wireless to PC2. While PC2 is receiving, PC1 can't be transmitting. It's only half-duplex (one way conversation to any device and only one at a time like a crappy old HUB) and the AP is a store and forward repeater. So two PC's half the throughput, compared with one PC's packets going straight to and from the AP and out the WAN port instead of back out the wireless side could explain faster WAN speed slower wi-fi device to wi-fi device with AP as the middle man.

In saying that, 400KB is terrible! Have you tried changing channels on your access point/wireless router? There could be an analogue video sender or something else nearby causing interference.

If you absolutely can't use a network cable, you could temporarily run an ad-hoc network on both file transfer devices and bypass the AP in doing so, this will increase bandwidth. But try changing wireless channels if you can.



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  Reply # 749948 24-Jan-2013 00:04 Send private message

kiwirock:
sonyxperiageek:

Yes, as I said above, they [the pcs] are connected via WiFi. I was mentioning WAN speeds because they seem to be faster than my LAN speeds, but theoretically it should be the other way around?

I was using Hamachi to see if speeds would be faster.. but since you mentioned encryption with Hamachi, I won't use it for LAN. I also used the regular Windows Explorer transfer method, but again, same 300-400kbps speeds.

Is there a way around ethernet? Please? I mean, everything will obviously work 10 times better wired, but since I can't/don't want to run wires across the floors etc, I'd prefer to use wireless for now.. And since we have a laptop, that must go wireless. 

So all I am saying is why is transfer speeds on Windows Explorer, to another pc in the same LAN, so ridiculously slow? 

Thanks very much!



When transferring between two wireless devices via an access point, there's half the bandwidth gone already. The AP stores a packet from say PC1, then forwards back out over wireless to PC2. While PC2 is receiving, PC1 can't be transmitting. It's only half-duplex (one way conversation to any device and only one at a time like a crappy old HUB) and the AP is a store and forward repeater. So two PC's half the throughput, compared with one PC's packets going straight to and from the AP and out the WAN port instead of back out the wireless side could explain faster WAN speed slower wi-fi device to wi-fi device with AP as the middle man.

In saying that, 400KB is terrible! Have you tried changing channels on your access point/wireless router? There could be an analogue video sender or something else nearby causing interference.

If you absolutely can't use a network cable, you could temporarily run an ad-hoc network on both file transfer devices and bypass the AP in doing so, this will increase bandwidth. But try changing wireless channels if you can.


But wouldn't the "packets" go to and from the ap and out the WAN have to travel further through the outside underground wires, to the exchange, and if the traffic is international, out through to the other side of the world, then back again if receiving? Wouldn't that take longer than a PC that has to go a few metres?

And also, 400KB /s would be about 3200kbps, which is about 8 times better than what I currently have - 400Kbps.






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  Reply # 749949 24-Jan-2013 00:07 Send private message

kiwirock:
sonyxperiageek:

Yes, as I said above, they [the pcs] are connected via WiFi. I was mentioning WAN speeds because they seem to be faster than my LAN speeds, but theoretically it should be the other way around?

I was using Hamachi to see if speeds would be faster.. but since you mentioned encryption with Hamachi, I won't use it for LAN. I also used the regular Windows Explorer transfer method, but again, same 300-400kbps speeds.

Is there a way around ethernet? Please? I mean, everything will obviously work 10 times better wired, but since I can't/don't want to run wires across the floors etc, I'd prefer to use wireless for now.. And since we have a laptop, that must go wireless. 

So all I am saying is why is transfer speeds on Windows Explorer, to another pc in the same LAN, so ridiculously slow? 

Thanks very much!



When transferring between two wireless devices via an access point, there's half the bandwidth gone already. The AP stores a packet from say PC1, then forwards back out over wireless to PC2. While PC2 is receiving, PC1 can't be transmitting. It's only half-duplex (one way conversation to any device and only one at a time like a crappy old HUB) and the AP is a store and forward repeater. So two PC's half the throughput, compared with one PC's packets going straight to and from the AP and out the WAN port instead of back out the wireless side could explain faster WAN speed slower wi-fi device to wi-fi device with AP as the middle man.

In saying that, 400KB is terrible! Have you tried changing channels on your access point/wireless router? There could be an analogue video sender or something else nearby causing interference.

If you absolutely can't use a network cable, you could temporarily run an ad-hoc network on both file transfer devices and bypass the AP in doing so, this will increase bandwidth. But try changing wireless channels if you can.


That's why I have a 300Mbps router, but even then, I wouldn't be getting the full advertised rate.. Undecided




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  Reply # 750002 24-Jan-2013 09:05 Send private message

I'd like to see more info that narrows down the cause.

Your slow throughput on copying is not necessarily a wireless issue so I'd use a cable to check that ethernet throughput is not constrained as well.

What is your wireless configuration: Are both PCs running wireless N? If not, what are they running?
If N, is the router configured to N-only and are you using both bands for N?

How many wireless networks can you see from your PC?






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  Reply # 752160 28-Jan-2013 18:18 Send private message

I have had this happen before when I was using 802.11n and one device was G only. Fiddling with the protection options on the router and the N capable device got the speeds up heaps.

Wish that old laptops didnt have stupid bios locks about what mini pci card you could fit to them, or I would have put a cheap A/B/G/N card in to replace the horrid dell G only card.




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