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  Reply # 401211 6-Nov-2010 18:25 Send private message

alliao: http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/crime/4315276/Kiwis-heavy-users-of-child-porn-website

yay. now whoever speaks against the filter is a pedo!

Just as when Telecom first introduced 10GB traffic limit whoever spoke against it is a "net vampire".



Citation needed. IIRC, "net vampires" was a reference to people using terabytes when on Telecom's managed plan. Co




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  Reply # 401241 6-Nov-2010 22:05 Send private message

freitasm:Citation needed. IIRC, "net vampires" was a reference to people using terabytes when on Telecom's managed plan. Co


Hm, I can no longer find the article on NZ Herald, but I still have the URL from one of my ancient chatlogs :)

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/storydisplay.cfm?storyID=1392324&thesection=technology&thesubsection=general

Any idea how I can find that article? 

Anyway, IIRC it was talking about users d/l and u/l at full speed all day everyday on home connections. Internet addiction etc, the connection at the time was 128kbps so I doubt it was into the TB range. As it's technically impossible to reach such amount.

Even if you were on 512kbps connections (u'd be pretty 1337 back then) it'd amount to 150GB/month, don't think we have 5Mbps connections back then.

http://slashdot.org/yro/02/04/17/0537252.shtml?tid=95 still works, I think it was around the same time as the article. So Telecom was obviously under a lot of pressure, maybe the users were costing them a LOT more than they imagined.

Just my memories from that era :P almost 10yrs ago!

 

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  Reply # 401254 6-Nov-2010 22:37 Send private message

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/technology/news/article.cfm?c_id=5&objectid=1792324

found this link, but it's getting really off topic...

http://stopthefilter.org.nz/content/what-you-can-do

I suppose that's all we can really do. Alternatively, we can always try the "follow the money" route, by finding out what companies are employed to install such service, because I do assume all that's involved are not stupid people, and profiting from tax payers are usually met with least resistance. The ability to install a filter that is "aimed" to accommodate filtering entire NZ's internet traffic can not be some random Joel Bloggs you pickup from a street corner.


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  Reply # 404920 15-Nov-2010 15:50 Send private message

the filter will just mean most people will probably use vpn's now and the government will find it harder to stop cyber crime.

i guess there could be a business opportunity for someone to start up a new isp called 'freedom isp' that has no filter and sticks up for human rights. 

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  Reply # 408833 24-Nov-2010 11:48 Send private message

alliao: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/technology/news/article.cfm?c_id=5&objectid=1792324

found this link, but it's getting really off topic...

http://stopthefilter.org.nz/content/what-you-can-do

I suppose that's all we can really do. Alternatively, we can always try the "follow the money" route, by finding out what companies are employed to install such service, because I do assume all that's involved are not stupid people, and profiting from tax payers are usually met with least resistance. The ability to install a filter that is "aimed" to accommodate filtering entire NZ's internet traffic can not be some random Joel Bloggs you pickup from a street corner.


I remember we happily supported users flooding their 128kbps connections in those days, but then Telecom changed the queuing so that games/voip experienced excessive jitter (best efforts service). It started getting less feasible after UBS rolled out with 256kbps, and was uneconomic for anymore than 256. Hope that international cable gets finished soon!




Qualified in business, certified in fibre, stuck in copper, have to keep going  ^_^

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  Reply # 409225 24-Nov-2010 22:43 Send private message

webwat:
alliao: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/technology/news/article.cfm?c_id=5&objectid=1792324

found this link, but it's getting really off topic...

http://stopthefilter.org.nz/content/what-you-can-do

I suppose that's all we can really do. Alternatively, we can always try the "follow the money" route, by finding out what companies are employed to install such service, because I do assume all that's involved are not stupid people, and profiting from tax payers are usually met with least resistance. The ability to install a filter that is "aimed" to accommodate filtering entire NZ's internet traffic can not be some random Joel Bloggs you pickup from a street corner.


I remember we happily supported users flooding their 128kbps connections in those days, but then Telecom changed the queuing so that games/voip experienced excessive jitter (best efforts service). It started getting less feasible after UBS rolled out with 256kbps, and was uneconomic for anymore than 256. Hope that international cable gets finished soon!


Webwat can you offer an opinion on why handover links from Telecom wholesale to the ISP's from UBA backhaul (and presumably the new EUBA services) are slow low (45kpbs per subscriber + forcast growth for 6 months, recalculated every 3 months)?

Is this pure artificial scarcity or are there legitimate technical reasons?

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  Reply # 409236 24-Nov-2010 23:38 Send private message

Ragnor:
webwat:
alliao: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/technology/news/article.cfm?c_id=5&objectid=1792324

found this link, but it's getting really off topic...

http://stopthefilter.org.nz/content/what-you-can-do

I suppose that's all we can really do. Alternatively, we can always try the "follow the money" route, by finding out what companies are employed to install such service, because I do assume all that's involved are not stupid people, and profiting from tax payers are usually met with least resistance. The ability to install a filter that is "aimed" to accommodate filtering entire NZ's internet traffic can not be some random Joel Bloggs you pickup from a street corner.


I remember we happily supported users flooding their 128kbps connections in those days, but then Telecom changed the queuing so that games/voip experienced excessive jitter (best efforts service). It started getting less feasible after UBS rolled out with 256kbps, and was uneconomic for anymore than 256. Hope that international cable gets finished soon!


Webwat can you offer an opinion on why handover links from Telecom wholesale to the ISP's from UBA backhaul (and presumably the new EUBA services) are slow low (45kpbs per subscriber + forcast growth for 6 months, recalculated every 3 months)?

Is this pure artificial scarcity or are there legitimate technical reasons?



I thought that de-prioritising of VoIP traffic was purely so that VoIP did not undercut their toll calling revenue, so more a knee jerk reaction by some top brass.

As for the per subscriber limits that does not apply to EUBA as far as I'm aware, or at least there are a number of real-time traffic CIRs which can be purchased per user. I'd like to know the reason for it on UBS/UBA though.

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  Reply # 409437 25-Nov-2010 13:04 Send private message

Yeah but aren't all the ISP's offering residential plans just using EUBA0 (no real time CIR for voip) as the other grades require modems that understand vlan tagging?

Here's the product profile on the wholesale site
http://www.telecomwholesale.co.nz/tw/wcm/connect/354c7c804460b8008e71ffd37d9c4fd6/25751_EUBA_3-0LC+product+profile.pdf?MOD=AJPERES&CACHEID=354c7c804460b8008e71ffd37d9c4fd6 

Page 1, still 32kbps CIR zzz
Page 2 diagram of EUBA components inc backhaul and handover (so presumably handover fibre into handover connection limitations are still applied?)

The main difference is it's all IP from the first data switch, no L2TP tunnels anymore.

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