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Watchmaker Wizard
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  Reply # 977527 30-Jan-2014 16:18 Send private message

Asus != Lenovo

http://shopap.lenovo.com/in/en/smartphones/




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  Reply # 977533 30-Jan-2014 16:23 Send private message

old3eyes:
KiwiNZ:
wasabi2k:
KiwiNZ: Lenovo have done OK with the IBM desktop/laptop division purchase, I really don't see why they would not do well with this.


Because they have no history in the mobile space - at all?


A Smartphone is a computer, I don't see an issue, Lenovo have the expertise 


Lenovo do produce smartphones called  Zenfone.  Fairly cheap  4 ~ 6 inch displays.

Zenfone


ASUS is not part of Lenovo




Mike

 Interesting. You're afraid of insects and women. Ladybugs must render you catatonic.

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  Reply # 977547 30-Jan-2014 16:51 Send private message

stevenz: Asus != Lenovo

http://shopap.lenovo.com/in/en/smartphones/


You're correct..  




Regards,

Old3eyes

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  Reply # 977943 31-Jan-2014 11:27 Send private message

billgates: That's a $7 billion hit/loss for Google. Motorola patents are not worth $7 billion.



Forbes reckons it's a fair bit lower than that:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/timworstall/2012/12/22/did-motorola-mobility-only-cost-google-1-5-billion/



We know what the headline number that Google paid for Motorola Mobilitywas: that’s $12.5 billion. But it’s possible for us to dig a little deeper and see what the real net cost is as well. And that net cost might have been as low as $1.5 billion, which is a pretty good price for the stash of patents that we all think they were really after. The first deduction we should make is to the set top business that they’ve justsold to Arris:
Google has sold Motorola Mobility’s set-top box business to Arris Group for $2.35bn in cash and stock, in a deal that will go through next year. The internet giant is offloading Motorola Home and getting a 15.7 per cent or so stake in broadband technology firm Arris plus $2.05bn in cash at the same time, Moto announced.
OK, so that’s some money back. But it’s most certainly not brought that purchase price down to $1.5 billion. The other thing we need to look at is the accumulated tax losses at Motorola Mobility. These were worth nothing to Motorola, because it wasn’t making profits to offset against such losses. But as we know, Google makes a fortune so any tax losses come straight off their own tax bill and are thus valuable to the company:
“The tax benefits of the deal make what was a good deal into a great deal,” said Robert Willens, a New York accounting and tax expert. He estimated that through the acquisition, Google can expect to reap $700m a year in tax deductions from future profits each year through 2019. Google also will be able to immediately reduce its taxes by $1bn due to Motorola Mobility’s US net operating loss, and by a further $700m due to its foreign operating loss, he said.
Tot those tax losses up, add the income from Arris, subtract from the original headline price and it does indeed look like Google only paid a net price of $1.5 billion for Motorola Mobility. Which is a pretty good deal when you come to calculate it all out.

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  Reply # 978038 31-Jan-2014 12:57 Send private message

Quite excited to see what comes out of this. As noted, Lenovo have a history of respect for the brands they acquire, as most obviously demonstrated by the never-ending Business Time appeal of ThinkPads. Some of their phones have caught my eye as well, in particular the K900, although the lack of LTE makes their range a no-go. Having tinkered with some of their excellent Android camera software, there's a lot of potential for combining their expertise with that of Moto's, and leveraging the two global distribution networks to get more phones on more shelves & in more hands. Thinking we'll see more Intel Inside, too, as both Lenovo & Moto have a history of pushing x86 in the phone space.

With Moto being free of the shackles of Googliness, I wouldn't be surprised to see an SD slot in their next flagship - and a welcome return to software augmentation (Stock Android is not to my tastes, I was much more interested in Moto's recent Droid handsets, but again, no useful LTE bands). As long as Moto keep the rapid updates & range of colour choices, this could be a welcome union from the hardware side. I'm sure Samsung, HTC & friends are glad to see Google rid themselves of that hardware division.




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  Reply # 978057 31-Jan-2014 13:15 Send private message

NikT: 
With Moto being free of the shackles of Googliness, I wouldn't be surprised to see an SD slot in their next flagship - and a welcome return to software augmentation (Stock Android is not to my tastes, I was much more interested in Moto's recent Droid handsets, but again, no useful LTE bands). As long as Moto keep the rapid updates & range of colour choices, this could be a welcome union from the hardware side. I'm sure Samsung, HTC & friends are glad to see Google rid themselves of that hardware division.


I too hope that the SD slot comes back but having been used to vanilla android over the past year I don't want to go back  bloatware that slows down the release of upgrades..




Regards,

Old3eyes

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  Reply # 978073 31-Jan-2014 13:37 2 people support this post Send private message

old3eyes:

I too hope that the SD slot comes back but having been used to vanilla android over the past year I don't want to go back  bloatware that slows down the release of upgrades..


I always find this argument kind of interesting, as Samsung in particular push out a whole stack of updates that add value & features over & above the core Google Android updates. I feel that a large amount of the negative sentiment in the market around Not Nexuses & update cycles is due to the US dominance of the popular tech press, where the operator certification process & level of control is significantly lengthier & more political than it is anywhere else in the world (With the exception of the some of the other entrenched, proprietary markets like Korea & Japan, where core Android updates are at least perceived as less important).

Sure - I could pick up a Nexus and receive updates directly from Google, but I'm just not very interested in vanilla Android or Nexus hardware. It's dull, it's middle of the road, it makes poor use of screen real-estate, it's not pushing innovative touchscreen computing in many of the areas I'm personally excited about - However, it's an excellent starting point from which to build something that does interest me in the software space, which Samsung do in many ways. HTC do this too, Motorola do some fun things on their Droid devices, and Sony and LG are getting there, plus the odd piece of UI or UX from Huawei/Lenovo/ZTE/whoever that catches my eye.. I would not like every Android device to run vanilla Android, as the marketplace would then look far too much like Windows Phone. Windows Phones are, with a few exceptions, much of a muchness.

Perhaps it's because I enjoy specialised hardware like the Galaxy Notes that vanilla Android actively removes value rather than adding it. Updates are fantastic, I'm always hanging out for the next one - Kitkat brings a lot of extremely welcome UI tweaks & subtle, pleasant animations - I just wouldn't sacrifice the kitchen sink full of surprisingly useful OEM features for the sake of faster updates to the underlying OS, personally. Both HTC & Samsung are proving that it's possible to have the feature-cake & reasonably timed updates as well. I hope Motorola will do the same under Lenovo.

JMO & all that. :)




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  Reply # 978114 31-Jan-2014 14:29 Send private message

I agree ^

I also don't understand the urge to update





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  Reply # 981083 6-Feb-2014 06:23 One person supports this post Send private message

sidefx:
billgates: That's a $7 billion hit/loss for Google. Motorola patents are not worth $7 billion.



Forbes reckons it's a fair bit lower than that:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/timworstall/2012/12/22/did-motorola-mobility-only-cost-google-1-5-billion/



We know what the headline number that Google paid for Motorola Mobilitywas: that’s $12.5 billion. But it’s possible for us to dig a little deeper and see what the real net cost is as well. And that net cost might have been as low as $1.5 billion, which is a pretty good price for the stash of patents that we all think they were really after. The first deduction we should make is to the set top business that they’ve justsold to Arris:
Google has sold Motorola Mobility’s set-top box business to Arris Group for $2.35bn in cash and stock, in a deal that will go through next year. The internet giant is offloading Motorola Home and getting a 15.7 per cent or so stake in broadband technology firm Arris plus $2.05bn in cash at the same time, Moto announced.
OK, so that’s some money back. But it’s most certainly not brought that purchase price down to $1.5 billion. The other thing we need to look at is the accumulated tax losses at Motorola Mobility. These were worth nothing to Motorola, because it wasn’t making profits to offset against such losses. But as we know, Google makes a fortune so any tax losses come straight off their own tax bill and are thus valuable to the company:
“The tax benefits of the deal make what was a good deal into a great deal,” said Robert Willens, a New York accounting and tax expert. He estimated that through the acquisition, Google can expect to reap $700m a year in tax deductions from future profits each year through 2019. Google also will be able to immediately reduce its taxes by $1bn due to Motorola Mobility’s US net operating loss, and by a further $700m due to its foreign operating loss, he said.
Tot those tax losses up, add the income from Arris, subtract from the original headline price and it does indeed look like Google only paid a net price of $1.5 billion for Motorola Mobility. Which is a pretty good deal when you come to calculate it all out.


That is almost correct and it is a much truer picture than you will find in the business news of most daily papers or websites.

What is still missing from the calculations is the nice little cash pile that Motorola Mobility had when they were purchased by Google.

That was three billion US dollars.

Add that to the calculations and you can see that Google made a decent profit on the whole adventure and got the patents as well.

The patents were not the only thing that Google retained though. Motorola Mobility's advanced technology group stays with Google and will now be fully integrated with Google rather than being part of what had been an arm's length subsidiary.

Funny really how the truth is so far from what is being reported in most news media.

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