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Hard and Fast


The secret life of mobile batteries - UPDATED 6.10.2016

By Antonios Karantze, in , posted: 20-Sep-2016 19:29

Smartphone batteries have been in the news recently, in case you haven't been keeping up. On this mornings Jetstar flight the attendant took extra care to call out that Galaxy Note7 users would have to keep their device off - personally if I had one of these mobiles I would be utterly livid. Just not acceptable in 2016.

Hard choices

I've used iPhones in my line of work for the last few years as my primary device, and androids only as secondary units. The battery life on Apple phones is enough to drive you to despair at times, and as these things get bigger and pack more in, I can't the situation improving much.

I'm not a fan of the bigger screen devices like the 6 and 7 - I think Apple hit the mark perfectly with the iPhone 5 screen size - but you have to use what is reasonably available, and for me that is an iPhone 6.

Over the last year or so, the battery life on this device has become steadily more atrocious, but when I asked ServicePlus to have a look (Apple's agent in NZ), the diagnostics were that things were.... ok.... but perhaps remove the facebook app, which is a notorious hog. I did but that didn't really help..... and my experience continued to reflect that my battery must be munted.

In the weekend I read an article in Forbes, and the author opined that users should skip the iPhone 7 and just replace the battery in their existing iPhones, waiting for 2018 when the iPhone 8 is released (2017 will bring the iPhone 7S). Forbes article

The application Battery Life was mentioned... so I downloaded it and what an interesting app to use. Even though IOS9/10 locked out many of the statistics about the battery that could be read, some elements are still discoverable. Here's what says about my phone tonight:

A munted model

When new, the phone had a battery capacity of 1750Mah. All rechargeable batteries degrade over time, but what is interesting is where mine is at - maximum capacity is now 1100Mah, 37% less than as new.

Of course, the iPhone battery meter tells me how much charge is remaining - OF THE DECREASED CAPACITY - meaning the more I use this phone, the faster it appears my battery is draining, when in fact it has degraded seriously to the point of being nearly unusable. 

I double checked these readings using a Mac app called CoconutBattery, and it's reports are consistent with the above display. The battery has lost a lot of capacity.

So, tricky. 

Technically the iPhone battery reading is correct - 396/1100 = 36% charge. But without an app on the iPhone telling me "your battery is screwed bro", I am left wondering. I don't think it should have degraded this rapidly - I used my other devices which are older, and they havent got anywhere near this level of degradation, some of them are 6 years old and constantly being used. I don't know if it's better to be told I only have 396/1750, given I can never recharge the battery back up to 1750.... but it would have been nice to know.

The device is 2 years old. Arguing over reasonable life of a battery under CGA feels quite the uphill battle. I do wish Apple did make better tools available that acknowledge the limits of technology and help better manage - although if they did, I expect they would a truckload coming back at the 12 month mark as 'not fit'.

Battery Life. CoconutBattery.

You wouldn't think batteries are that interesting.... but it's amazing what you can discover.

 

UPDATE: 6.10.16

Serviceplus replaced the battery for me under warranty, as a precaution against imminent fail. Great outcome in the end, and excellent service from the wonderful Hilary!



What do you do if you're in the CBD in an Earthquake?

By Antonios Karantze, in , posted: 22-Jul-2013 17:06

Like many people today I have been watching the numerous videos on the various news websites - and so far the site for NZ Herald seems to have better quality content than Stuff in general - and it occurs to me there is a real absence of useful information about what to do if an Earthquake hits while you are in the streets of a CBD.

In many ways Wellington was lucky with this event - and I'm confident it's not over - and one of those was that it was a sunday evening (5.09pm to be precise) and most people were at home. I was cooking dinner in the kitchen.

Of course, 5.09pm on a weekday would have been quite a different story - the streets would be full of people either scurrying to the railway station for a train or bus home, if not waiting on Lambton Quay for a bus.

In this event - and if you rewatch footage of the Christchurch events - building facades broke off and windows shattered and fell. A friend of mine was caught on TV video jogging through CHCH just as a facade collapsed and barely missed him (thinking of you Dave....)

The Governments 'Get Through' website - Get Through - contains really good, genuine information on preparation and what to do but is really heavy on the presumption you will be at home when something big happens (as it did on Sunday). But there is next to nothing on what to do if you happen to be in a metro area surrounded by tall buildings, except for the line 'drop/cover/hold' with pictures indicating you get under a table.

I walk to work frequently, which is one of the major benefits of Wellington, but occasionally do have to drive in and park because of weather or sheer time boundaries in the morning or evening. It's just the way it is. 

I also frequently walk along The Terrace, Bolton Street, Aurora Terrace, Lambton Quay and the 'Golden Mile' up to Manners Street. All area's which will turn into one epic zone of death from debris and glass in the event of a really strong shake. 

What exactly, is the suggested plan for people to do, if they happen to be caught out on the street? There is a distinct absence of handy tables on the street for one to duck under, and no real ideas I can find from an hour of googling on what to do. It's just so unexpected.

The state described above is a uniquely Wellington problem with description to match. But Christchurch is being rebuilt with a new CBD and a permanent membership to the Earthquake club... and we all know New Zealand is on a number of active tectonic plates (meaning nowhere is free of earthquake risk - I'm looking at you Auckland)... given so many people work in the city and around so much risk potential, surely there must be good guidance on how to protect yourself, somewhere.

People do need to know this, more than ever now as so many of us are acutely tuned to what just happened.

Drop Cover Hold sounds great on a website and is really, really unhelpful if you happen to be in the street. 

I expect the suggestions will be just as unsatisfying and very much along the lines of 'well.... there's not that much...', but my daughters sprang into action at home on Sunday as they had been trained. My youngest suggested I become a turtle in the middle of the street - and looking at The Terrace that filled me with utter dread.

This is not a complaint. It is a call for more information... because I'm certainly blinkin listening...! 



Org charts… Silicon Valley style

By Antonios Karantze, in , posted: 30-Jun-2011 20:01

I would argue that this doesn't just equate to Silicon Valley. Who's willing to play "plug in NZ companies into the chart below"?

org-chart



Innovation

By Antonios Karantze, in , posted: 6-Jun-2011 08:03

Original weblink: PWC on Innovation

A friend of mine reposted this article on his LinkedIn profile, which is on Innovation, and is something I found quite interesting. I'm posting it here, because it holds very true for the ICT industry in New Zealand, especially now that the UFB project is about to get going (more on my views in a coming post).

The main points:

"Demystifying Innovation: take down the barriers to new growth," the drive for innovation must arise from the CEO and other executive leadership by creating a culture that is open to new ideas and systematic in its approach to their development. The innovation process generally has four phases:

  • Discovery: Identifying and sourcing ideas and problems that are the basis for future innovation. Sources may include employees as well as customers, suppliers, partners and other external organisations.
  • Incubation: Refining, developing and testing good ideas to see if they are technically feasible and make business sense.
  • Acceleration: Establishing pilot programs to test commercial feasibility.
  • Scale: Integrating the innovation into the company; commercialisation and mass marketing.

The study also identifies seven misconceptions about the innovation process:

  • Innovation can be delegated. Not so. The drive to innovate begins at the top. If the CEO doesn't protect and reward the process, it will fail.
  • Middle Management is the ally of innovation. Managers are not natural champions of innovation. They to reject new ideas in favor of efficiency.
  • Innovative people work for the money. Establishing a culture that embeds innovation in the organisation will attract and retain creative talent.
  • Innovation is a lucky accident. Successful innovation most often results from a disciplined process that sorts through many ideas.
  • The more open the innovation process, the less disciplined. Advances in collaborative tools, like social networking, are accelerating open innovation.
  • Businesses know how much innovation they need. Leaders must calculate their potential for inorganic growth to determine their need to innovate.
  • Innovation can't be measured. Leadership needs to identify its ROII--Return on Innovation Investment.

ICT is a capital intensive business; that means LOTS of cash spent by companies is classified a certain way and can be depreciated over future years, much like any other asset can be. If I spend $1m developing a new product, it means I can take a charge to the business accounts over the life of the product, rather than realise all costs up front. This might sound boring and a little dry, but it's a fundamental tenet of how investment works and the behaviour it drives in a company. Put another way, if you spend $1m buying a business, you expect returns over the life of the investment, like any other investment. The more the better.

The interesting conundrum though is the last point; Innovation can't be measured. At least, not with significant accuracy in advance of the investment. Any investment carries risk, which can only be reduced by understanding more about the nature of the investment as well as the people making the promise.

The significance of the last point is that Innovation involves Research & Development - words that drive cold sweat into investment folk. Simple statements like 'Online Ordering', 'It all just works', 'It shouldn't be this hard' - well, Simple is difficult to engineer and takes a lot of effort. Folks have marvelled at how easy the Apple iPhone is to use - but prior to this, the industry threw GOBS of Innovation money at the concept. Apple did it better - and I bet they went down a lot of dead ends and wasted efforts in the process.

That's a hard business case to write - 'The estimate is $4m, but about 15-30% of the project involves stuff we've never done before'.

UFB has been pitched as $1.35bn public money investment, matched by at least equal private sector investment. The industry has thrown out estimates of $3-6bn of their investment over that time. Personally I believe it will be even more than this - but that is not a bad thing.

Innovation doesn't occur just in technology - it can and should happen with distribution, delivery, user experience, billing and so on.

But each change requires commitment and reason, and an element of risk. Some changes don't deliver new revenue - but they improve how a service is used and what customers experience.

One of the best I have seen is with 2degress, on their Pay Monthly plans:

I can set a billing threshold for my account, so I don't get billshock. For example, $250. At 80%, or $200, I get a warning text. At $250 my account gets suspended until I unlock it. It's a simple set and forget procedure, avoids opportunity to blow my bill (a BIG problem with Pay Later services), and gives me huge confidence to use it.

Where the innovation is required: unlocking it. I have to go online, or make a call to the call centre.

Why can't I just send a text back to a service number to say 'thanks for saving me, please unlock my account now'?

Permalink to Innovation | Main Index


BP Spills Coffee

By Antonios Karantze, in , posted: 28-Jun-2010 20:53

Ex Stuff website, but STILL very funny




And streams _very_ well at HD on my cable connection at home...






antoniosk's profile

Antonios Karantze
Wellington
New Zealand


 

Antonios has been actively employed in the IT & Technology sector since 1991, and has worked on many commercials projects and products in New Zealand, Australia and the United Kingdom. Working in product or actively managing programmes of work, he has always focused on building for the end customer, and not just promoting new technologies. Industry experience includes all telecommunications areas for business and private customers, private insurance, loyalty, media, energy and gambling. 

Since 2013, he has been involved with the development and launch of many popular smartphone applications in New Zealand, including

- TAB Mobile
- AMI & State Insurance digital experience
- Fly Buys
- Newshub for web and app
- Genesis Energy & Energy Online
- MyACC for Business

Genuinely passionate about technologies, internet and computing in general, he lives in the city he was born in - Wellington, New Zealand, the creative heart of hub of digital sector for the country.