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eph

176 posts

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  # 2025094 29-May-2018 19:53
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Fred99:

 

eph:

 

This reminds me of the radon hysteria in Europe - but at least the meth tests are not compulsory yet (might come to that as well)...

 

 

Radon actually can be a real threat. (In some parts of Europe it appears that ground-floor readings are well in excess of WHO guidelines).  I'm not sure if there was perhaps hysteria in places where levels were typically low.

 

 

Well, meth can be a real threat as well especially in former meth lab houses.  You still have to have a radon test before building any new house in Europe.

 

 

If you read the above press release, the chance of meth tests (and huge cost of subsequent decontamination) being compulsory should be close to zero - unless the tenants were running a meth lab.

 

 

That's a good news. Though you can only identify meth labs which were found out...




8461 posts

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  # 2025166 29-May-2018 20:50
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eph:

 

Well, meth can be a real threat as well especially in former meth lab houses.  You still have to have a radon test before building any new house in Europe.

 

 

There are several places in Europe where radon measures >2000 Bq/M3 are recorded, quite large areas where ~500 is measured.  I think it's wise that radon tests are required - at least in certain areas.

 

Anyway if the LNT model holds, then it's a pretty reasonable assumption that even in NZ there's much more harm even from (the typically low) radon exposure than "3rd hand" meth exposure - for which it appears there's no evidence at all of harm - at least from people smoking meth indoors if not (probably) from cooking meth.


 
 
 
 


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  # 2025191 29-May-2018 21:43
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If all the meth cleaners turn to mould cleaners the world will be a better place. Anyone tried to smoke mould?

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  # 2025790 30-May-2018 17:07
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1eStar: If all the meth cleaners turn to mould cleaners the world will be a better place. Anyone tried to smoke mould?

 

Gave me gas. And a bad headache





My thoughts are no longer my own and is probably representative of our media-controlled government


UHD

656 posts

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  # 2025816 30-May-2018 17:56
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kryptonjohn:

 

Jeez, in my ignorance I though the only safety issue with meth houses was where it was used as a lab. Seems obvious to me that having someone smoke in the place was hardly going to turn it toxic death trap. 

 

 

 

 

This has always been the case. The issue is knowing whether a house has been used as a lab or just smoked in. There is no easy (read: cost effective) way to tell. Meth contamination levels were used as a baseline or general purpose test overseas as a goal to reach in order to ensure the other dangerous precursor chemicals used in methamphetamine manufacture had also been cleaned since testing for each of these chemicals individually is rather expensive and time consuming.

 

There is still no way to tell if a house has been used as a lab or just smoked in without physical evidence or expensive, time consuming testing so the 1.5µg/100cm2 baseline test will now be adjusted to 15µg/100cm2(?) and the hope is that houses with levels approaching that haven't been used as a lab or that the dangerous precursors have been cleaned sufficiently so that kids are safe.

 

Time will tell, but I get the feeling that Labour assume the risk is worth it as a quick solution to the housing crisis they have suddenly discovered is a lot harder to solve than they originally thought.


neb

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  # 2025825 30-May-2018 18:19
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Fred99:

eph:

 

This reminds me of the radon hysteria in Europe - but at least the meth tests are not compulsory yet (might come to that as well)...

 

 

Radon actually can be a real threat. (In some parts of Europe it appears that ground-floor readings are well in excess of WHO guidelines).  I'm not sure if there was perhaps hysteria in places where levels were typically low.

 

 

Radon has a long history in Europe of being problematic for miners, where it was known as Bergsucht, "mountain illness". Once people figured out what the problem was, it led to a general paranoia about radon, mostly ignoring the fact that breathing very high concentrations in mines for 8, 10, 12 hours at a time for years at a stretch was quite different from occasional exposure to low concentrations in your basement. So it's not a no-risk threat, but it has been overblown in many instances.

neb

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  # 2025827 30-May-2018 18:22
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MikeAqua:

The testing industry was very opportunist in relation to meth testing.

 

 

Same with "asbestos" removal. "We couldn't find any traces of asbestos in your textured ceiling, but that doesn't rule out the fact that there could be asbestos in there. Would you like us to remove it just in case? Options: [Yes] / [Yes] (Default: Yes)".

 
 
 
 


neb

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  # 2025828 30-May-2018 18:24
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Fred99:

There are several places in Europe where radon measures >2000 Bq/M3 are recorded, quite large areas where ~500 is measured.  I think it's wise that radon tests are required - at least in certain areas.

 

 

It also makes it impossible to do any work with radiation there since you've exceeded the safety limits before you've even started doing anything.

neb

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  # 2025829 30-May-2018 18:26
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1eStar: If all the meth cleaners turn to mould cleaners the world will be a better place. Anyone tried to smoke mould?

 

 

You could hit the mould with radon and kill it that way.

 

 

Although admittedly a Co60 gamma source would be more reliable.



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  # 2025863 30-May-2018 19:32
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neb:
Fred99:

 

There are several places in Europe where radon measures >2000 Bq/M3 are recorded, quite large areas where ~500 is measured.  I think it's wise that radon tests are required - at least in certain areas.

 

It also makes it impossible to do any work with radiation there since you've exceeded the safety limits before you've even started doing anything.

 

No it isn't.  Ventilate to reduce level to <400 Bq/M3, monitor and do whatever's needed for mitigation.




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  # 2025867 30-May-2018 19:35
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neb:
Fred99:

 

eph:

 

This reminds me of the radon hysteria in Europe - but at least the meth tests are not compulsory yet (might come to that as well)...

 

 

Radon actually can be a real threat. (In some parts of Europe it appears that ground-floor readings are well in excess of WHO guidelines).  I'm not sure if there was perhaps hysteria in places where levels were typically low.

 

Radon has a long history in Europe of being problematic for miners, where it was known as Bergsucht, "mountain illness". Once people figured out what the problem was, it led to a general paranoia about radon, mostly ignoring the fact that breathing very high concentrations in mines for 8, 10, 12 hours at a time for years at a stretch was quite different from occasional exposure to low concentrations in your basement. So it's not a no-risk threat, but it has been overblown in many instances.

 

It's not just in basements - it seeps into ground floor dwelling spaces.  Most people are at home for more hours than they spend at work.


neb

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  # 2025870 30-May-2018 19:40
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Fred99:

neb:
Fred99:

 

There are several places in Europe where radon measures >2000 Bq/M3 are recorded, quite large areas where ~500 is measured.  I think it's wise that radon tests are required - at least in certain areas.

 

It also makes it impossible to do any work with radiation there since you've exceeded the safety limits before you've even started doing anything.

 

No it isn't.  Ventilate to reduce level to <400 Bq/M3, monitor and do whatever's needed for mitigation.

 

 

If the ground you're building on is legally classed as low-level radioactive waste, there's not much you can do in terms of mitigation...

neb

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  # 2025871 30-May-2018 19:41
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SepticSceptic:

Gave me gas. And a bad headache

 

 

Yeah, I've had curry like that too.



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  # 2025874 30-May-2018 19:43
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1eStar: If all the meth cleaners turn to mould cleaners the world will be a better place. Anyone tried to smoke mould?

 

Close possibly.  Lots of fungi could be candidates I guess, but probably more usual to make tea with it rather than smoke it.

 

Mould tea would probably be like "kombucha".




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  # 2025878 30-May-2018 19:47
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neb:
Fred99:

 

neb:
Fred99:

 

There are several places in Europe where radon measures >2000 Bq/M3 are recorded, quite large areas where ~500 is measured.  I think it's wise that radon tests are required - at least in certain areas.

 

It also makes it impossible to do any work with radiation there since you've exceeded the safety limits before you've even started doing anything.

 

No it isn't.  Ventilate to reduce level to <400 Bq/M3, monitor and do whatever's needed for mitigation.

 

If the ground you're building on is legally classed as low-level radioactive waste, there's not much you can do in terms of mitigation...

 

What?

 

Radon isn't low-level radioactive waste.  Radon mitigation - usually by forced ventilation if needed - is pretty normal, quite widely used in parts of the US.


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