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184 posts

Master Geek
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# 237944 26-Jun-2018 09:49
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Hi all, In my garden I have a bank that is overgrown with weeds at the moment. I want to plant something that will support the bank and win against the weeds. Preferably native. Non coastal, earthy ground, Wellington. Any help or pointers to who I can go to to get some tips would be greatly appreciated. (Oh and I did try Google but really confusing stuff I get back). Thanks! Oliver


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Uber Geek
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  # 2043959 26-Jun-2018 10:13
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If the spot isn't dry Renga Renga is a cheap way of doing it. A few plants will soon produce enough seed to cover a greater area. I have a 12m strip planted with a row of them that produces over 1l of seed each year. You could even get cheeky and deadhead some of the public plantings.

 
 
 
 


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  # 2045737 28-Jun-2018 19:01
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I have a similar slope and have planted some muehlenbeckia complexa. Hasn’t worked as well as I had hoped, but would eventually keep the weeds down if I planted a few more to fill the gaps.

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  # 2045847 29-Jun-2018 08:04
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I am about to go through a similar exercise and figured I would take a photo of the location (indicating the amount of shading, soil quality etc) and take it along to a native plant nursery (there are a couple here in Auckland - but not sure where you are based) and ask them for their advice. 


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  # 2045901 29-Jun-2018 09:48
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Bung: If the spot isn't dry Renga Renga is a cheap way of doing it. A few plants will soon produce enough seed to cover a greater area. I have a 12m strip planted with a row of them that produces over 1l of seed each year. You could even get cheeky and deadhead some of the public plantings.

 

Plus renga renga have dwarf varieties. The normal size is a lot like agapanthas which many people use for the same purpose. But renga renga are far less invasive and easier to pull out if you ever need to.




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  # 2045935 29-Jun-2018 10:29
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Hi,

 

 

Thanks all for those answers. Will digest all that and come up with something.

 

 

I am based in south Wellington. about 500m from coast 150m up. So not as salty or sandy. Bank is relatively steep with loose earth, no sand. some Exposure to southerly, shady but light, and gets lots of rain (Welly afterall ;-)

 

 

Cheer sOliver

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  # 2046014 29-Jun-2018 13:00
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olivernz: I am based in south Wellington. about 500m from coast 150m up. So not as salty or sandy. Bank is relatively steep with loose earth, no sand. some Exposure to southerly, shady but light, and gets lots of rain (Welly afterall ;-)

 

Rengarenga is a good coastal plant and tolerates coastal winds. It is called the rock lily and "occurs naturally north of Greymouth and Kaikoura near the sea and, as the name suggests, usually on rocks." Prefers filtered light or shade so fine on the south facing bank or as groundcover under trees. Plants are essentially round and 1m in each dimension so you probably won't need the dwarf variety which looks great in pots.

 

Ours is thriving in the Hutt Valley with no care or feeding, a lot of morning sun, frosts, and a lot of water due to overflow from our spouting during torrential rain.

 

 

 

Edited: add wind tolerance


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