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# 250790 25-May-2019 15:32
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I recently had an operation in one eye for cataracts. Both eyes have them equally, but of course only one at a time gets treated. 

 

Before the surgery, one of the more pronounced effects was vivid rainbow halos around bright light sources. This was really striking, especially apparent when looking at a full moon. It was exactly the same with both eyes. I know because I tested them many times over a long period. Closing either eye made no difference. The effect was the same.

 

After the operation I did the test again. As expected, the halo had disappeared with the operated eye. What was not expected, is that there is no longer any trace of it with either eye! I have tested this repeatedly. Not a glimmer of rainbow effect regardless of the eye.

 

The focus is what it should be, much sharper in the operated eye, still blurry in the other one, but no rainbow colours to be seen. How can this be? I assume it was the result of refraction in the cloudy lenses, but why should it also have vanished in the eye that hasn't been operated? Is this some trick of the brain? Can anyone enlighten me? I am intrigued.

 

 

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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  # 2245469 25-May-2019 18:51
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I suspect ye olde biological central CPU unit that sits in ones head is smart enough to select which eye it needs to use for vision.




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Underlying overtones
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  # 2245757 26-May-2019 07:22
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It’s the well-known phenomenon - OPRR - optical parasympathetic rainbow rejection.

 
 
 
 


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  # 2245853 26-May-2019 14:17
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Odd. Did you ask your surgeon?

 

 

 

I get what are referred to as 'visual migraines' sometimes: curious geometric black and white patterns that march around like an old TV picture in the margins of your vision. They look like (at least, mine do) black and white zigzags.








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  # 2245860 26-May-2019 15:09
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Funny. I have had those as well, though not for awhile. Scared the hell out of me the first time it happened. I will mention the missing rainbow when I see my surgeon tomorrow for the two-week checkup.

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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  # 2254728 9-Jun-2019 10:56
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More intriguing than that, if you didn't have an artificial lens installed - as it used to be ages ago - you'd have been able to see ultraviolet.

 

 

 

https://petapixel.com/2012/04/17/the-human-eye-can-see-in-ultraviolet-when-the-lens-is-removed/


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  # 2254747 9-Jun-2019 11:20
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@Rikkitic Can you see this alright? 😀

 

 

 

 

 




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  # 2254755 9-Jun-2019 11:39
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That's quite a rainbow flag. I did mention it to my eye surgeon but he wasn't really interested. I would love to be able to see ultraviolet like the bees do, but I wouldn't want to have to wear coke bottle glasses for everything else.

 

 





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  # 2254782 9-Jun-2019 12:32
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Rikkitic:

 

I recently had an operation in one eye for cataracts. Both eyes have them equally, but of course only one at a time gets treated. 

 

 

Eh funny you say that, there are some eye surgeons who do both at the same time, to save on hospital costs. Presumably private hospital.





Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


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  # 2254783 9-Jun-2019 12:33
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Rikkitic:

 

What was not expected, is that there is no longer any trace of it with either eye! I have tested this repeatedly. Not a glimmer of rainbow effect regardless of the eye.

 

The focus is what it should be, much sharper in the operated eye, still blurry in the other one, but no rainbow colours to be seen. How can this be? I assume it was the result of refraction in the cloudy lenses, but why should it also have vanished in the eye that hasn't been operated? Is this some trick of the brain? Can anyone enlighten me? I am intrigued.

 

 

Are you sure the eye is seeing anything at all





Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


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  # 2254953 9-Jun-2019 20:34
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pctek:

 

More intriguing than that, if you didn't have an artificial lens installed - as it used to be ages ago - you'd have been able to see ultraviolet.

 

 

 

https://petapixel.com/2012/04/17/the-human-eye-can-see-in-ultraviolet-when-the-lens-is-removed/

 

 

Wow - that's bizarre.

 

I have a friend with congenital aphakia (no lenses) - as described in the wiki article.

 

His eyesight is pretty awful - there's some reason - he's told me why but I've forgotten - they can't implant an artificial lens.

 

I'm red-green colourblind, I'm told that artists with red-green colourblindness often paint with unusual colours.  Problem is that to people who are similarly red-green colourblind  - like me - the paintings look completely normal.


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