Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




892 posts

Ultimate Geek

Lifetime subscriber

#268318 12-Mar-2020 12:46
Send private message

Seen as we have had a lull in domestic Covid-19 cases, I thought it would be interesting to see what people have been doing to plan / prepare / act for Covid-19.

 

Obvious high uncertainty about how the situation will end up for NZ.

 

In my eye's the situation in NZ could end up anywhere from basically the status quo (economic slowdown focused on some sectors like hospitality, supply shortages for things like light-switches, vacuum cleaners, paracetamol), to the situation in Wuhan & Italy (hospitals badly overloaded, people locked down to their houses).

Most likely outcome will be somewhere in the middle, bit it is anybodies guess. Potentially large gatherings will be banned, perhaps including schools and daycares closed, and perhaps a work from home if you can instruction given.

I like to plan for the worst, even if the odds of that case are low.

 

I would like to note that even in the worst case situation (based on wuhan and Italy), the following is likely:

 

  • Food supply chains will remain up (In wuhan intially one person from each household was permitted to leave the house to get supplies once a week. This was then tightened to supplies being delivered by social workers. I think only the first situation is feasible in NZ) - Should note that NZ is likely to be one of the best locations in the world to be in if there is a food supply crunch.
  • Fuel supply chain is likely to remain up. (world is awash with oil due to reduced demand coupled with squabbling withing the oil cartel...)
  • Utilities such as power, water and sewage will remain up.
  • People working in critical industries will be needed to work if well.
  • Healthcare industry is likely to get slammed.

As such stockpiling many months worth of food and toilet paper is not very rational - and actually can crush supply chains.

That said if you do want to stockpile, do it early as it gives supply chains more time to respond.

 

I have what I think it two weeks worth of supplies on hand, which I feel is prudent, given we are reasonably young and don't have chronic illnesses. It is kinda nice that when the supermarket runs out of cheap hand soap or tissues, we have enough on hand that we don't need to buy the expensive stuff.

Note that the USA CDC has advised people over 60 or who have chronic illnesses like diabetes to stock up on goods and buckle down for a lengthy stay at home. The situation in the USA is quite a bit worse than here, so no need to follow that advise, but consider that similar advice may be issued for NZ. Again if you want to stock up, please do so early.

 

I think it is best to focus on zero cost and low cost thing you can do to be ready. Money on hand is good to have in an economic downturn


In terms of what I have done to get ready

 

  • I am not currently working, so the potential closure of school's & daycare's won't impact me.
  • My Wife is fully geared up for working from home (and does a few days a week). That said, we own the business, and due to upstream.
  • Have 2 weeks supplies on hand, with a bit extra of the things that are both important and may become hard to find - hand soap, dish & clothes washer powder, disinfectant, baby supplies
  • Have expanded our first aid kit, to mean we can handle a bit more stuff at home.
  • Not booked any overseas travel
  • Sold some shares to increase our emergency fund, incase we need to inject money into the business to keep staff.
  • Started being more frugal - linked with above.
  • Started mild social distancing - Minimising public transport use, choosing outdoor child activities over indoor ones etc.

Keen to hear what other's are doing.

As a closing remark - Please be rational. I don't consider buying comically large amounts of toilet paper to be rational.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2 | 3
2418 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #2436777 12-Mar-2020 12:58
Send private message

I have enough food for about 3 weeks, real food that I like to eat not just cans of crap in an emergency kit. I can fully work from home and so can my wife. I've been ready since very early on as I had a feeling this might go bad.





Delete Social Media

 


My thoughts are my own and are in no way representative of my employer.


1945 posts

Uber Geek


  #2436789 12-Mar-2020 13:16
Send private message

More worried about running out of medication than anything else. I can live off corn fritters and bulk frozen chicken if I need to in the event of a quarantine. 

 

We're not talking months of disruption like a major civil defense event (e.g. volcanic eruption) but I'm working backwards from not having any groceries at all for that time frame and seeing what I need to survive from that. No more, no less. 

 

Working on the work angle. I am able to do my job from home if I have access to our systems but other parts of our business (e.g. sales/shop floors) won't.

 

So not immediately worried about the potential for quarantine but more concerned about how sudden it could be. 


 
 
 
 


4647 posts

Uber Geek


  #2436792 12-Mar-2020 13:20
Send private message

Scott3:

 

Potentially large gatherings will be banned, perhaps including schools and daycares closed, and perhaps a work from home if you can instruction given.

 

 

Why would you close schools? Youth don't appear to be at risk. 

 

However, close down the school and medical professionals need to take time off work to look after their school-less children. 




892 posts

Ultimate Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #2436796 12-Mar-2020 13:28
Send private message

surfisup1000:

 

Why would you close schools? Youth don't appear to be at risk. 

 

However, close down the school and medical professionals need to take time off work to look after their school-less children. 

 

 

In short, contagion.

While the survival rate of school aged children for COVID-19 appears to exceed 99.8%, they are quite capable of catching it and spreading it.

 

Kids going to school (particually at the big city high schools) is like holding 2000 people conferences with high levels of interpersonal mingling. They could then all carry COVID-19 home without symptoms and their infect parents & grandparents.




892 posts

Ultimate Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #2436805 12-Mar-2020 13:42
Send private message

GV27:

 

More worried about running out of medication than anything else. I can live off corn fritters and bulk frozen chicken if I need to in the event of a quarantine. 

 

We're not talking months of disruption like a major civil defense event (e.g. volcanic eruption) but I'm working backwards from not having any groceries at all for that time frame and seeing what I need to survive from that. No more, no less. 

 

Working on the work angle. I am able to do my job from home if I have access to our systems but other parts of our business (e.g. sales/shop floors) won't.

 

So not immediately worried about the potential for quarantine but more concerned about how sudden it could be. 

 

 

Potentially we are. Wuhan was locked down on the 23rd Jan, and is still locked down today.

It is not really clear how we unwind any lock down's... hopefully it dosn't mean waiting a year+ for a vaccine.

That said, critical industry like food supply will go on, so there is little need to stockpile food.

 

 

 

Regarding being sudden - Italy has shocked the worked by going from kinda normal to hundreds of deaths a day in under two weeks...


4647 posts

Uber Geek


  #2436814 12-Mar-2020 13:49
Send private message

Scott3:

 

surfisup1000:

 

Why would you close schools? Youth don't appear to be at risk. 

 

However, close down the school and medical professionals need to take time off work to look after their school-less children. 

 

 

In short, contagion.

While the survival rate of school aged children for COVID-19 appears to exceed 99.8%, they are quite capable of catching it and spreading it.

 

Kids going to school (particually at the big city high schools) is like holding 2000 people conferences with high levels of interpersonal mingling. They could then all carry COVID-19 home without symptoms and their infect parents & grandparents.

 

 

Are you sure?  I think we need to study the science.

 

https://www.businessinsider.com.au/coronavirus-case-children-infants-low-disease-expert-explain-why-2020-2?r=US&IR=T

 

It appears very few kids get infected. And, those that do have a very high recovery rate. 

 

Early days yet though, but, I think we should gather more data before they close schools. 

 

 


16195 posts

Uber Geek


  #2436816 12-Mar-2020 13:52
Send private message

Scott3:

 

surfisup1000:

 

Why would you close schools? Youth don't appear to be at risk. 

 

However, close down the school and medical professionals need to take time off work to look after their school-less children. 

 

 

In short, contagion.

While the survival rate of school aged children for COVID-19 appears to exceed 99.8%, they are quite capable of catching it and spreading it.

 

Kids going to school (particually at the big city high schools) is like holding 2000 people conferences with high levels of interpersonal mingling. They could then all carry COVID-19 home without symptoms and their infect parents & grandparents.

 

 

 

 

Yes, children are perfect spreaders of this. Their hygiene practices are  also often not up to the level of an adult either, especially young children who don't know any better. I remember as a kid I had a germ phobia after watching an educational film about viruses and how they spread. 


 
 
 
 


Mad Scientist
22212 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #2436817 12-Mar-2020 13:54
Send private message

surfisup1000:

 

Are you sure?  I think we need to study the science.

 

https://www.businessinsider.com.au/coronavirus-case-children-infants-low-disease-expert-explain-why-2020-2?r=US&IR=T

 

It appears very few kids get infected. And, those that do have a very high recovery rate. 

 

Early days yet though, but, I think we should gather more data before they close schools. 

 

 

this is what i don't understand about how people think.

 

the question you have to ask - is low risk is good enough.

 

low risk is not good enough.

 

no risk is better. shutting down school means no risk of transmission in the school.





Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


1945 posts

Uber Geek


  #2436819 12-Mar-2020 13:55
Send private message

Scott3:

 

That said, critical industry like food supply will go on, so there is little need to stockpile food.

 

 

Apologies, I was more focusing on the quarantine time as opposed to a total lock-down. 

 

My local KFC does delivery. I feel like this is an important thing to note as well. 




892 posts

Ultimate Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #2436823 12-Mar-2020 14:03
Send private message

GV27:

 

Scott3:

 

That said, critical industry like food supply will go on, so there is little need to stockpile food.

 

 

Apologies, I was more focusing on the quarantine time as opposed to a total lock-down. 

 

My local KFC does delivery. I feel like this is an important thing to note as well. 

 



Ah, yes. If you individually need to quarantine yourself for a short period (say due to being exposed to the virus at work), services like ubereats, and countdown delivery would mean little risk of going hungry for anybody in a major urban area, with some money on a credit card.


4647 posts

Uber Geek


  #2436831 12-Mar-2020 14:12
Send private message

Batman:

 

surfisup1000:

 

Are you sure?  I think we need to study the science.

 

https://www.businessinsider.com.au/coronavirus-case-children-infants-low-disease-expert-explain-why-2020-2?r=US&IR=T

 

It appears very few kids get infected. And, those that do have a very high recovery rate. 

 

Early days yet though, but, I think we should gather more data before they close schools. 

 

 

this is what i don't understand about how people think.

 

the question you have to ask - is low risk is good enough.

 

low risk is not good enough.

 

no risk is better. shutting down school means no risk of transmission in the school.

 

 

But, the topic is taking a 'balanced' approach.   

 

You look at the advantages of closing a school, but none of the disadvantages. 

 

Come on, do some critical thinking!!

 

 

 

 


3179 posts

Uber Geek


  #2436834 12-Mar-2020 14:12
Send private message

buying shares in Ubereats.





Common sense is not as common as you think.


Stu

Hammered
5442 posts

Uber Geek

Moderator
Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #2436854 12-Mar-2020 14:30
Send private message

[conspiracytheory]"Covid-19: Brought to you by Amazon, AliExpress, UberEats, and Countdown and New World home deliveries. Forget about going to the store, we'll bring it right to your door!"[/conspiracytheory]

 

 

 

But seriously, I wouldn't be surprised if UberEats and the supermarkets started advertising for more drivers in the near future, if they aren't already.





Keep calm, and carry on posting.

 

 

 

Click to see full size Click to see full size


Mad Scientist
22212 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #2436888 12-Mar-2020 15:00
Send private message

surfisup1000:

 

But, the topic is taking a 'balanced' approach.   

 

You look at the advantages of closing a school, but none of the disadvantages. 

 

Come on, do some critical thinking!!

 

 

There are no disadvantages once their parents, teachers and their parents and grandparents are dead so, no I didn't look at them.





Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


199 posts

Master Geek


  #2436930 12-Mar-2020 15:04
Send private message

Scott3:

 

While the survival rate of school aged children for COVID-19 appears to exceed 99.8%, they are quite capable of catching it and spreading it.

 

 

 

 

This is roughly the same as the survival rate of children who catch measles in a developed country (2 deaths in every 1000 cases expected). I sure as hell wouldn't let my unvaccinated* kids go to school full of other unvaccinated kids during a measles epidemic - not sure why it would be any different during this epidemic (if the danger is the same).

 

 

 

* of course my children are vaccinated against measles - but in this scenario the disease we're talking about has no vaccine available.


 1 | 2 | 3
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

OPPO Find X2 Lite brings flagship features to mid-range 5G smartphone
Posted 29-May-2020 12:52


Sony introduces the digital camera ZV-1 for content creators
Posted 27-May-2020 12:47


Samsung Announces 2020 QLED TV Range
Posted 20-May-2020 16:29


D-Link A/NZ launches AI-Powered body temperature measuring system
Posted 20-May-2020 16:22


NortonLifeLock Online Banking Protection now available for New Zealand banks
Posted 20-May-2020 16:14


SD Express delivers new gigabyte speeds for SD memory cards
Posted 20-May-2020 15:00


D-Link A/NZ launches Nuclias cloud managed network solution hosted in Australia
Posted 11-May-2020 17:53


Logitech introduces new video streaming solution for home studios
Posted 11-May-2020 17:48


Next generation Volvo cars to be powered by Luminar LiDAR technology
Posted 7-May-2020 13:56


D-Link A/NZ launches Wi-Fi Certified EasyMesh system
Posted 7-May-2020 13:51


Spark teams up with Microsoft to bring Xbox All Access to New Zealand
Posted 7-May-2020 13:01


Microsoft plans to establish its first datacenter region in New Zealand
Posted 6-May-2020 11:35


Genesis School-gen has joined forces with Mind Lab Kids
Posted 1-May-2020 12:53


Malwarebytes expands into privacy with fast, frictionless VPN
Posted 30-Apr-2020 16:06


Kordia to donate TV airtime on Channel 200 to community groups
Posted 30-Apr-2020 16:00



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.