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Mad Scientist
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  #2008913 6-May-2018 21:06
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Fred99:

 

Batman:

 

It's a van.

 

 

Obviously a high performance racing van with those mags - and rear disks.

 

 

toyota estima, completely stock





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  #2008914 6-May-2018 21:07
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Sidestep:

 

Fred99:

 

Technofreak:

 

As for the surface of the disks they look perfectly OK as well. I don't see any pitting, just discolouration which is normal. The discolouration can differ depending in the composition of the pads.

 

 

Maybe I've got an advantage as I'm viewing on a calibrated IPS monitor, but I see pitting and I'm highly confident that I'm not seeing things.

 

Perhaps this will make it more clear(adjusted contrast etc):

 

Yes - they'll probably work fine, though it probably means that pads will wear more quickly, but these don't look like any "new" disks I've ever seen.

 

 

You're right there's some pitting and scoring. I'm guessing since installation OP has parked in a damp and/or salty location?

 

Edit-removed pic from quote

 

 

never immersed water, nor visited beach. is parked outdoors.





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  #2008916 6-May-2018 21:11
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gzt:
Batman:

 

Fred99:

 

 

 

Not sure that it would apply to your particular model of car, but if a common and relatively ordinary one then aftermarket disks are perhaps $100/ pair from Supercheap, BNT etc, reasonable quality pads perhaps $50 for a set, so all up costs about $300.  There are some possible complications if DIY change the rear pads/disks, the workshop should have the tools and know what they're doing.  I'd be surprised if labour would have been two hours to do the whole job - front and rears.

 

 

 

I think you've probably been ripped off.

 

 

 

It's possible that if the vehicle is a "performance" model, and has drilled rotors, larger non-standard rotors, special compound performance pads etc specified as OEM, then parts cost could be high, sometimes extremely high, but for an ordinary car - then nope.  Parts should be very cheap, easy to obtain, and it's a simple job to change them over.

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's a van, did not check supercheap auto rotor prices. I think it was something like $250 a pair of rotors. There or thereabouts.

 


Kind of off topic personally I'd look at an established trade supplier like partmaster or bnt. Partmaster is showing estima rear rotors for $72+ over the counter. No idea if that's correct for the model year. I'm guessing estima from previous threads. Sometimes imo you are better off with a local actual mechanic.

 

noted. and superb memory!

 

now if you can recommend partmaster for house building i reckon building a house might cost me a bit less ;)





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  #2008917 6-May-2018 21:13
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Fred99:

 

Technofreak:

 

 

 

As for the surface of the disks they look perfectly OK as well. I don't see any pitting, just discolouration which is normal. The discolouration can differ depending in the composition of the pads.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maybe I've got an advantage as I'm viewing on a calibrated IPS monitor, but I see pitting and I'm highly confident that I'm not seeing things.

 

Perhaps this will make it more clear(adjusted contrast etc):

 

 

Yes - they'll probably work fine, though it probably means that pads will wear more quickly, but these don't look like any "new" disks I've ever seen.

 

 

well the new pads are not technically not new as they were used on the old rotors for a week or two (can't remember exact ks). but i'm not going to waste my energy worrying about that, moved on.





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  #2008928 6-May-2018 21:44
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A lot of European cars have Geomet coatings on their rotors so they look nicer. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gKtxO0ffjL8 

Spend money on a quality car and it has a quality finish.


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  #2008942 6-May-2018 22:49
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Just for interests sake, I discovered Znoelli http://www.znoelli.co.nz/ when I was searching for cheaper discs and pads for my Mondeo. Znoelli do performance brake parts. The low end Znoelli parts worked out slightly cheaper than Ford parts but as they were having a sale at the time, I got them 20% cheaper. They list a variety of agents on their website for ease of purchase/installing. Very happy with them.


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  #2009234 7-May-2018 14:15
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Just paint 'em bro

 

 

 

 

Disclaimer:

 

DON'T paint them like that ^ you'll end up ruining the brakes and having to replace parts.

 

 

 

I haven't personally seen brake rotors start to get that level of surface rust so quickly before - however as has been suggested by others, it could be down the makeup of the steel in the rotor.

 

 

 

I am planning to replace the rotors in my Commodore later this year, but before they are installed on the car i will be giving them a nice coat of black header paint to help keep them from looking rusty so quickly afterwards


 
 
 
 


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  #2009353 7-May-2018 16:28
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I've had a few bad experiences with aftermarket brake pads, but I've been impressed with the performance of Toyota OEM brakes.

 

When pressed, guys like Repco will tell you that they have serveral grades of pads (4 types for my old Toyota) and in my case all but one underperform compared to OEM. The set that did perform as good as OEM cost more than OEM, so that made the decision easy - OEM pads for me. It pays to check the costs, because often there is little to be saved in using non-OEM Toyota parts, and the reduction in cost isn't proportional to the reduction in performance.

 

A few years back I did the front disks on a broke friends 300,000km old Nissan - Repco wanted $90 a side for solid rotors (yuck!) and Auto-Stop wanted $45 a side for proper vented rotors (superior to the solids) - it really pays to shop around and compare quality as well as price.

 

In the OP's case, while surface rust is normal, I've not seen that powdery rust on in-use disks before. Such scoring on near new disks also suggests they are a softer grade of metal. On the rears which hardly do any work, I'd expect it to take weeks for the machining marks to wear off and months to start seeing any appreciable scoring. Is this a racing van or something?




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  #2009419 7-May-2018 17:40
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it is now a few months down the track sorry. it started rusting immediately, but i am posting this thread and pics a few many months down the line.





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  #2009442 7-May-2018 18:42
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how long are we talking?  did the pitting on the rotor surface occur recently?




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  #2009449 7-May-2018 18:51
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hsvhel:

 

how long are we talking?  did the pitting on the rotor surface occur recently?

 

 

sorry I don't know about the rotors, I was just making a post about the rusting hub bit that happened from week 2.

 

i think it's about 6 months, maybe 2-3000ks. i can take a look at the stickers etc if it really is important?





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  #2009451 7-May-2018 18:56
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it's not super critical, but you have pitting that doesn't seem right on the rotor surface.  the rusting is normal and happens, but the pitting is an unusual wear

 

 

 

EDIT: Spelling


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  #2009456 7-May-2018 19:03
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hsvhel:

 

it's not super critical, but you have pitting that doesn't seem right on the rotor surface.  the rusting is normal and happens, but the pitting is an unusual wear

 

 

 

EDIT: Spelling

 



That looks more like glazing, Low quality pads and discs can leave remnants on each other.
I'll go grab a photo of my rotors and hubs as I replaced my brakes 8 months ago and they were not geomet coated either. (Bilstein Brand)

 

Daily driven and I am not a light braker, Maybe 25,000KM on them.
Don't forget brake dust is literally iron filings. Its gonna rust... 


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  #2009504 7-May-2018 19:28
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Here's a rear disk:

 

 

Less pitting, minor scoring.

 

For reference, that's the original rear disk on a 1998 Mx5 that's done about 120,000km, is parked outside a lot, we live near the sea, AFAIK the pads are original, the disk has perhaps less than 1mm wear based on the thickness of the lip on the edge.

 

That's one reason why I'm surprised that the photos posted of a supposedly new disk looked so bad.

 

Edit after seeing post from coil above, which I assume is a front disk - not rear?


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  #2009624 7-May-2018 21:32
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jaymz:

 

Just paint 'em bro

 

 

Disclaimer:

 

DON'T paint them like that ^ you'll end up ruining the brakes and having to replace parts.

 

 

I *really* hope that our WOF would fail brakes like that ...


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