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  Reply # 1605858 7-Aug-2016 14:02

Yes, even though I can see the Canterbury University buildings from our back yard, the download has to take the long "slow" road via Auckland. Our location on every website comes up as Auckland. I assume this is a cheaper way for MR to operate?

 

Didn't know what CGNAT was so asked Dr. Google;

 

"CGNAT enables organizations to deliver transparent IPv4 connectivity and a seamless user experience while oversubscribing their limited global IPv4 addresses. Carriers can assign local (private) IPv4 addresses in their access network, and use a centralized device to manage the address translation to the global (public) Internet."

 

I assume this all means that when more subscribers come online in the evening, they all get squashed together through the MR system, and the result is that everything slows down?

 

Do the other ISP's, eg Spark, Vodafone, BigPipe, Orcon, Slingshot etc, not use CGNAT?


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  Reply # 1605882 7-Aug-2016 14:34
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Bigpipe does but you can opt out with a static IP. Spark, Vodafone, 2degrees, Slingshot, etc do not use CGNAT at this stage. CGNAT is unlikely to be the cause of peak time speed issues.

 

The reason CGNAT is becoming more prevalent is the available IPv4 address pool has run out - newer ISPs can't get enough addresses to assign a unique IPv4 address to each customer. The bigger, older ISPs still have enough available addresses to give one out to each customer, but this does have the potential to change in the future as well.

 

The solution to this is IPv6 (a much bigger address space, available by default on 2degrees, and I believe Orcon). Unfortunately some providers have their heads in the sand on deploying it. Many online content providers use it (Google + Facebook, for example) however if the ISPs aren't implementing it, and some content providers aren't, it turns into a bit of a chicken/egg situation.

 

Regarding peak time speed issues: If for example all of the MR traffic from CHCH has to go up to Auckland via a 1Gbps link, and during peak time that 1Gbps link is saturated, you'll notice your traffic slows down. At 3am when there's no one else using the internet, you'll find speeds are better. The same applies if the international pipe out to the wider internet isn't big enough to cope with peak time demand.


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1605896 7-Aug-2016 14:58
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k1w1k1d:

 

Yes, even though I can see the Canterbury University buildings from our back yard, the download has to take the long "slow" road via Auckland. Our location on every website comes up as Auckland. I assume this is a cheaper way for MR to operate?

 

 

long yes, slow no, long because of the ping time but that wont affect your download speed inside NZ unless its 100+ms. slow not even close im sure many people on here on 100+mbps connections could hit line speeds getting files from U for C. The slow is because of your ISP, nothing else.

 

k1w1k1d:

 

I assume this all means that when more subscribers come online in the evening, they all get squashed together through the MR system, and the result is that everything slows down?

 

Do the other ISP's, eg Spark, Vodafone, BigPipe, Orcon, Slingshot etc, not use CGNAT?

 

 

lots of other ISPs use it, its just a way of getting more IP addresses for their uses out of the few the ISP has. ie the isp has 10 IP addresses but they can run many hundreds of users of those 10 IP addresses. It shouldnt affect your speed in any way.

 

i believe the reason My replublic is slow is that they only have low bandwidth handovers in the local areas so they would be congesting in peak times. Most ISP's have 10Gbps handovers in most locations, i dont believe my republic does


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  Reply # 1605898 7-Aug-2016 15:13
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Jase2985:

 

i believe the reason My replublic is slow is that they only have low bandwidth handovers in the local areas so they would be congesting in peak times. Most ISP's have 10Gbps handovers in most locations, i dont believe my republic does

 

 

My understanding was MR only had 1Gbps backhaul at every handover up until a few months ago. A big player would likely haver multiple 10Gbps backhaul links.

 

Obviously this just comes down to economics - if you're a small provider with say a couple of hundred customers in a region you're potentially going to be losing money just with the cost of the backhaul. This is why residential ISP's have become a numbers game - you need lots of customers just to cover the cost of infrastructure. Based on MR needing connectivity in so many interconnect areas to provide nationwide connectivity their monthly costs of this will be very significant.

 

From the current situation there are two options (and this applies regardless of the RSP) - upgrade the backhaul to fix the issue or delay any upgrades because they don't stack up financially with current customer numbers.

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1605902 7-Aug-2016 15:17
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k1w1k1d:

 

 

 

I assume this all means that when more subscribers come online in the evening, they all get squashed together through the MR system, and the result is that everything slows down?

 

Do the other ISP's, eg Spark, Vodafone, BigPipe, Orcon, Slingshot etc, not use CGNAT?

 

 

CG-NAT operates in exactly the same way as your router at home - a RSP has a single (or pool) of IPV4 address that are shared between all customers who sit on a local (NAT) IP range. This does not slow things down.

 

Mobile data connections in NZ all use CG-NAT by default, and some other providers such as Flip and Bigpipe all use CG-NAT.

 

 


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  Reply # 1605905 7-Aug-2016 15:31
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sbiddle:

 

 

 

Obviously this just comes down to economics - if you're a small provider with say a couple of hundred customers in a region you're potentially going to be losing money just with the cost of the backhaul. This is why residential ISP's have become a numbers game - you need lots of customers just to cover the cost of infrastructure. Based on MR needing connectivity in so many interconnect areas to provide nationwide connectivity their monthly costs of this will be very significant.

 

 

 

 

I believe thats why the likes of big pipe are going region by region to ensure they have enough customers to support their expansions. as opposed to just going all out nation wide.


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  Reply # 1605907 7-Aug-2016 15:52
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Jase2985:

 

sbiddle:

 

 

 

Obviously this just comes down to economics - if you're a small provider with say a couple of hundred customers in a region you're potentially going to be losing money just with the cost of the backhaul. This is why residential ISP's have become a numbers game - you need lots of customers just to cover the cost of infrastructure. Based on MR needing connectivity in so many interconnect areas to provide nationwide connectivity their monthly costs of this will be very significant.

 

 

 

 

I believe thats why the likes of big pipe are going region by region to ensure they have enough customers to support their expansions. as opposed to just going all out nation wide.

 

 

Exactly. Chorus UFB tail extensions will be a bit of a game changer in that respect though.




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  Reply # 1605912 7-Aug-2016 16:00

Thanks for the replies guys. Very enlightening.

 

Looks like MR may need to upgrade their systems before too many dissatisfied customers jump ship when they come off contract, or get that p***** off that they just pay the disconnection fee and leave. I am not on contract, but will hang in for a bit longer to see if they can come up with a solution.


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  Reply # 1605937 7-Aug-2016 16:13
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k1w1k1d:

 

my dedicated fibre line from the Enable cabinet at the end of the street to my ONT

 

 

By the way, you don't have a dedicated fibre line. The fibre line you're using is shared with about two dozen of your neighbours. If you want dedicated fibre you'll need to pay way more than ~$100/month.


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  Reply # 1605961 7-Aug-2016 16:24
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k1w1k1d:

 

Thanks for the replies guys. Very enlightening.

 

Looks like MR may need to upgrade their systems before too many dissatisfied customers jump ship when they come off contract, or get that p***** off that they just pay the disconnection fee and leave. I am not on contract, but will hang in for a bit longer to see if they can come up with a solution.

 

 

If they are failing to deliver what they promised in the advertising then you should not be paying anything to leave. Just make sure you have a good record of complaints about the service when you do move ISP.

 

I am amazed that people are prepared to give ISPs the length of time they do to sort problems out. If your power was out for the length of time that ISPs provide broken service for then there would be rioting outside their offices.





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  Reply # 1605974 7-Aug-2016 17:25

It really seems to be hit and miss with our connection. Mostly it does run just fine but it is always at peak times that it slows down, which I think points to a lack of capacity on MyRepublic's network when all their customers are using the internet. I've noticed that most people complaining are in Christchurch so maybe they just don't have enough backhaul for all their Christchurch customers.

 

4.30pm Saturday:

 

 

5pm Sunday:

 




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  Reply # 1605975 7-Aug-2016 17:28

"By the way, you don't have a dedicated fibre line. The fibre line you're using is shared with about two dozen of your neighbours."

 

I was referring to the fibre strand that was blown through the underground conduit from our ETP to the cabinet.


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  Reply # 1605977 7-Aug-2016 17:38
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Chorus UFB tail extensions are not particularly cheap. In some cases you are better off with a Point of Presence. Your still gonna need some decent numbers to justify moving into a particular area.

 

At the end of the day if you are unhappy with the speeds and they are not fixing it then move somewhere else. There are also plenty of providers who offer no contract terms now. You generally have to pay the connection fee, but at least if it doesn't work out you can leave without the problems a contract causes.






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  Reply # 1605991 7-Aug-2016 17:54
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k1w1k1d:

 

"By the way, you don't have a dedicated fibre line. The fibre line you're using is shared with about two dozen of your neighbours."

 

I was referring to the fibre strand that was blown through the underground conduit from our ETP to the cabinet.

 

 

 

 

In the context of your post with that quote, the comment made is entirely accurate. You are on a shared resource for the fibre connectivity from the LFC equipment to your ONT.

 

 

 

Cheers - N

 

 


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  Reply # 1605994 7-Aug-2016 17:56
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k1w1k1d:

 

"By the way, you don't have a dedicated fibre line. The fibre line you're using is shared with about two dozen of your neighbours."

 

I was referring to the fibre strand that was blown through the underground conduit from our ETP to the cabinet.

 

 

So how I believe it works is you have a line from the LFC (Local Fibre Carrier) back to the ISP's handover, some of this will be virtual circuits some physical either way that is not really much of a concern. The speeds of the ports you can use to hand over are 1Gbps ~ 10G etc.. If this handover port overloaded OR the backhaul from the handover to the rest of the network is congested then everyone connected via that handover will have a slowdown. All of this stuff is full duplex, which is why you might see download congestion affected, but not upload. 

 

So the ISP needs to manage the network traffic. If it is overloaded, they may need to buy more ports, upgrade the ports speed, upgrade the handover or add more Backhaul bandwidth. The ISP will identify and raise a query with the LFC if they think the congestion is occurring inside the LFC section of the network.

 

Ask the ISP to rectify the problem, if they fail to do so then change. I very much doubt this will be a problem with the LFC. If you are on a contract then that is what you signed up for, you will need to take it up with the ISP.






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