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BDFL - Memuneh
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  # 2157259 9-Jan-2019 21:19
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From Vanity Fair:

 

 

n February 2016, Donald Trump the candidate had no idea he was required by law to put a transition team in place to initiate preparations to run the federal government. Months later, after he had clinched the nomination, he still didn’t get that the people he’d begrudgingly allowed Chris Christie to hire for the job had to be paid, and tried to shutter the whole operation because he thought transition workers were “stealing” his money. In November, after he had won the election, President-Elect Slow-on-the-Uptake fired everyone who’d been manning the transition team, threw their work in the trash, and decided, per Michael Lewis, that he was going to handle things “more or less by himself,” a bone-chilling determination that he made right around the time it came out that he thought Barack Obama’s West Wing staff came with the White House. In the words of his own campaign chairman-turned-senior adviser, Trump didn’t “know anything,” and worse, he didn’t “give a shit.” And apparently, not much has changed since then, only now, he’s like, y‘know, the actual president.

 

The Washington Post reports that, two weeks after Trump shut down the government over his ridiculous border wall, the administration—only then!—“recognized . . . the breadth of the potential impact” of the president’s actions. In other words, the people in charge of the most powerful nation in the world evidently had no idea that the government actually does stuff, and that when it runs out of money, that stuff ceases to function:

 

That Trump, whose mental impairment is made obvious every time he opens his mouth or sends out a tweet, wouldn’t understand the impact of a government shutdown is entirely wholly unsurprising. Still, you might think that someone in his administration—perhaps the people who just got a sweet raise?—would have been aware of the consequences ahead of time. But you’d think wrong!

 





 
 
 
 


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  # 2157325 10-Jan-2019 08:42
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The Washington Post - Trump’s Oval Office address was a pure propaganda opportunity. Networks shouldn’t allow it next time.

 


After Tuesday night’s debacle in the Oval Office, television network executives should be spending the day in their spacious offices practicing a simple word: No.

 

No, Mr. President, you may not break into prime-time programming to fundraise and mislead.

 

They’ll need to practice because you can be sure that the request will come again. And again.

 

Let’s be clear: There was no - zero - news in President Trump’s address to the nation last night.

 

There were high-drama quotes: “crisis of the soul.”

 

There was fearmongering: “I’ve met with dozens of families whose loved ones were stolen by illegal immigration.”

 

But there wasn’t anything of substance that we haven’t heard many times before. ...

 

 





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  # 2157327 10-Jan-2019 08:48
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The New York Times - The Crisis Is in the Oval Office

 

The president has exaggerated threats but ignored the hazards his border policies created.

 


How fitting is it that President Trump’s first Oval Office address, which he requested be televised live in prime time by every major network, was aimed at stirring up the American public about a crisis largely of his own making?

 

Not that the border crisis is one of Mr. Trump’s self-serving political fictions - like the deep state or widespread voter fraud.

 

It may have started out that way, but the situation has, with the president’s nurturing, become something far more tragic.

 

Pursuing poorly thought-out and even more poorly executed policies on the pretext of battling a nonexistent national security crisis, Mr. Trump has helped create a pressing humanitarian one. ...

 

 





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  # 2157363 10-Jan-2019 10:25
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Sideface's link (above) is worth a read. Note that this not an op-ed piece or one journalist's vendetta. It comes from the Editorial Board itself.

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

From the New York Times Editorial Board January 8th 2019. The editorial board represents the opinions of the board, its editor and the publisher. It is separate from the newsroom and the Op-Ed section.

 

How fitting is it that President Trump’s first Oval Office address, which he requested be televised live in prime time by every major network, was aimed at stirring up the American public about a crisis largely of his own making?

 

Not that the border crisis is one of Mr. Trump’s self-serving political fictions — like the deep state or widespread voter fraud. It may have started out that way, but the situation has, with the president’s nurturing, become something far more tragic.

 

Pursuing poorly thought-out and even more poorly executed policies on the pretext of battling a nonexistent national security crisis, Mr. Trump has helped create a pressing humanitarian one. Desperate migrant families being detained en masse at the border are overwhelming a system pushed beyond its limits by an administration that chose to ignore the implications of its actions — overcrowding, children falling gravely ill and, paradoxically, the haphazard release of throngs of detainees into border communities stretching from California to Texas.

 

Mr. Trump is now invoking the urgency of the situation as a justification for pursuing more wasteful, hard-line measures that most Americans do not support, chiefly the ludicrous border wall over which he has shut down critical pieces of the government. The president and his enablers have been busily knitting together inaccurate data, misleading anecdotes, exaggerations and other “alternative facts” about the flow of criminals, drugs and terrorists across the southern border. He seems to hope he can paint a dystopian landscape of security threats and human suffering so dire that the American people will rally to his side and pressure congressional Democrats to succumb to his demands for a towering wall — preferably concrete, but at this point, it seems, steel will suffice.

 

Failing that, Mr. Trump has also been floating the possibility of stiff-arming Congress altogether. With his advisers increasingly anxious that Republican lawmakers are poised to abandon them on the shutdown, the president has raised the threat of declaring a national emergency, which he thinks would allow him to command the Pentagon to build his wall.

 

Such a move would prompt a swift and furious legal challenge, if not a full-blown constitutional crisis, that could drag on indefinitely. It would, however, also give Mr. Trump a way to reach a wall-free funding deal with Congress without losing face, thus weaselling out of the shutdown box into which he has nailed himself.

 

The border wall began life as an applause line at Mr. Trump’s rallies, and it has endured as the rare — perhaps even sole — policy objective that actually matters to him. The substance of true border security may not interest him much, but this symbol sure does.

 

While Mr. Trump proved a wily campaigner and political street fighter, as president he has been painfully out of his element. Two years in, he remains ill suited to the complicated, thankless, often grinding work of leading the nation. Governance clearly bores him, as do policy details both foreign and domestic. He has proved a poor judge of talent. He prefers grandstanding to negotiating, and he continues to have trouble with the whole concept of checks and balances. While the Republican base remains enamored of him, most of the electora

 

From the New York Times Editorial Board January 8th 2019. The editorial board represents the opinions of the board, its editor and the publisher. It is separate from the newsroom and the Op-Ed section.

 

How fitting is it that President Trump’s first Oval Office address, which he requested be televised live in prime time by every major network, was aimed at stirring up the American public about a crisis largely of his own making?

 

Not that the border crisis is one of Mr. Trump’s self-serving political fictions — like the deep state or widespread voter fraud. It may have started out that way, but the situation has, with the president’s nurturing, become something far more tragic.

 

Pursuing poorly thought-out and even more poorly executed policies on the pretext of battling a nonexistent national security crisis, Mr. Trump has helped create a pressing humanitarian one. Desperate migrant families being detained en masse at the border are overwhelming a system pushed beyond its limits by an administration that chose to ignore the implications of its actions — overcrowding, children falling gravely ill and, paradoxically, the haphazard release of throngs of detainees into border communities stretching from California to Texas.

 

Mr. Trump is now invoking the urgency of the situation as a justification for pursuing more wasteful, hard-line measures that most Americans do not support, chiefly the ludicrous border wall over which he has shut down critical pieces of the government. The president and his enablers have been busily knitting together inaccurate data, misleading anecdotes, exaggerations and other “alternative facts” about the flow of criminals, drugs and terrorists across the southern border. He seems to hope he can paint a dystopian landscape of security threats and human suffering so dire that the American people will rally to his side and pressure congressional Democrats to succumb to his demands for a towering wall — preferably concrete, but at this point, it seems, steel will suffice.

 

Failing that, Mr. Trump has also been floating the possibility of stiff-arming Congress altogether. With his advisers increasingly anxious that Republican lawmakers are poised to abandon them on the shutdown, the president has raised the threat of declaring a national emergency, which he thinks would allow him to command the Pentagon to build his wall.

 

Such a move would prompt a swift and furious legal challenge, if not a full-blown constitutional crisis, that could drag on indefinitely. It would, however, also give Mr. Trump a way to reach a wall-free funding deal with Congress without losing face, thus weaselling out of the shutdown box into which he has nailed himself.

 

The border wall began life as an applause line at Mr. Trump’s rallies, and it has endured as the rare — perhaps even sole — policy objective that actually matters to him. The substance of true border security may not interest him much, but this symbol sure does.

 

While Mr. Trump proved a wily campaigner and political street fighter, as president he has been painfully out of his element. Two years in, he remains ill suited to the complicated, thankless, often grinding work of leading the nation. Governance clearly bores him, as do policy details both foreign and domestic. He has proved a poor judge of talent. He prefers grandstanding to negotiating, and he continues to have trouble with the whole concept of checks and balances. While the Republican base remains enamored of him, most of the electorate has grown weary of his outrages and antics.

 

Which is why, with his wall on the line, Mr. Trump so desperately needs to convince the American people that they are facing an acute crisis — maybe even a bona fide emergency.

 

In times of trouble, an anxious public looks to its leaders, and the ability to telegraph strength, decisiveness and certitude assumes greater value than in periods of calm and prosperity. Circle-the-wagons patriotism, maybe even a little jingoism, becomes more appealing. People long to feel protected.

 

With his demagogy, Mr. Trump managed to fuel a sense of insecurity and unease throughout his campaign, along with the idea that he alone could Make America Great Again. In office, he has attempted to perpetuate that angst by proclaiming existential threats to the Republic, be they migrant caravans storming the border, Muslim terrorists flooding the airports or violent immigrants roaming the countryside. Shutting down the government is only the most recent effort at getting what he wants by traumatizing the nation he has sworn to serve.

 

Were Mr. Trump truly interested in securing the border, and easing the suffering his policies are making worse, there are immediate steps he could take. For starters, he could end this wretched shutdown so that the people responsible for protecting the border can get paid, immigration judges can return to processing asylum claims and, yes, the physical and virtual barriers already in place can be maintained and perhaps even improved.

 

Beyond that, he would need to ease up on the my-way-or-the-highway swagger and sit down for a real discussion with lawmakers about how to address the deep dysfunction of this nation’s immigration system.

 

None of which would be as sensational as grabbing some prime-time airtime.

 

It would, however, be a sign that the president is at last getting serious about immigration concerns he has thus far done nothing but exacerbate.





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  # 2157364 10-Jan-2019 10:30
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And he just walked off from talks about ending the shutting down. Asking Democrats if they will pass legislation with $5 bi for the wall they responded "No" so he just said "Nothing else to talk" and walked away.

 

Screaming baby...





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  # 2157367 10-Jan-2019 10:37
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The New York Times - Trump Storms Out of White House Meeting with Democrats on Shutdown

 

Jan. 9, 2019

 


WASHINGTON — President Trump slammed his hand on a table and stormed out of a White House meeting with congressional leaders on Wednesday after Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California said she would not fund a wall along the southern border, dramatically escalating the confrontation over the government shutdown.

 

Stunned Democrats emerged from the White House meeting declaring that Mr. Trump had thrown a “temper tantrum.”

The president’s allies accused Democrats of refusing to negotiate.

Then he tweeted that the meeting was “a total waste of time.”

 

 





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  # 2157369 10-Jan-2019 10:40
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freitasm:

 

And he just walked off from talks about ending the shutting down.

 

Asking Democrats if they will pass legislation with $5 bi for the wall they responded "No" so he just said "Nothing else to talk" and walked away.

 

Screaming baby...

 

 





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  # 2157373 10-Jan-2019 10:44
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Probably how he did many deals. I'm Donald Trump, sign this or no one in this hick town will deal with you again. Or maybe he did deals and they all laughed what a great deal it was for them, hence he went bankrupt more than once (I think)


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  # 2157401 10-Jan-2019 11:25
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Pelosi says (unlike Trump) the furloughed workers cannot ask their dad for money

 

My take is she could just stand their ground, offering common sense and lets debate the wall later (which they are), BUT she is also having a few digs at Trump. I feel she wants him to crack, or have a terrible outburst, or use the emergency card (which will go to court and fail). Maybe she wants to dig at him to ensure he holds out, keeps the Govt shutdown, as that will hurt the WH and GOP even more.

 

If she acted "nice" Trump would probably have an excuse to be "nice" back, and get himself out of trouble. I feel the DEMs want him to stay in trouble as long as possible


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  # 2157426 10-Jan-2019 11:36
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"Unfortunately, the President just got up and walked out," Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said. "He asked Speaker (Nancy) Pelosi, 'Will you agree to my wall?' She said no. And he just got up and said, 'Then we have nothing to discuss,' and he just walked out. Again, we saw a temper tantrum because he couldn't get his way, and he just walked out of the meeting."

 

A source familiar with what happened inside the room said Trump ended the meeting by standing up and announcing "bye bye" before turning and walking out.

 

As Democrats repeatedly told the President to open the government and deal with the border security fight after, the President continued to reject them as unwilling to have an actual negotiation, another source said.

 

Schumer then asked Trump, "Why won't you open the government and stop hurting people?"

 

Trump responded bluntly, "Because then you won't give me what I want."

 

 

 

 

 

Second bold, he accuses DEMS of not negotiating, but he then confirms he doesn't want to negotiate (third bold)

 

 

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  # 2157441 10-Jan-2019 11:58
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This is a crock

 

 

 

Sen. John Kennedy, a Republican from Louisiana, told reporters President Trump was "resolute" during a meeting with the GOP members of Congress.

 

"The President was resolute. He's like — I'm not from Missouri, but I've heard this story my whole life — he's like the Missouri mule who sits down in the mud and says, 'I'm not moving.' He's resolute. It doesn't look to me like he's going to give an inch," Kennedy said.

 

The lawmaker put the onus on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, claiming that she hates Trump and "until she can flip those emotions it's going to be hard to make any progress."

 

 

 

 

 

So, this guy says Trump is 110% stubborn. Ok, so because of that, its good and ok for him, but its bad for Pelosi to dig her toes in as well?

 

She wants to negotiate the wall, he wants to not negotiate and hold 800,000 hostage (plus those businesses and individuals who service these departments)


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  # 2157475 10-Jan-2019 12:56
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How did we ever get the idea that Americans are somehow 'special'?





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  # 2157542 10-Jan-2019 14:00
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geekIT:

 

How did we ever get the idea that Americans are somehow 'special'?

 

 

The Americans told us.




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  # 2157546 10-Jan-2019 14:09
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geekIT:

 

How did we ever get the idea that Americans are somehow 'special'?

 

 

Why from Americans, of course.


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