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  # 2200718 18-Mar-2019 11:52
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networkn:

 

Trust me, even if you are slightly tempted, just dont. Trust me as someone who accidentally saw some of it, you'll never be the same again.

 

 

Never fear, I'm doing my best to avoid; on Saturday I came across an Australian site (I think) which started autoplaying the video - thankfully I moved fast enough to avoid seeing anything graphic.

 

I'm at a loss as to why anyone would be interested in watching this, let alone actively seek it out; to those who have watched it, I sure hope they think long, hard and deeply about the real reasons why they have done so.


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  # 2200720 18-Mar-2019 11:57
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freitasm: It shows the start then go to experts telling how to filter, report or disable these videos.

 

 

Thanks for checking, not something I was willing to do; I would have been surprised if the WP had been doing something quite so stupid.


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  # 2200721 18-Mar-2019 11:58
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networkn:

 

Bluntj: He committed the crime in NZ under our laws and should serve ALL his punishment here, away from his friends and family. He should be treated no different to any other non national criminal.  

 

He's an Australian national and I highly object, as a tax payer, to footing the bill for housing him (which will likely cost significantly more due to his offending type) for what is possibly going to be 60 years.

 

If we foot the bill, I would support subcontracting it out to a Thai MaxSec Prison, which would cost a fraction of the same thing here. I don't want him on our soil. 

 

Suck's when the shoe is on the other foot - Australia has a policy of exporting Immigrant (ex)crim's back to their country of origin, which many in this country object to. You might also find that there are more kiwi's in Aussie jails (than Aussies in kiwi jails) that they would gladly dump on the kiwi tax payer.

 

I suspect AU will be putting as much distance between themselves and this guy as possible - they won't want to take responsibility for incarcerating him because that is acknowledging some degree of national culpability. 


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  # 2200724 18-Mar-2019 12:00
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networkn:

 

...  In terms of closure for the victims, I believe a trial whilst traumatising for them, would be best perhaps, but his sentence (the chances of which will be life without the possibility of parole - die in prison) should be served in Australia.

 

I feel it would be grossly unfair for the NZ Taxpayer to wear this cost.

 

 


IRONY ALERT :
  A new jail is being built in Grafton - Tarrant’s Australian hometown - that will house 1,700 inmates and employ 600 locals.  Yes, really.   😠

 


ref. The Washington Post





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  # 2200734 18-Mar-2019 12:27
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Batman:

freitasm: If people put all this anger into getting racism out of the way...


And there, we have one on the news now.


There's a lot of work to do it appears


https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12213536


I get the impression from the article the person is known to the police and it is his regular activity to get drunk and go to the railway station and abuse people. Some additional action is required here. Perhaps letting a judge decide what the next step is for this person.

gzt

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  # 2200741 18-Mar-2019 12:39
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News site excerpts from Tarrent's manifesto indicate Tarrent intended to use a possible trial much as Brevik did to read more manifesto type stuff.



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  # 2200744 18-Mar-2019 12:43
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tripper1000:

 

I suspect AU will be putting as much distance between themselves and this guy as possible - they won't want to take responsibility for incarcerating him because that is acknowledging some degree of national culpability. 

 

 

No I don't think so.  Not from talking to my friends in Aus anyway, nor from reading the main news sites.

 

It's (hopefully) a wake-up call, my fear that as days go on and the invitable dominance of this story on the front pages is replaced with something else in the relentless barrage of bad stuff that's happening, people will think of something else.

 

Despite some from a younger generation seeming to think that Anzac day is an excuse to have a day off, the bonds are still there.

 

I'd be happy if there was some formal recognition this year on Anzac day, from both governments, that our young men and women fought and died together against forces of evil, and that those evils are returning in a new wave of fascism.  We have a duty to continue to respect what they died for, and to continue to protect the future generation.

 

Lest we forget.

 

 


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  # 2200756 18-Mar-2019 12:58
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An article By Nigel Latta (worth reading)

 

 

 

We were not all attacked… only some of us were.
It feels like we were, and many have said it, but this simply isn’t true. Part of me feels like this too, that somehow the very fabric of who we are as a country was attacked last Friday afternoon. In the aftermath of this terrible event it really does feel like we were all attacked, and at some higher symbolic level I believe this is true.
But this is not about symbols or metaphors or any of that. It is about people who were injured, and people who were killed. And at that dreadfully real level, we were not all attacked. This was an attack against the Muslim community. If I had been standing outside those Mosques the person who did this would not have shot me. He would have walked past me. He had not come for me.
All of us were not attacked, only some of us were. And they have been the subject of attacks for years.
The outpouring of grief and genuine aroha for the victims and their families, and for the Muslim community as a whole is the only thing which helps many of us to feel anything other than horror. Our response as a country is truly the very best of us, it is the shining heart of who we aspire to be. We all grieve for these families. It is like an ache inside that, like all grief, compels us to a sense of action, a sense of wanting to do something… anything… to try and help those who were actually attacked.
It is truly heartwarming to see the thousands of flowers left at Mosques around the country, and all the people at vigils from grandmothers to gang members offering support and reassurance to Muslim families that this truly is their place. As Ruby Jones’ achingly simple and profoundly sad drawing says: “This is your home, and you should have been safe here.” That one sentence encapsulates everything that ever could be said about what has happened.
But the harder work lies ahead of us. There are bitter truths we must face as a country if we are to make real all the good sentiments of recent days. The questions people are asking of the intelligence services, about how did we not see this coming, and what we could and should have done earlier, are questions we also need to ask of ourselves.
You see the really uncomfortable truths here, are that the Muslim community, and many other communities as well, have long had to endure the hateful and hurtful barbs of racism and discrimination in New Zealand. Last year a Mosque in Hamilton was the target of an arson attack. That was an act of terror, but it was nothing new. Mosques have been the targets of vandalism and hatred in this country for years. And when you hear the stories from people in the Muslim community about their personal experiences of racism and hatred, it makes the heartache of this moment in our history that much harder to bear.
And you would get similar stories from the Chinese community, or the Indian community, or Pacific Island peoples, or Maori, or the many different peoples who make up our diverse nation.
In Auckland over this very weekend two young Muslim women were accosted and terrorised at a suburban Auckland train station by a man who physically intimidated them and told them to “go back to your own country”. There was only one other person there at the time, a young girl who was scared and upset by this event as well. Now, if some grownups had been there then I am absolutely certain someone would have stepped in to help those two young Muslim women. But if it was a week ago? Would I be so confident? No, sadly, I would not.
There has been a constant hum of ‘casual racism’ in play in New Zealand for a long time. We all hear it. And we might pull it up some of the time, but a lot of the time we don’t. It’s the stuff we overhear on the bus, at the supermarket, at work, with our friends, and at family gatherings. You know what I mean. I’ve heard it, you’ve heard it, we all hear it. We read it too. A lot of it. Online, in newspaper opinion pieces, we hear it on the radio, and on see it on television as well. This stuff has crept out of the shadows into public discourse.
And it emboldens hatred. It is the fertile ground in which the bigger evils grow, and it makes the people who are its targets feel unsafe, and afraid.
So if we really mean the things we have all been saying, that they are us, that we are them, that your sons and daughters are my sons and daughters, that you are my brother and my sister, that your family is my family, then we must ALL start to live the truth of those sentiments.
And that means if we’re on the bus or at the supermarket and we see someone being subjected to the ‘everyday’ racist stuff we’ve almost become accustomed to (“go back to your own country”, ‘bloody muslims”, “bloody asians”, “bloody maoris”, “bloody faggots”, ‘why don’t you people look where you’re going” etc etc etc) then we have to step in, and actually stand beside people. Not in spirit, but in reality. We have to say no, all the time, every time. We have to act the truth of the words because If I say that your family is my family, then I have to live those words even when it is uncomfortable and awkward and makes me afraid as well.
The bystander effect is very normal, and very human. We stand back because everyone else stands back. If no one else is stepping in, then we don’t step in. But that is not enough anymore. We cannot do that anymore. If your children really are my children, then I cannot stand quietly by feeling uncomfortable and not sure if it is my place to say something when your children are insulted or made to feel afraid.
They are our children, our sisters, our brothers. It is our place to speak up. It is your duty. It is mine.
This is the harder work we now must set ourselves to do.
NOTE: I have to get on a plane now so I can't moderate this discussion. Fair warning though... the suggestion of any Islamaphobic stuff gets you deleted and banned. I've banned two people already. Not in my house. Not on this post. Not gonna happen.


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  # 2200762 18-Mar-2019 13:13
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gulfa:

 

An article By Nigel Latta (worth reading)

 

[snip]

 

 

@gulfa - thanks for posting this, and an excellent read. Can you please post the URL of where you sourced this? Would like to pass it on. Thanks!


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  # 2200764 18-Mar-2019 13:13
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Yes it is worth reading and he is right. Its not much use when most of us think the right thoughts, unless we actually do something. These right thoughts might make us feel better and right, but in fact little changes in the real world if the good values we hold, only exist as values in our mind. Disagreeing with discrimination doesn't cut it anymore. It never actually did, but it seemed to be enough, as this is NZ, nothing much happens here.

 

Two related things to ponder

 

Batman posted this link   https://newmatilda.com/2019/03/16/tears-for-christchurch-australia-has-been-importing-hate-since-1788-now-were-in-the-export-business/     

 

 

 

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/crime/111329032/terrorism-security-expert-chris-kumeroa-says-new-zealanders-need-to-be-alert-to-potential-threats

 

 

 

 

 

 


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  # 2200767 18-Mar-2019 13:16
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The article was copied and pasted from a FaceBook page sorry I cant help more


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  # 2200801 18-Mar-2019 14:12
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BDFL - Memuneh
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  # 2200839 18-Mar-2019 14:53
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Be aware of scams, say CERT NZ:

 

 

CERT NZ has received reports of different opportunistic online scams and attacks in the wake of the tragic events in Christchurch last week.

 

These reports include:

 

online donation fraud; malware embedded in video files; defacement of NZ websites, and denial-of-service.

Scammers and attackers are using the tragic event as an opportunity to perform targeted online cyber attacks against New Zealanders.

 

In the reports we’ve received, the scams and attacks follow these formats:

 

  • phishing emails containing links to fake online banking logins. These emails also contain fraudulent bank accounts where victims can make donations for the Christchurch tragedy
  • sharing malicious video files on compromised websites or on social media. A video file containing footage related to the attack had malware embedded in it and this malicious file is being shared online
  • attackers changing New Zealand websites to spread political messages about the Christchurch tragedy
  • New Zealand websites receiving threats of denial-of-service attacks, which would take them offline.

There are official channels to donate money to the victims of these tragic events. CERT NZ recommends that anyone wishing to donate seek out official platforms and banks rather than using links in emails or on social media.

 

If you receive a phishing email or have found a website hosting political messages, report it to CERT NZ.

 

If your website has been taken over with political content relating to the tragic events in Christchurch, report it to CERT NZ.

 

We recommend you consent to share your report with our partner agencies (in this case, DIA and NZ Police).

 

Report an issue to CERT NZ

 

The Department of Internal Affairs considers the footage related to the attack as objectionable material, and therefore considered an offence to possess, share and/or host the harmful content.

 

If you are aware of online footage related to the attack report it to the Department of Internal Affairs.

 

Report to DIA's Censorship Unit External Link

 





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  # 2200852 18-Mar-2019 15:09
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I feel for the gunmans family. What a burden to live with.


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  # 2200868 18-Mar-2019 15:34
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networkn:

 

This, plus, honestly, if you think these people give a toss about how many people turn up for a memorial, then you are mistaken.

 

It's not like if 10,000 vs 100,000 turn up it would stop them doing it again.

 

Go, if you wish, to support those people who are affected, or to help with your own healing process.

 

 

 

 

I did go. I went not to help myself. I do not require help. I was not a victim of this horrendous attack, except in the general sense that we all are.

 

I went to demonstrate my support for those who are the real victims. It damn well does make a big difference to the Muslim community how many people turn up and I am glad to add myself to the count. 

 

I am also glad to report that the turnout was huge, possibly a record for our little backwater, that the fence of the Islamic community centre that I visited afterwards was completely covered in flowers and tributes on every surface available from the streets. There were hundreds of schoolchildren milling about, adding their names to the lists of supporters and reading the tributes of others. This kind of thing does matter. It is not the only thing, and it shouldn't be, but it helps to make a strong statement. 

 

And I do like to think that just possibly, a few weak-brained types feeling the pull of racist BS may notice the size of these demonstrations and feel vaguely uncomfortable about pitting themselves against so much condemnation. I think it does make a difference. Maybe not to hardened fascist types, but to those of limited intelligence who might be tempted by their vile ideas. 

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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