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Topic # 55307 29-Dec-2009 16:36
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Ok I know this isn't really home theatre but does anyone know if there is a correct height from the floor (to the bottom of the socket) for network/power points. I'm in the process of putting in structured network cabling and wiil be re-wiring the electricals in the next few months. The house is ~50 years old and the current power points conform to the British stanard which is 450 from floor which to my eye looks to be halfway up the wall! I'd like to put mine 200 from the floor. Is there a code for this in NZ?

Perhaps you could take a quick mesurement of your sockers from the floor and post it here?

Maybe we need a building/eclectrical forum for these sorts of questions?






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  Reply # 285859 29-Dec-2009 16:43
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I suggest you read the electrical regulations first before you begin.

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  Reply # 285865 29-Dec-2009 17:09
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My ower sockets are 300mm off the floor





 
 
 
 




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  Reply # 285931 29-Dec-2009 21:33
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sbiddle: I suggest you read the electrical regulations first before you begin.


Thanks for that. Looks like the only code requirement is for min 300 from the floor in wet areas. So yeah I guess 300 is best.




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  Reply # 285946 29-Dec-2009 22:26
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And put in horizontal ones. I have no idea why those abortion of vertical ones are so popular in NZ, hardly ever see them in AU.




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  Reply # 285949 29-Dec-2009 22:35
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300mm is a common hight in NZ, horizontal is becoming more popular in NZ





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  Reply # 285952 29-Dec-2009 22:38
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richms: And put in horizontal ones. I have no idea why those abortion of vertical ones are so popular in NZ, hardly ever see them in AU.


Aesthetics. It's so they look the same as the light switches. It's something many people building new houses are exceptionally picky about - just ask any sparky!

Verticals are a pain if you're running plug packs since most are too big. People seem to overlook practical reasons purely so things look nice!


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  Reply # 285954 29-Dec-2009 22:40
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I was puttign all the ones in using the gib knife as a measure to the screw in the box. Not keen on direct fixing to gib after seeing a tripped over network cable on one at a friends place. Who would have thought that cat-5 was stronger then NZ crappy gib building...




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  Reply # 285955 29-Dec-2009 22:43
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sbiddle:
richms: And put in horizontal ones. I have no idea why those abortion of vertical ones are so popular in NZ, hardly ever see them in AU.


Aesthetics. It's so they look the same as the light switches. It's something many people building new houses are exceptionally picky about - just ask any sparky!

Verticals are a pain if you're running plug packs since most are too big. People seem to overlook practical reasons purely so things look nice!



last I checked you didnt have lightswitches at a foot off the floor.

and they have horizontal light switces over there in most of the places I had been.

People building new houses should learn to be picky about important things, like not building them out of sticks and cardboard and plastering them to look like something they are not.




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  Reply # 285963 29-Dec-2009 23:13
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richms: I was puttign all the ones in using the gib knife as a measure to the screw in the box. Not keen on direct fixing to gib after seeing a tripped over network cable on one at a friends place. Who would have thought that cat-5 was stronger then NZ crappy gib building...


Faceplates should never be screwed directly to jib with no mounting block behind. If you don't have an existing metal or plastic mounting block attached to a stud already then you should use one of the numerous plastic or metal blocks designed to fit securely to the jib.

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  Reply # 285968 29-Dec-2009 23:46
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That is an acceptable mounting method when I last checked. Even with a clip behind it, you will still rip the plate thru the gib when someone trips over an attached cable like an F or cat-5.

The only gotcha was with mains stuff if there was anything else in that cavity you needed to use a box, same as if the back of the wall was unfinished - had to use a box not a clip. Low voltage had none of those restrictions.




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  Reply # 285982 30-Dec-2009 00:49
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Yeah the current sockets are 450 high, single vertical. Hideous!
I'll be putting in horizontal power and network. I'll be using flush boxes; network on one side of the stud and power on the other.




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