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510 posts

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#76819 7-Feb-2011 14:17
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Just going through the process of building a home and am after some tips on cabling it for sky / computer etc

In a way its similar to this thread http://www.geekzone.co.nz/forums.asp?forumid=34&topicid=18081 but a little out of date?

Anyway - I see a lot of people put in in a data system and wonder what use it is if any to me. eg - Golden Homes Clipsal system. My understanding is that its basically a router box for main connection  tv/ph/network. Is that the simple explanation?

What will it actually do for me or how can I make it work better for me? At a simple level,  I dont really see the point yet :)

Im assuming that I will need TV and network in 4 rooms. Is there any other cabling that you suggest?

 Cheers!

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  #436311 7-Feb-2011 14:21
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The TCF has premises wiring guidelines, specifically look for the paragraph that says:

"A two page information handout on minimum cable installation is also available for installers and homeowners"
 
http://www.tcf.org.nz/premwiring

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  #436318 7-Feb-2011 14:46
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Ragnor: The TCF has premises wiring guidelines, specifically look for the paragraph that says:

"A two page information handout on minimum cable installation is also available for installers and homeowners"
 
http://www.tcf.org.nz/premwiring


This is probably the best tool to use and work with your electrician towards achieving. It gives you a lot of flexibility in terms of if you want to do things later on with Sky and the data networking will be useful for now and essential with fibre broadband rollout. It may cost a little more now but the investment is well worth it.

The only other suggest I could make is that you should get a coax lead from the distribution box in the garage go up to the roof where you want the sky dish and this should be done during the home installation. Rememebr anything that needs to be retrofitted will be either expensive/complicated (e.g. need to pull GIB off to run in walls etc.) or ugly (cable running down outside wall). 




Speedtest 2019-10-14


 
 
 
 


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  #436321 7-Feb-2011 14:53
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Zeon: The only other suggest I could make is that you should get a coax lead from the distribution box in the garage go up to the roof where you want the sky dish and this should be done during the home installation. Rememebr anything that needs to be retrofitted will be either expensive/complicated (e.g. need to pull GIB off to run in walls etc.) or ugly (cable running down outside wall). 
+1
Actually run a few too, to cover sat dish installs (SKY now doing multiple feeds to LNBs) and to aerial locations on the roof too for terrestrial freeview HD reception.

Within reason, if you think you may need it then do it.  It costs only the cable cost at this stage, but once lined the install costs add a lot more to what would have been a simple job.

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  #436362 7-Feb-2011 16:35
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Been there recently myself. No easy answer. Best single piece of advice I can give is drill a 30mm hole in all your dwangs and top plates where ever you think you might want to run wires. Run a string down the holes to use as a pull-string later on if you need it.

The hole needs to be big enough to pull your largest plug through. An HDMI cable  might be the biggest at the moment.

You'll need holes in each room for
- network cable to hard wire connect things to your PC where wireless wont do the job.
- Run stereo speaker wire to connect your AV Receiver and send to various speakers inside/outside th house
- Cat5 /6 for your phone broadband, security and whatever  
- aerial cable for your TV / Sky
- power points ( i reckon at least one on the wall per room.

To get clever you could also drill holes  in the studs above where your skirting boards will be so you can draw wire horizontally if need be )like if you have a power socket in one room on the left you can put another on in the room backing it a bit further along the wall) 

Wire as far as your budget will allow - but you'll find if you want to wire and terminate every room its going to bet quite expensive. The wire itself is relatively cheap and best to do as much as you can now rather than retro fit. - even of you leave the wire in the wall for later uses (don't forget to take a photo before teh gib goes up) and mark your plans)

Spend some time looking at your plans and asking people who have been throughout same process where they would lay wires. 

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  #436363 7-Feb-2011 16:35
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Running some reasonable diameter conduit from your ceiling space down the walls to what you believe will be your primary media locations with a draw-wire in them may also allow some futureproofing. I did that, but unfortunately it was in the days of CRT TVs so the majority of them are in the corners of rooms!

Edit: the post above came in while I was composing.  Holes work fine, conduit just prevents hang-ups.




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  #436382 7-Feb-2011 17:00
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Thanks for the info - all good stuff. I think at the minimum, its a case of running wires for audio / network even if not terminated. It makes sense not to pay for jacks that are easily added later.

Any recommendations on the actual 'box' like the clipsal system? To me the standard seems a little small with no room for router. Is there a better option? although I dont want / need to pay the earth for one

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  #436426 7-Feb-2011 18:05
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minimoke: ...Best single piece of advice I can give is drill a 30mm hole in all your dwangs and top plates where ever you think you might want to run wires. Run a string down the holes to use as a pull-string later on if you need it....


+1

Go overkill on this, what will take a few extra hours now (+ the cost of some draw wires) will save tuns of time and money in the future, if not for you, for the next x number of owners of the house. Man I wish the people who built my house in 1956 had the foresight to do this!




 
 
 
 


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  #436684 8-Feb-2011 09:39
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Quick check based on the comments above....

How much of a dwang/stud can you bore out before it no longer performs it's actual task.  ie before you diminish it's structural integrity/purpose.   I'm picking you can bore out say 1/3 of it's width or so but no more.

Is there separate cable for phone lines around the house or are people using Cat5or6 for this purpose now? 

I'm talking for a house without structured cabling in place initially.
ie is it worth/possible to use Cat cabling for adding in additional jacks?
or for rewiring the phone lines inside a house where you are sorting out 3 wire to 2 wire conversions etc

Cheers.

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  #436730 8-Feb-2011 11:18
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Personally if you're unsure I'd WIRE based on a structured wiring solution for data/voice/video (ie Cat5e and RG6 coax) but not terminate them and just leave uncutout flush boxes in the appropriate locations.

Cat5e costs about $120 for a 305m box and RG6 isn't all that expensive either. It's the terminations/plates that cost money.

I'm in the process of upgrading my place to a structured solution and while I do have sub floor access it's be a whole lot nicer to not have to crawl around under the house and drill up into plates.

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  #436779 8-Feb-2011 12:47
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SpookyAwol: 
Any recommendations on the actual 'box' like the clipsal system? To me the standard seems a little small with no room for router. Is there a better option? although I dont want / need to pay the earth for one


Find a J A Russell store (Radcliffes etc) and get a Hubbell panel - large and cheap enough

Just get the empty panel for now - Buy patch panels etc later

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