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kingdragonfly
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  #2888933 20-Mar-2022 11:44
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Note, this is a parody video, "Australien"

Honest Government Ad | The Floods 🌊

thejuicemedia

The Australien Government has made an ad about this summer’s floods and it’s surprisingly honest and informative.


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Geektastic
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  #2888951 20-Mar-2022 13:01
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We are moving to the South island. We usually go there several times a year and so moving there will remove a number of flights and ferry crossings per annum as I can't see the North Island having the draw for us that the South does.






Geektastic
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  #2910381 5-May-2022 07:37
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I read this today in the Herald:

“Climate scientists Tim Naish and Richard Levy published research showing that sea levels could rise faster and higher in New Zealand than in other countries.”

Genuine question: How does the sea level rise more in one place only? Ignoring tides, which aren’t mentioned, I thought water found equilibrium in level? If that is so, I can’t really see how it could be higher in one place other than momentarily.







tdgeek
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  #2910384 5-May-2022 07:54
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Geektastic: I read this today in the Herald:

“Climate scientists Tim Naish and Richard Levy published research showing that sea levels could rise faster and higher in New Zealand than in other countries.”

Genuine question: How does the sea level rise more in one place only? Ignoring tides, which aren’t mentioned, I thought water found equilibrium in level? If that is so, I can’t really see how it could be higher in one place other than momentarily.

 

Perhaps with the same rise, a level area will flood further than a steep area? Same rise but more square miles flooded

 

Tides in a narrow area will rush in faster than a wide area?

 

Iceland and Greenland have decreasing sea level rise, as the melting of the ice sheets reduces weight on the land so the land is rising there, in fact a couple of fishing ports its getting almost too shallow to get boats in.


Gurezaemon
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  #2910397 5-May-2022 08:47
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Geektastic: I read this today in the Herald:

“Climate scientists Tim Naish and Richard Levy published research showing that sea levels could rise faster and higher in New Zealand than in other countries.”

Genuine question: How does the sea level rise more in one place only? Ignoring tides, which aren’t mentioned, I thought water found equilibrium in level? If that is so, I can’t really see how it could be higher in one place other than momentarily.

 

The general gist of this forecast is that the ongoing worldwide rises in sea level are being compounded with tectonic movements that mean significant parts of NZ are already dropping a couple of millimeters a year.





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elpenguino
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  #2910398 5-May-2022 08:48
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This was on telly .
Parts of NZ are subsiding so you can add that subsidence to sea level rise for extra flooding risk.

Iirc some parts are subsiding at 4mm per year, Auckland Wellington and Christchurch are among the fastest places going under.




Most of the posters in this thread are just like chimpanzees on MDMA, full of feelings of bonhomie, joy, and optimism. Fred99 8/4/21


Geektastic
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  #2910405 5-May-2022 09:16
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So the sea level isn’t in fact rising more in NZ than elsewhere? It’s the same.

The apparent level is rising more due to land sinking. And part of that rise has nothing to do with climate change at all.

Glad that’s cleared up. I was doing mental gymnastics trying to work out how water could rise more. I’ve seen the same thing suggested for the U.K. and found it strange that it wasn’t mentioned for France which is all of 20 miles away!







tdgeek
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  #2910407 5-May-2022 09:21
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Geektastic: So the sea level isn’t in fact rising more in NZ than elsewhere? It’s the same.

The apparent level is rising more due to land sinking. And part of that rise has nothing to do with climate change at all.

Glad that’s cleared up. I was doing mental gymnastics trying to work out how water could rise more. I’ve seen the same thing suggested for the U.K. and found it strange that it wasn’t mentioned for France which is all of 20 miles away!

 

Sort of.  Melting ice raises sea levels, and when water is warmer it has more volume so thats a bonus rise. Land sinking is added to that also land rising is helpful


MikeAqua
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  #2910424 5-May-2022 09:52
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Geektastic: I read this today in the Herald:

“Climate scientists Tim Naish and Richard Levy published research showing that sea levels could rise faster and higher in New Zealand than in other countries.”

Genuine question: How does the sea level rise more in one place only? Ignoring tides, which aren’t mentioned, I thought water found equilibrium in level? If that is so, I can’t really see how it could be higher in one place other than momentarily.

 

In some places, local sea level rise will occur as the land sinks.

 

More generally, sea level is not flat around the world.  Currents, differences in salinity and temperature, effects of topography and the effects of the earth's gravity - where the earth has large trenches or ridges gravity isn't perpendicular to the earths spherical circumference.  Also because the earth is rotation, the ocean isn't spherical in shape.  Even wind patterns can have an effect.

 

As an example if a cold salty deep water current flows under warmer less saline surface water, it will push the surface water up.  It's a bit like pushing your hand under a carpet.  Some currents have the opposite effect and draw sea levels down locally.  I'd give some specific oceanic examples but it's been mumble-mumble decades since I studied this. 

 

If you've ever been to French pass when the tide is running, then you might have noticed that the water is visibly higher on the upstream side.  That's an extreme small scale example.  But the same effects occur at lower speeds over wider areas, where the collective force of all that moving water is substantial.





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elpenguino
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  #2910436 5-May-2022 10:15
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Geektastic: So the sea level isn’t in fact rising more in NZ than elsewhere? It’s the same.

The apparent level is rising more due to land sinking. And part of that rise has nothing to do with climate change at all.

 

Doesn't matter what's causing it when the tide washes in under the door. A lot of people don't realise their land is going to become seafront property sooner rather than later.

 

Amazingly most don't seem to have considered they may not be able to insure their property in the future.

 

https://www.stuff.co.nz/environment/climate-news/300471629/a-shore-thing-nz-housing-market-unfazed-by-sea-rise-but-reserve-bank-preps-for-change

 

Don't expect me to pay for the sea walls.





Most of the posters in this thread are just like chimpanzees on MDMA, full of feelings of bonhomie, joy, and optimism. Fred99 8/4/21


1101
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  #2910456 5-May-2022 11:04
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elpenguino:

 

A lot of people don't realise their land is going to become seafront property sooner rather than later.

 

 

Scaremongering.

 

Sure , if your house is ON THE BEACH , then  you may have an issue .

 

4mm per year , as quoted from above.
That hardly worth noting. And its only a prediction . Plenty of previous claims/predictions turned out to be BS .
What happened to all the Small Pacific Islands that were supposed to be completely underwater by now ?

 

There has ALLWAYS been a risk for beachfront properties
Just as local properties (east coat Bays) on cliff tops have a real risk from erosion .
Just as those next to rivers have allways been at risk from flooding

 

Some ancient cities are now under water . And have been for thousands of years
Its hardly a new thing .

 

 

 

 

 

 


MikeAqua
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  #2910576 5-May-2022 14:05
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1101:

 

Just as local properties (east coat Bays) on cliff tops have a real risk from erosion

 

 

I've always been puzzled by people who buy cliff top property.  Do they not know cliffs are the product of erosion, lol.





Mike


  #2910589 5-May-2022 14:37
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Geektastic: I read this today in the Herald:

“Climate scientists Tim Naish and Richard Levy published research showing that sea levels could rise faster and higher in New Zealand than in other countries.”

Genuine question: How does the sea level rise more in one place only? Ignoring tides, which aren’t mentioned, I thought water found equilibrium in level? If that is so, I can’t really see how it could be higher in one place other than momentarily.

 

because the land (tctonic plates) are sinking

 

the sea level in relation to stuff on the shore is rising faster because of the 2 combined


frankv
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  #2911114 6-May-2022 17:29
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1101:

 

And its only a prediction . Plenty of previous claims/predictions turned out to be BS .

 

 

Where "plenty" is a small fraction of the number that have turned out to be true.

 


What happened to all the Small Pacific Islands that were supposed to be completely underwater by now ?

 

 

I don't think any were predicted to disappear entirely by now. But there's plenty getting flooded so often as to be practically uninhabitable.

 

 


frankv
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  #2911116 6-May-2022 17:31
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Geektastic: I read this today in the Herald:

“Climate scientists Tim Naish and Richard Levy published research showing that sea levels could rise faster and higher in New Zealand than in other countries.”

Genuine question: How does the sea level rise more in one place only? Ignoring tides, which aren’t mentioned, I thought water found equilibrium in level? If that is so, I can’t really see how it could be higher in one place other than momentarily.

 

What Mike said. But also storm surges can raise sea levels locally by metres. Global warming means more storms IIRC which means more storm surges.

 

 


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