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itxtme
2068 posts

Uber Geek


  #321525 22-Apr-2010 07:10
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patatrat:
MikeyPI: 
Do you begrudge the supermaket for making a profit off food? Thats a little more important than "concert tickets" 


Getting a bit off topic now.

But.... ticket scalpers are not like supermakerts. They are like a guy at the supermaket in line in front of you. This guy buys every single item of product XYZ (which you were after too). He then waits outside and offers to sell it to you at a higher price than what he brought it for.


 


 

So you mean ticket scalpers are actually like dairies?  - I wonder if the RWC legislation deals with them too??

 
 
 

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keewee01
1733 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #321553 22-Apr-2010 08:18
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itxtme:
patatrat:
MikeyPI: 
Do you begrudge the supermaket for making a profit off food? Thats a little more important than "concert tickets" 


Getting a bit off topic now.

But.... ticket scalpers are not like supermakerts. They are like a guy at the supermaket in line in front of you. This guy buys every single item of product XYZ (which you were after too). He then waits outside and offers to sell it to you at a higher price than what he brought it for.


 


 

So you mean ticket scalpers are actually like dairies?  - I wonder if the RWC legislation deals with them too??


ROTFLMAO

patatrat
261 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #321563 22-Apr-2010 08:51
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itxtme: 
So you mean ticket scalpers are actually like dairies?  - I wonder if the RWC legislation deals with them too??


I can see how you jump to that conclusion, but dairies generally don't buy all stock available leaving none for any other consumers (as opposed to the simile I offered, where the person purchases all available stock).

Ticket scalpers only make money when demand is greater than supply. Invariably, they will lose money (or not make any) on tickets that don't sellout, as consumers will still be able to purchase the tickets at the set price. Once tickets are sold out for a gig, ticket scalpers have a sort of monopoly on the sale of those tickets, as they can not be purchased by the ticketing agency anymore. Once they have a monopoly, they can set their own price. 

Dairies are like ticket scalpers that only purchase non sold out shows. The 12 cokes that they purchase doesn't use up all supply, as there will be crates of coke left in the supermarket warehouse and more on a truck that will arrive in an hour or so. Dairies only make money through convenience - consumers pay more for the fact that the dairy is closer than the supermarket, or open longer. Supermarkets often put restrictions to prevent dairy owners from using up all of the supply and becoming more like ticket scalpers, by limiting the special price of 2.5L cokes to 12 units per person. 

So supply and demand is the key here. RWC legislation is attempting to distribute supply across demand to prevent resale.

As an interesting side note, the Queensland festival 'Splendor in the Grass' has a ticketing scheme where you are required to provide your name and date of birth at time of purchase. Tickets are not transferable (but can be refunded if you can't go minus a fee) and ID is required at the gates. Anyone with tickets that don't match ID will be turned away with no refund. Tickets that are refunded go back into the sale pool. There is obviously increased costs with this scheme (ID checking and matching at the gate is just one), but if the event is age restricted, this action is generally required anyway.

Getting back on track, ticket scalping or running a dairy is nothing like selling counterfeit goods. For there to be any similarity, ticket scalpers would need to be selling fake tickets and dairies would need to be selling fake coca-cola. Or, iGeneration would need to be purchasing all Sennheisers that come into the country to effectively have a monopoly on the sale of them, which would allow them to set their price.



Dezroy

34 posts

Geek


  #321680 22-Apr-2010 14:05
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RESULT!

Just received this email earlier today (good thing too as I was about to contact the bank about that chargeback).

"I have spoken to my Boss and our supplier.  We have agreed to refund you.  No need to return earphones. Our supplier is recalling the earphones from us so all is good."

So it would appear (or is that it's been made to appear?) that it was a loose cannon in their customer services team.

I can confirm that I have now received the full refund.

Success! 

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