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762 posts

Ultimate Geek
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Topic # 65785 6-Aug-2010 12:33 Send private message

Should faulty goods sent by courier from a Computer parts supplier that are Dead on Arrival (DOA) be returned at the customer's expense or the supplier's?

I can understand if the goods develop a fault after purchase that the customer must return them at their expense and the supplier will replace or repair and return them to the customer at the supplier's expense.

Is the process different if the customer is an individual compared to a company?

If the goods have a manufacturing fault, DOA when they arrive should it still be the customer's cost to return them for replacement or should the supplier cover the return cost and replace or repair since they should not have sent faulty goods in the first place?

The supplier has imported the goods from China and sold to the customer in sealed packaging so it is hard for them to test them first.


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128 posts

Master Geek


  Reply # 364205 6-Aug-2010 13:05 Send private message

Who pays for the DOA return costs if the goods are purchased from a physical store?

Admittedly the cost of returning something to a store is typically small (car mileage + your time) but it seems unfair on principle to expect a different level of service from an online supplier 

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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 364210 6-Aug-2010 13:10 Send private message

The manufacturer in an ideal world.

The store you bought it from pays for it then they get it back from the manufacturer.

Lack of QA = DOA. The manufacturer should have to pay for this.




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1163 posts

Uber Geek


  Reply # 364214 6-Aug-2010 13:12

geek4me: Should faulty goods sent by courier from a Computer parts supplier that are Dead on Arrival (DOA) be returned at the customer's expense or the supplier's?

I can understand if the goods develop a fault after purchase that the customer must return them at their expense and the supplier will replace or repair and return them to the customer at the supplier's expense.

Is the process different if the customer is an individual compared to a company?

If the goods have a manufacturing fault, DOA when they arrive should it still be the customer's cost to return them for replacement or should the supplier cover the return cost and replace or repair since they should not have sent faulty goods in the first place?

The supplier has imported the goods from China and sold to the customer in sealed packaging so it is hard for them to test them first.



A good retailer would arrange for them to be returned at their cost, and I have never had any issue with this when I have purchased something DOA. This is also what is required under the CGA.



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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 364223 6-Aug-2010 13:24 Send private message

The CGA does not apply to businesses I believe.

Returning goods to a store is usually okay I agree. However Goods couriered from Dunedin to Wellington for example is not cheap to return.

I wonder if a manufacturer in China has ever paid a supplier freight for DOA goods returned by customers?

67 posts

Master Geek


  Reply # 364226 6-Aug-2010 13:26 Send private message

geek4me: Should faulty goods sent by courier from a Computer parts supplier that are Dead on Arrival (DOA) be returned at the customer's expense or the supplier's?

They are required under the Consumer Guarantees Act to pay for your shipping whether it be a prepaid bag or refunding you the amount it cost.

I can understand if the goods develop a fault after purchase that the customer must return them at their expense and the supplier will replace or repair and return them to the customer at the supplier's expense.

If the goods are faulty, the above still applies - the retailer is liable for shipping.

Is the process different if the customer is an individual compared to a company?

Yes it is different as the Consumer's Guarantees Act does not apply to a company (What applies? I don't know)

If the goods have a manufacturing fault, DOA when they arrive should it still be the customer's cost to return them for replacement or should the supplier cover the return cost and replace or repair since they should not have sent faulty goods in the first place?

The supplier has imported the goods from China and sold to the customer in sealed packaging so it is hard for them to test them first.

This is irrelevant.  The contract is between you and the retailers - not the retailer's supplier or the manufacturer.  Additionally, they cannot make you send it directly back to the manufacturer - they have to deal with the issue themselves.

The Consumer magazine does a good job of explaining your rights: http://www.consumer.org.nz/reports/consumer-guarantees-act/putting-it-right



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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 364228 6-Aug-2010 13:31 Send private message

On this occasion I am a business purchaser so CGA does not apply :-(

Not sure what Act does.

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  Reply # 364231 6-Aug-2010 13:38 Send private message

geek4me: On this occasion I am a business purchaser so CGA does not apply :-(

Not sure what Act does.


Probably fair trading act but that's just a guess.  Your first stop is going to be the retailers terms and conditions.  I'm sure you can impress on them that it's not good enough for the item to be DOA and they really should cover the return costs.



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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 364240 6-Aug-2010 13:55 Send private message

Have told the supplier that DOA goods return costs should be covered by them. If they don't we won't buy from them again. Other suppliers have paid return freight in the past for DOA goods so we still buy from them. It's up to this supplier if it wants us as a customer in future.

Still it's good to know what our rights are.


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  Reply # 364296 6-Aug-2010 15:19 Send private message

It's usual for the purchaser to pay for the return leg when good arrive and are dead. 

Interesting facet of the law: You are supposed to determine the goods are functional and acceptable BEFORE you sign to accept delivery. So if you make the courier guy stand there and wait while you test the goods....and find them broken.......you then refuse to sign and the goods go back at no charge to yourself.

The law is an A>S>S though as there isn't a courier in NZ who will let you open a package you haven't yet signed for.....so Catch-22.  

 




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