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19 posts

Geek


  # 2156807 9-Jan-2019 09:55
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BarTender:

 

 

 

I think that premise that Mobile Broadband can offer a true Unlimited plan is incredibly naive.

 

 

 

 

There is also a similar augment that offering a 120 GB plan on a Conklin is naive too.


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  # 2156808 9-Jan-2019 09:57
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tim0001:

 

BarTender:

 

 

 

I think that premise that Mobile Broadband can offer a true Unlimited plan is incredibly naive.

 

 

 

 

There is also a similar augment that offering a 120 GB plan on a Conklin is naive too.

 

 

Moving to a rural area and expecting to get high density urban services is probably the most naive.


 
 
 
 


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  # 2156821 9-Jan-2019 10:11
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I am on 4G wireless RBI and when it works well it is wonderful, but when it doesn't I want to tear my hair out. We depend on a single mast, the only one in range, and we are about 20 km from it. Much of the time we get around 25-30 Mbps down and that is perfect. At times (in the distant past, admittedly) it has gone has high as 50 Mbps. 

 

Other than normal browsing and our phone, we mainly use our connection for streaming. Our requirements are relatively modest. We don't have 4K and our connection wouldn't be up to it even if we did. Most of what we stream is SD or 720p. At most it is 1080p. We never exceed our monthly data cap of 120 GB. 

 

The frustration is that the tower we depend on appears to be oversubscribed and this has been going on for years. During school holidays and especially the Christmas period, our speeds go to hell and we can't reliably stream anything. We don't lose the ability to browse so technically we still have 'broadband' Internet, but any kind of video streaming becomes impossible. This used to mainly happen at peak viewing times in the evening (when it is most frustrating, of course) but now that seems to be getting worse and often our speeds are crap even at 11 pm, as they were last night. Even this morning I couldn't get more than 7 Mbps on a speed test, and while that should be sufficient in theory, for us it usually is not. Our speeds also seem to jump around a lot. 

 

I don't expect fibre performance at my semi-rural location. I don't demand uncapped data. I don't want 4K. But it would be nice if we just had consistent minimal service that would enable us to watch television in the evenings.

 

Several years ago I watched as the fibre backbone connecting Auckland and Wellington was buried not far away. It is 3.68 kms from our driveway. Not that we will ever be able to make use of it.

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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  # 2156857 9-Jan-2019 10:19
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You should raise this with the ISP @Rikkitic


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  # 2156858 9-Jan-2019 10:22
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Perhaps we need a special “Netflix tax” to fund rural broadband capacity expansion ;)

 

Before internet TV the Conklins worked really well for many people. (Probably a Microsoft tax too because of the win 10 updates)


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  # 2156889 9-Jan-2019 11:01
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Coil:

 

You should raise this with the ISP @Rikkitic

 

 

I have. They have done their best but the bottleneck is with VF, who provide the signal. I can't go anywhere else so am stuck with them.

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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  # 2156997 9-Jan-2019 13:23
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Rikkitic:

 

Coil:

 

You should raise this with the ISP @Rikkitic

 

 

I have. They have done their best but the bottleneck is with VF, who provide the signal. I can't go anywhere else so am stuck with them.

 

 

 

 

Been a common problem in a number of holiday areas this summer,

 

I want to say it is getting worse but it really is case by case, compare to the total disaster Vodafone had one year on the Coromandel where you could not even txt or call in the 2000's things are not that bad but I saw a lot of complaints from holiday sports about slow mobile broadband speed but it was still working. The Coromandel has a good number of cell sites as well.


 
 
 
 


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  # 2157003 9-Jan-2019 13:26
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BarTender:

 

I think that premise that Mobile Broadband can offer a true Unlimited plan is incredibly naive. Unlimited Fixed Broadband is exactly that, unlimited without any "we will limit your speed after x GB". Whereas unlimited mobile is always "we will rate limit you after a certain data limit is hit".  Radio spectrum is a finite resource and you can't magic up more capacity without building more towers.

 

There are people (thankfully a small number but it is double digits of people) who are literally moving 40+ Terabytes of data per month across their broadband connection and if that were to happen on Mobile the site would be unusable especially if everyone does it during peak time.

 

Caps and limits on the number of Mobile Broadband connections per cellsite or region are in place for a very good reason.

 

I could see in the future "off-peak" options where data could be uncapped or have a larger off peak cap from midnight - 6am. Or an option similar tot he current "unlimited" plans offered for mobile devices only where you get rate limited to a very slow speed after you exceed your soft limit rather than being charged overage. The issue there is billing can be problematic with time of day as if you have a long running TCP session (like what you get when you download a large file) I have seen different billing platforms behave differently and only accure the data once the TCP session closes rather than reporting it every 5/10/15 mins or whatever.

 

 

I don't disagree to a point, but the problem is the rate limiting starts after a truly pathetic cap. Latest numbers I can see from Chorus was that the average fixed connection was using 200gb/month in the year to April 2018, which had slightly more than doubled from the previous year.. They were forecasting usage of 680gb/month average by 2020, so it's not unreasonable to surmise that the current average is going to be somewhere around 400gb/month now. Yet the unlimited wireless plans rate limit after what, 22gb? If the rate limiting kicked in after a few hundred gb, I think it would be much more palatable.





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  # 2157004 9-Jan-2019 13:27
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atomeara:

 

Rikkitic:

 

Coil:

 

You should raise this with the ISP @Rikkitic

 

 

I have. They have done their best but the bottleneck is with VF, who provide the signal. I can't go anywhere else so am stuck with them.

 

 

 

 

Been a common problem in a number of holiday areas this summer,

 

I want to say it is getting worse but it really is case by case, compare to the total disaster Vodafone had one year on the Coromandel where you could not even txt or call in the 2000's things are not that bad but I saw a lot of complaints from holiday sports about slow mobile broadband speed but it was still working. The Coromandel has a good number of cell sites as well.

 

 

 

 

Vodafone deployed COW's or Cells on Wheels at Northern Bass this year that I went and ALL Data/SMS/Voice service were unusable. Calls would not connect, texts would not send, nothing would be received. There were patches where it would work but then nothing for an hour. On the 31st (last night) it some how was fixed.
Has anyone ever tried to do a side by side new years text at 12:00? Generally takes a minute or two for the text to come through!



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Ultimate Geek


  # 2157005 9-Jan-2019 13:27
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tim0001:

 

RedactedRetracted: I noticed a few people talking about upgrades to cabinets, is there a website where you can see when/if your local cabinet is being updated, currently my local one doesn't have *DSL capability, I'm personally happy with my fixed line wireless (only 6 up, but more than sufficient for several HD video streams) (and wireless is 100% the way to go for rural users outside of townships), but having more options than just sat may give me a bit more leverage with my small ISP for getting a higher data cap ;), which imo is far more of an issue for most rural users, vs getting 20 mbit+ connections

 

 

 

https://sp.chorus.co.nz/report/broadband-coverage

 

 

 

 

Generally speaking they have most been upgrading existing broadband cabinets, the current project is only focused on that.

 

 

 

However under "LMSIP project" (no idea what this actually is, I assume it maybe related to the Spark PSTN shutdown) they did replace a small number of POTS/Voice only with new Broadband/Baseband IP cabinets. They were random places like north of Taumarunui and a few spots on the East Cape.

 

They also did a number on the inland highway link after the Kaikoura earthquake, I think about 8 got added.


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Ultimate Geek


  # 2157009 9-Jan-2019 13:35
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BarTender:

 

tim0001:

 

Thinking of the situations where hills and distance make eDMR and/or fibre very expensive to provide fast DSL backhaul (ie the DSL backhaul presumably stays on copper?). Is Chorus prevented from decommissioning their DSL even if RCG provides a service that is say 10 times faster? I can almost feel Chorus’s pain.

 

 

eDMR provides plenty fast enough backhaul at 1gbps rates for DSL backhauls. The issue with eDMR is now the hard ones where the terrain would require multiple hops rather than 2 point to point, getting power there may be incredibly expensive as I don't think they have sorted out a cost effective solution to power the the Ericsson gear on a solar + battery with generator backup combo or a land owner(s) demands some crazy amount of money to put it on there and annual lease.

 

The problem with Telecom and now Spark and Chorus is they *always* over-engineer everything with the thought that this could be carrying a 111 call and someones life could depend on it working.

 

 

Some eDMR is oversubscribed.

 

They do have some solar only sites but I think you summed it up well, there expensive as hell, over-engineer.

 

They want either want long term leases or easements on the land, they only use licensed eDMR links.

 

I think this is why a lot of sites are getting fibre because the on going costs are a lot cheaper.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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  # 2157023 9-Jan-2019 13:52
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atomeara:

 

Generally speaking they have most been upgrading existing broadband cabinets, the current project is only focused on that.

 

 

 

However under "LMSIP project" (no idea what this actually is, I assume it maybe related to the Spark PSTN shutdown) they did replace a small number of POTS/Voice only with new Broadband/Baseband IP cabinets. They were random places like north of Taumarunui and a few spots on the East Cape.

 

They also did a number on the inland highway link after the Kaikoura earthquake, I think about 8 got added.

 

 

LMSIP is often also called BBIP1

 

BBIP2 being the voice served by baseband which is the full PSTN replacement.

 

 

 

LMSIP works fine, but it has it's drawbacks.

 

Linecard failures or resets required being the largest issue there.

 

 

 

For the spark side, LMSIP wasn't really testable until recently. so that was another drawback.





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Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.


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  # 2157049 9-Jan-2019 14:16
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hio77:

 

atomeara:

 

Generally speaking they have most been upgrading existing broadband cabinets, the current project is only focused on that.

 

 

 

However under "LMSIP project" (no idea what this actually is, I assume it maybe related to the Spark PSTN shutdown) they did replace a small number of POTS/Voice only with new Broadband/Baseband IP cabinets. They were random places like north of Taumarunui and a few spots on the East Cape.

 

They also did a number on the inland highway link after the Kaikoura earthquake, I think about 8 got added.

 

 

LMSIP is often also called BBIP1

 

BBIP2 being the voice served by baseband which is the full PSTN replacement.

 

 

 

LMSIP works fine, but it has it's drawbacks.

 

Linecard failures or resets required being the largest issue there.

 

 

 

For the spark side, LMSIP wasn't really testable until recently. so that was another drawback.

 

 

 

 

Can you explain that a bit more BBIP1 vs BBIP2?

 

 

 

I assumed BBIP was just a ATA/FXS type card offering traditional dial tone to the end customer in each ISAM and from the ISAM it is SIP to Chorus and onto the ISP


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  # 2157050 9-Jan-2019 14:18
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Lias: I don't disagree to a point, but the problem is the rate limiting starts after a truly pathetic cap. Latest numbers I can see from Chorus was that the average fixed connection was using 200gb/month in the year to April 2018, which had slightly more than doubled from the previous year.. They were forecasting usage of 680gb/month average by 2020, so it's not unreasonable to surmise that the current average is going to be somewhere around 400gb/month now. Yet the unlimited wireless plans rate limit after what, 22gb? If the rate limiting kicked in after a few hundred gb, I think it would be much more palatable.

 

The main issue is mobile simply couldn't cope if you had even 10-20% of the subscriber base pull down that amount of data on a monthly basis.

 

Off peak sure, but all networks are built for usage at peak which on Fixed is 8-9pm on a Sunday night.

 

atomeara: However under "LMSIP project" (no idea what this actually is, I assume it maybe related to the Spark PSTN shutdown) they did replace a small number of POTS/Voice only with new Broadband/Baseband IP cabinets. They were random places like north of Taumarunui and a few spots on the East Cape.

 

They also did a number on the inland highway link after the Kaikoura earthquake, I think about 8 got added.

 

 

LMSIP is a project I was involved with and it installs specially built line cards into the NEAX PBX to make the NEAX talk SIP on a whole slot.

 

What was done is where a copper bundle from the DSLAM to the exchange was destroyed and uneconomic to repair first from the CHC earthquake they deployed a few in a hurry and then more so post Kaikorua to get voice service back up quickly. Then all they needed to fix only the fibre backhaul back into the REN rather than needing to fix a huge copper bundle. Then used ISAM-V cards in the DSLAMS (aka Baseband IP) to map the lines on a one to one basis via the SBCs to an ordered sequence of ports on the NEAX. This was so that the provisioning was kept simple and there weren't any real changes in the provisioning process from ICMS into the NEAX, basically re-map port x on the NEAX to a new "port" and it happens to now be a SIP end point. Then hard-code the ISAM-V and SBCs to map port 1 on the ISAM-V card to port 1 on the LMSIP card. Then the ISAM-V card has a hotline so as soon as you pick up the home line it "dials 1" and then you get a dial tone on the NEAX.

 

It wasn't a solution I particularly fond of due to various reasons I don't want to talk about but I appreciated the elegance of deploying it where there were no real impacts to provisioning or billing or any of the other bits that make deploying voice hard.






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  # 2157073 9-Jan-2019 14:45
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Lias: ..... Yet the unlimited wireless plans rate limit after what, 22gb? If the rate limiting kicked in after a few hundred gb, I think it would be much more palatable.

 

This simply isn't possible with the present resources. The total number of Gb's a wireless tower can dispense in a month is limited by the radio bandwidth available. By allocating customers a limited slice, everyone gets a fair go. If the Telco's dramatically upped everyone's data cap today, the towers would be swamped tomorrow and everyone's experience would be worse. A data cap allows the customer to self moderate - unlimited or very large caps means the customer gets limited by the next weakest link in the network and looses control of the quality of their service.

 

Unlimited wireless has been tried overseas in places and it was a failure that left everyone unhappy.


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