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  # 2155144 5-Jan-2019 22:43
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snnet:

 


It's not a friend of a friend tale, its family whom I know don't lie speaking directly to their new neighbour actually. 



Sorry but it has to be rubbish story about fibre to the gate for a staff member in a non fibre area

John



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  # 2155145 5-Jan-2019 22:43
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freitasm:

 

I think you better check your time machine. Seven digits has been the standard for many years, even before I moved here in the mid-90s.

 



 

Kind of unrelated, but how many digits were phone numbers (and area codes) in Brazil? A friend of mine who lives there seems to have a long-as phone number (but it works!).


 
 
 
 


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  # 2155146 5-Jan-2019 22:45
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Linux:
snnet:

 

 

 

 

 

It's not a friend of a friend tale, its family whom I know don't lie speaking directly to their new neighbour actually. 

 



Sorry but it has to be rubbish story about fibre to the gate for a staff member in a non fibre area

John

 

The only way it's going to be rubbish is if the guy "high up" is a liar. I guess time will tell if the directional drilling suddenly ceases after starting a couple of weeks of him demanding it be done.


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  # 2155148 5-Jan-2019 22:55
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snnet:

Linux:
snnet:


 


 


It's not a friend of a friend tale, its family whom I know don't lie speaking directly to their new neighbour actually. 




Sorry but it has to be rubbish story about fibre to the gate for a staff member in a non fibre area

John


The only way it's going to be rubbish is if the guy "high up" is a liar. I guess time will tell if the directional drilling suddenly ceases after starting a couple of weeks of him demanding it be done.



@ChorusNZ Sound like porkies to you?

Staff member demands fibre in non fibre area gets fibre laid to the gate?

John



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  # 2155154 5-Jan-2019 23:51
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NGA on Application maybe?


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  # 2155177 6-Jan-2019 09:41
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quickymart:

 

NGA on Application maybe?

 

 

I did ask and they said that, no, he was specific about it being allocated funding by Chorus.

 

I absolutely expect the official line to be that there is no way this would happen. if it wasn't officially denied and it reached mainstream media a LOT of people would be annoyed.


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  # 2155179 6-Jan-2019 09:43
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DarthKermit:

 

We are all expected to pay the market price of rurally produced commodities like dairy products and wood. Therefore it's only fair that people who live rurally should pay the market price for interwebz.

 

 

I have no problem with that, but the government upfronted the cost of the urban network and I think rural might expect similar where cost is within reasonable limits and timeframes.

 

As I have said, there's an enormous amount of backhaul/link fibre in the ground that covers most rural areas. That's natural because cities and towns and celltowers etc are serviced by fibre and the rurals are captured by the crossfire. With the bit of reading I've done I don't see the fibre distribution(powerline at least) to be orders of magnitude above urban delivery. The OLT cost and frequency may be more but I  believe there is modularity in that or it will be similar to cabinetisation, cable cost is certainly more but perhaps not excessively when multi-stranded on a line. 

 

Waimarama, an isolated seaside holiday retreat is on the 2022 fibre roll-out, thanks to famous resident Rod Drury, no doubt, but high population/production areas areas like the Heretaunga Plains, Bay of Plenty and the Canterbury Plains will never get it, I don't see that.

 

 


 
 
 
 


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  # 2155181 6-Jan-2019 09:58
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snnet:

 

quickymart:

 

NGA on Application maybe?

 

 

I did ask and they said that, no, he was specific about it being allocated funding by Chorus.

 

I absolutely expect the official line to be that there is no way this would happen. if it wasn't officially denied and it reached mainstream media a LOT of people would be annoyed.

 

 

That is why I call BS sorry

 

John


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  # 2155184 6-Jan-2019 10:06
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Lias:

cyril7: 3 digits,..... 5 years ago, nah, in the mid 80s with the introduction of the NEAX's we moved to the 7 digit numbering still in use. That's nearly 30yrs before you mentioned.

Unless someone has better detail regarding the number system history.

Cyril


I lived there in the early 90's and when I lived there you couldn't direct dial tolls, had to get the operator and say this is Rangiwahia 123 and I'd like to call 04 12345567. The community phone list published as of 2013 still has 3 digit numbers for most people on the list, although on looking again it does say "Remember to dial 3282 first" so it looks as if they are indeed on 7 digits now, but almost everyone is on the same first 4 digits so they just ignore it in the list.


InstallerUFB:


RGW (A then on to B) is actually feed on a double hope microwave link from Palmerston North (that is where it is switched) (the UAX Swicth was pulled out in the 80s) / This is an RBI area (managed by Vodafone) so unfortunatly at this stage, there would be no financial incentive for any network company to lay in 20km of fibre over on slip prone roadways to feed less than maybe 40 customers who are close enough to actually use faster BB



Wow still.. when I lived there their was a microwave tower on the top of the hill on our land, and I believe my parents got a small payment for it's presence. I kind of assumed it would have been replaced by now, but I guess not. So question, would the Vodafone RBI tower not need fibre backhaul if it's going to offer decent speeds? Seems a no brainer to me that every new RBI celltower should have fibre running to it, and if you are already running fibre for the towers, why not either simultaneously run fibre for other services or require it to be shared infrastructure? 


 



So the three or four digits were most definitely correct, even to this day,....,...in the users heads, but the neax based phone system was and only ever 7 digits on local numbering.

Cyril

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  # 2155185 6-Jan-2019 10:07
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snnet:

 

quickymart:

 

NGA on Application maybe?

 

 

I did ask and they said that, no, he was specific about it being allocated funding by Chorus.

 

I absolutely expect the official line to be that there is no way this would happen. if it wasn't officially denied and it reached mainstream media a LOT of people would be annoyed.

 

 

Chorus being a public company would be highly unlikely to do any favors for staff around prioritising fibre rollouts, I knew of people very high up near exec level who were in areas with ASAM's/Conklins for a long time waiting for upgrades and all waited their place in the queue, Also funding for these rollouts is not as simple as Chorus allocating funding, it needs to go through a lot of hoops and if its fibre then often its Crownfibre/MBIE allocating funding and listing priority areas, priority areas never just happen because one person wants fibre. 

 

However if you are prepared to pay, then Chorus will pretty much connect you to fibre anywhere - as quickmart says NGA on application is used and providers have hooked up a number of people in Rural areas to NGA - some in situations that would have never had fibre, I've been involved with a few of these but never seen a bill for less than 5 figures to do so as often they need to install new OLT (and the customer pays for everything including a margin by Chorus) even if fibre is rightoutside their gate, these customers also don't get the government free connection subsidy either so need to factor that in. 


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  # 2155186 6-Jan-2019 10:29
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Lastman:

 

Waimarama, an isolated seaside holiday retreat is on the 2022 fibre roll-out, thanks to famous resident Rod Drury, no doubt, but high population/production areas areas like the Heretaunga Plains, Bay of Plenty and the Canterbury Plains will never get it, I don't see that.

 

 

Rubbish. It has absolutely nothing to do with Rod.

 

Waimarama fully meets the requirements of the UFB2+ rollout.

 

There are plenty of places getting UFB coverage as part of UFB2+ that have similar populations - Hihi (with a 2013 census population of 170 population) and Matapouri (2013 census figure of 160 people) and are just a couple of examples that are both less than Waimarama's 2013 figure of 190

 

Population density is just as important as population, and in many of these small townships that are (comparatively) dense, UFB simply makes sense.

 

 

 

 


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  # 2155188 6-Jan-2019 10:38
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I wonder why the town of Norsewood (population around 300) isn't getting UFB?


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  # 2155218 6-Jan-2019 11:20
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sbiddle:

 

Lastman:

 

Waimarama, an isolated seaside holiday retreat is on the 2022 fibre roll-out, thanks to famous resident Rod Drury, no doubt, but high population/production areas areas like the Heretaunga Plains, Bay of Plenty and the Canterbury Plains will never get it, I don't see that.

 

 

Rubbish. It has absolutely nothing to do with Rod.

 

Waimarama fully meets the requirements of the UFB2+ rollout.

 

There are plenty of places getting UFB coverage as part of UFB2+ that have similar populations - Hihi (with a 2013 census population of 170 population) and Matapouri (2013 census figure of 160 people) and are just a couple of examples that are both less than Waimarama's 2013 figure of 190

 

Population density is just as important as population, and in many of these small townships that are (comparatively) dense, UFB simply makes sense.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fair enough, but I believe Rod lobbied for the cell service there, that meant there was fibre put out there( or perhaps a microwave link or something?) and so made the FTTH a lot cheaper in relation.


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  # 2155221 6-Jan-2019 11:35
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Thinking out loud...the backhaul cables and FTTH feeding cables are probably in conduit for expansion and protection? I know they have inspection pits every so often. Given that the OLT range is about 20km, putting the feed cables back through to the pits and splitting them from there would cover a large part of the rurals at not great expense ie using the OLTs already in place.


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  # 2155224 6-Jan-2019 11:55
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Lastman:

 

Thinking out loud...the backhaul cables and FTTH feeding cables are probably in conduit for expansion and protection? I know they have inspection pits every so often. Given that the OLT range is about 20km, putting the feed cables back through to the pits and splitting them from there would cover a large part of the rurals at not great expense ie using the OLTs already in place.

 

 

Except your not considering all the other constraints to using gpon, power level requirements per splitter etc.

 

 

 

then you have to consider things like transport To the man holes, installation of gear to the properties, traffic management to allow all this to be done safely, Cost of the further conduit and ONT's.

 

 

 

 

 

I don't disagree, I'm in a rural area, i'd love fibre here rather than the crazy things i do to optimize. 

 

but i do need to be realistic.

 

 

 

 

 

I see power companies in the best position to offer rural services, take for example Vector. While upgrading their Power network, could string along fibre and make double use out of their planend work.

 

Unison have already done this, and they beat chorus in pricing..





#include <std_disclaimer>

 

Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.


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