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Gemini

372 posts

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#171147 8-Apr-2015 07:01
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The rubber seal that surrounds the glass in my aluminium windows has lifted out of the frame
They are 30 years old so I suspect they have simply shrunk as I'm told rubber does over time
Can I replace them myself? Where can I get the rubber? Any special tools to make it easier to get the new seal in?

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RunningMan
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  #1278752 8-Apr-2015 07:40
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I've contacted these guys and found them good to deal with previously

http://www.awsltd.co.nz

Jase2985
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  #1278753 8-Apr-2015 07:44
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there is a special tool to get the rubber out and back in.

you could try the company that made the joinery for the rubber, and there are other companys that make 3rd party seals.

 
 
 
 


ratsun81
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  #1278782 8-Apr-2015 08:58
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Gemini: The rubber seal that surrounds the glass in my aluminium windows has lifted out of the frame
They are 30 years old so I suspect they have simply shrunk as I'm told rubber does over time
Can I replace them myself? Where can I get the rubber? Any special tools to make it easier to get the new seal in?


Im going to assume you are referring to the seals that sit in the channels on the outside facing window? I think its called glazing wedge.

Ive done this before its not too difficult. You will need to make sure you get the right sized rubber. And do buy the tool to put the new seals in, it makes life so much easier.

On some windows there is a plastic strip that you call pull off to get better access to the rubber seals, be careful as being outside and exposed to the elements it breaks quite easily. 



highspeedsteel
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  #1278798 8-Apr-2015 09:13
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Another option,

http://www.joineryhardware.co.nz/aluminium-doors-window-parts.php?category=60 

I've replaced the glazing wedge on several windows at my place, I haven't got the special tool, but will probably buy before I do any more as it will make like much easier. 

Cheers,

gbwelly
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  #1278812 8-Apr-2015 09:39
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Gemini: The rubber seal that surrounds the glass in my aluminium windows has lifted out of the frame
They are 30 years old so I suspect they have simply shrunk as I'm told rubber does over time
Can I replace them myself? Where can I get the rubber? Any special tools to make it easier to get the new seal in?


One tip is to spray the wedge with window cleaner to get it slippery when you are putting it in.








timmmay
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  #1278818 8-Apr-2015 09:48
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cool

Jeeves
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  #1278819 8-Apr-2015 09:48
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The big shed hardware stores sell rubber seals by the meter - but not sure if they specifically sell the wedge stuff - I think it's more the draft stopping type that the window frame presses against when you shut it.

 
 
 
 


Gemini

372 posts

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#1278844 8-Apr-2015 10:38
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Ok thanks
Will go to awsltd tomorrow for 1m of glazing wedge and a glazing tool. Have window cleaner already cool

Gemini

372 posts

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  #1280125 10-Apr-2015 06:59
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Actually wondering now what is the point of replacing galzing wedge?

 

It has had gaps in the corners for at least 10 years with no ill effects

TonyR1973
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  #1281031 11-Apr-2015 12:21
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Gemini: Actually wondering now what is the point of replacing galzing wedge? It has had gaps in the corners for at least 10 years with no ill effects


Minimise draughts with a malleable contact face which compensates for any distortion in the frame or window, allow for a spring-like tension on the latch to stop rattling in the wind.

CutCutCut
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  #1298227 5-May-2015 11:18
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Just to jump in on the back of this, what is the name of the seal on the Window fram itself where the closed window seals with the frame? Ours have all shrunk and some are starting to perish. Is it DIY-able to replace?

Dulouz
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  #1298279 5-May-2015 11:58
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CutCutCut: Just to jump in on the back of this, what is the name of the seal on the Window fram itself where the closed window seals with the frame? Ours have all shrunk and some are starting to perish. Is it DIY-able to replace?


You generally need whats called wedge rubber as well as butterfly rubber.

We used a professional to do our whole house, after watching them do it I'm glad I did.




Amanon

CutCutCut
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  #1298334 5-May-2015 13:11
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Dulouz:
CutCutCut: Just to jump in on the back of this, what is the name of the seal on the Window fram itself where the closed window seals with the frame? Ours have all shrunk and some are starting to perish. Is it DIY-able to replace?


You generally need whats called wedge rubber as well as butterfly rubber.

We used a professional to do our whole house, after watching them do it I'm glad I did.


Yes I thought that might be the case, we haven't got a huge house but still quite a few windows to deal with. I think that'll probably be the sensible option for me too.

mattwnz
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  #1298399 5-May-2015 13:56
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timmmay:

cool


Sealants are never the best solution for exterior seals. They are only a temporary fix, and can make the problem worse over time, as the sealant breaks down, causing a capillary gap that draws in water. Best to stick with the manufacturers own seals, which often have a special weather grove to allows from draining.

KennyM
208 posts

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  #1300255 7-May-2015 22:17
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The rubber the window closes against is we would call a 'backing rubber'

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