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Starlith

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#304474 7-May-2023 13:18
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Can anyone explain to me this situation.

 

A new sub division built directly across the road with new neigbours facing parents house and they have fibre but somehow the parents can't tap off that?

 

Parents have an RD address.

 

How can they not give fibre to them? Or maybe a better question.

 

How can they get fibre in this situation?

 


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wired
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  #3073391 7-May-2023 13:36
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The developers of a new subdivision usually pay the fibre company to install the fibre around the their streets ready for the new home owners  to connect to when they are building.

 

As your property wouldn’t have been part of that deal that is why you’re re treated differently. 

The good news is that when a fibre company extends their network they usually consider the houses along the route of the feeder cable so your house may be served in time.


 
 
 

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richms
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  #3073410 7-May-2023 16:26
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Crossing the road is expensive. Moreso in rural areas where its normally a busy state highway type road. They have not yet planned or built on your side of the road.

 

If you put in a special request to have it installed there will probably be 20k of traffic management on the bill before they even start to dig and install stuff.

 

That is assuming there is anything accross the road to tap into, as normally those subdivisions do not have anything facing out onto the busy road and the cableing will be done on their internal roads at the same time they put power and water and sewer etc in.





Richard rich.ms

Linux
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  #3073415 7-May-2023 16:36
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My parents built a new subdivision on the North Shore and paid Chorus to come lay the fibre to all the sections before any houses were built

 

Was no problem at all




robjg63
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  #3073428 7-May-2023 17:48
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Unfortunately, there is always a line somewhere.
In your parents situation, its the other side of the road.
They might as well be kms away.
Annoying as hell, but just bad luck.

Many posts here on GZ with similar complaints.




Nothing is impossible for the man who doesn't have to do it himself - A. H. Weiler


mudguard
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  #3073431 7-May-2023 18:03
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Linux:

 

My parents built a new subdivision on the North Shore and paid Chorus to come lay the fibre to all the sections before any houses were built

 

Was no problem at all

 

 

I'm not sure how useful that is to the OP? I'm sure anyone can work it if you are prepared to pay for something you can just about solve anything. 


Linux
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  #3073477 7-May-2023 18:17
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mudguard:

 

Linux:

 

My parents built a new subdivision on the North Shore and paid Chorus to come lay the fibre to all the sections before any houses were built

 

Was no problem at all

 

 

I'm not sure how useful that is to the OP? I'm sure anyone can work it if you are prepared to pay for something you can just about solve anything. 

 

 

Sorry read post again and you are correct does not help at all


michaelmurfy
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  #3073478 7-May-2023 18:18
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Something else you can do is make friends with somebody across the road, get port 2 of their ONT provisioned with your own service then set up a wireless peer to peer link to your house (Ubiquiti Nanobeam or similar).





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everettpsycho
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  #3073479 7-May-2023 18:44
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As wired said, the provisioning of a subdivision is entirely paid for by the developers and not the fibre company, but the fibre laid is entirely owned by the fibre company so they can choose to use it as they see fit. If they were going past other properties with distribution ducts anyway they would likely choose to feed those houses or leave enough capacity for anticipated future expansion in the area.

Unfortunately road crossings require road closures, and that bumps up the price significantly, even more so on a busy road or road operated by nzta. One of the biggest expenses in the world of civil works in NZ is traffic management and that can increase 10 fold when nzta are involved.

What a lot of people also don't understand is that feeder ducts are for larger feeder cables, so if a map tell you there's fibre running past, or there's locator sticks, it may be completely unfeasible to use that cable or duct for a single premises. Sticking low count fibres in is a waste of wider duct that could be needed later, but using one of the feeder cables strands of fibre would mean something needs to be installed to manage all the unused cables as you can't just use one without breaking in to the entire cable, and is also wasteful as that cable could be feeding 23 other properties if run to a cabinet and split like the rest of the strands. In this instance I can't see the new land parcels, but there may not actually be any distribution on that stretch.

nztim
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  #3073484 7-May-2023 19:08
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If your house is not part of the initial UFB1/UFB2 rollout you pay for your installation this doesn’t matter if its a property developer or.an individual home owner.




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Bung
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  #3073486 7-May-2023 19:16
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When fibre was run down our old Wellington Street it was thrust about 100m under the grass verge. Do they not do this crossing under roads?

  #3073493 7-May-2023 19:28
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Bung: When fibre was run down our old Wellington Street it was thrust about 100m under the grass verge. Do they not do this crossing under roads?

 

still requires traffic management


quickymart
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  #3073499 7-May-2023 20:11
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As per above - the developer would have paid the Local Fibre Company (usually Chorus) to install fibre into the properties inside their subdivision only. This will not cover any surrounding streets or areas.

 

If your parents want fibre, they will need to get a quote and then pay for it to be installed.


BarTender
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  #3073597 8-May-2023 05:35
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Or have a conversation with an owner in the new subdivision and see if they can run a point to point wireless link.




and


nzkc
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  #3073599 8-May-2023 07:22
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michaelmurfy:

 

Something else you can do is make friends with somebody across the road, get port 2 of their ONT provisioned with your own service then set up a wireless peer to peer link to your house (Ubiquiti Nanobeam or similar).

 

 

I'd be concerned about what is going to happen if/when they come to sell. No guarantee that the new owners will agree to keep this set up at all. Nothing you'd be able to do about that. Makes this a more risky proposition.


nztim
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  #3073612 8-May-2023 08:38
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nzkc:

 

I'd be concerned about what is going to happen if/when they come to sell. No guarantee that the new owners will agree to keep this set up at all. Nothing you'd be able to do about that. Makes this a more risky proposition.

 

 

New owners will need to come up with their own solution, this would not be a permanent solution for the house.





Any views expressed on these forums are my own and don't necessarily reflect those of my employer. 


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