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  # 1332734 27-Jun-2015 19:42
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  # 1356273 31-Jul-2015 18:35
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Interestingly, I got the same call with the same offer again today.

I asked why they were calling me again on something I had told them I didn't want, and they didn't seem to know.

I explained why I didn't want it, and the guy thanked me and politely apologised for bothering me. Which was a heck of a lot better than the first call, and showed that at least one of their contractors knows how to deal with people.

Of note, when I explicitly stated that I was thinking of imminently cancelling Sky because it was no longer a good deal this again prompted no questions or attempt at retention.


 
 
 
 


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  # 1358597 4-Aug-2015 12:15
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We stop them mid question and ask if they are providing us with a free TV in the offer.
They get puzzled so we explain: we haven't got a TV so a great Sky deal (of any sort) is useless.

We don't get called so often now




<- don't ask me where I am - I haven't a clue: its a tech thing ;)
Housewife computerer: not particularly great at either. 
And don't take me too seriously. 


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  # 1358682 4-Aug-2015 13:47
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THis all sounds like the HRV saga again...




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  # 1358693 4-Aug-2015 14:02
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Im awaiting a call from Sky to offer us their latest deal. We just returned the box yesterday. :-p





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Hmm, what to write...
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  # 1358702 4-Aug-2015 14:12
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wsnz:
Rikkitic: What is the penalty for refusing to comply? Surely just a fine and not a criminal conviction. If this happened to me I would be prepared to fight it through the courts. Not if I was an employer, I can see the justification for that, but certainly as a private citizen. 


Provisions by the Statistics Act 1975, allow for an individual to receive a criminal conviction and a fine not exceeding $500, while for businesses the fine is up to $2000.



And that is every time you fail to prove the data they want, It can get very expensive if you get selected for one of their detailed surveys and refuse to cooperate

and no it is not a criminal conviction ... That would be the crimes act...





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  # 1358716 4-Aug-2015 14:37
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This bothers me as a matter of principle. What about subtle sabotage as a form of protest? Answers that make sense but are not actually correct? If everyone did it ... 




I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


 
 
 
 


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  # 1358775 4-Aug-2015 15:48
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Jesus, don't those fascists get enough personal data out of us already on census night?

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  # 1388562 16-Sep-2015 15:08
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mdooher:
wsnz:
Rikkitic: What is the penalty for refusing to comply? Surely just a fine and not a criminal conviction. If this happened to me I would be prepared to fight it through the courts. Not if I was an employer, I can see the justification for that, but certainly as a private citizen. 


Provisions by the Statistics Act 1975, allow for an individual to receive a criminal conviction and a fine not exceeding $500, while for businesses the fine is up to $2000.



And that is every time you fail to prove the data they want, It can get very expensive if you get selected for one of their detailed surveys and refuse to cooperate

and no it is not a criminal conviction ... That would be the crimes act...



Simply out of interest - and to ensure it wasn't some form of con going on I rang statistics NZ and asked about it, they said it was "essential data related to the unemployment rate in New Zealand".

So I have to ask unless this guy has the misfortune to be unemployed as I know how tough that can be - why are they asking? and if he is unemployed then surely the information on his income would be known and barring any extra earnings would be fixed...

Very odd behavior asking someone with a government supplied income how much money the government is paying them when in theory its all there on a governmental computer system.

And definitely a very totalitarian ethos.

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  # 1388576 16-Sep-2015 15:30
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wsnz:
Rikkitic: What is the penalty for refusing to comply? Surely just a fine and not a criminal conviction. If this happened to me I would be prepared to fight it through the courts. Not if I was an employer, I can see the justification for that, but certainly as a private citizen. 


Provisions by the Statistics Act 1975, allow for an individual to receive a criminal conviction and a fine not exceeding $500, while for businesses the fine is up to $2000.

What's the penalty for just making up bogus information and giving them a steaming pile of $#@& for their statistics?



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  # 1388656 16-Sep-2015 18:12
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andrew027:
wsnz:
Rikkitic: What is the penalty for refusing to comply? Surely just a fine and not a criminal conviction. If this happened to me I would be prepared to fight it through the courts. Not if I was an employer, I can see the justification for that, but certainly as a private citizen. 


Provisions by the Statistics Act 1975, allow for an individual to receive a criminal conviction and a fine not exceeding $500, while for businesses the fine is up to $2000.

What's the penalty for just making up bogus information and giving them a steaming pile of $#@& for their statistics?


Very little, particularly if you are smart about it and don't enter information that is obviously bogus.

Where you are compelled to provide personal information that you don't think is being justifiably sought, and where declining isn't possible/easy, then poisoning the data is a perfectly acceptable response.

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  # 1388703 16-Sep-2015 20:31
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Rikkitic: This bothers me as a matter of principle. What about subtle sabotage as a form of protest? Answers that make sense but are not actually correct? If everyone did it ... 


Good grief man, as someone else stated they couldn't care LESS about YOU, they are looking for data that allows them to benefit everyone. You doing what you are suggesting would mean that money would be spend on projects in areas that didn't need it, couldn't use it, or wouldn't use it. What a waste of my tax payer dollars. 

If your privacy means that much to you that anonymous collection would cause you to lie, perhaps you could migrate elsewhere to a country which has no such requirements... Oh wait, all civilised countries do it...

I have been asked to provide incredible detailed information that took hours to compile at expense to myself about my business income, clients etc. THAT was intrusive, and initially I resisted, but in the end, they are doing it for the good of the country so now we just do our best. 



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  # 1388710 16-Sep-2015 20:55
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First, everybody does NOT do it. I have lived in many countries and New Zealand is one of the worst when it comes to official intrusions on personal privacy. Second, I have no objection to providing information that is anonymised. What I object to is the linking forever of the data to the person who provides it. This is not necessary for the purposes stated. Other countries manage it. Why can't this one? Third, official agencies in this country do not have a sterling record when it comes to protecting the privacy of information that has been entrusted to them. Until they do better they have no business demanding my cooperation. Fourth, I happen to like living here. I just don't like the data collection policies. Fortunately the Bill of Rights allows me to speak out on such matters.





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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