Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




78 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 1


Topic # 179285 3-Sep-2015 08:51
Send private message

Hey guys,

I bought a Galaxy S6 a little over a month ago. It started having issues (constant reboots/shutdowns), so I took it into DSE to get repaired/get a replacement. The first time I brought it back, it was only 2 days out of the 14 day Early Life Failure period... so I had to get it sent away for repair instead of an on the spot replacement.
Thought they would be a little more understanding considering its a $1000 phone but ..no. All well and good, so we agreed to have it sent away, then they asked me to pay a $90 bond to send it off as they told me they didn't see a fault despite the phone rebooting by itself as it was sitting on the desk in front of them.

I thought it was ridiculous as the phone was essentially new, and obviously faulty - I have never had to pay bonds when an item was within the warranty period. So of course they said, pay it or keep your faulty phone.

I ended up getting the Samsung guys to help me send it off. Got my phone back 2 and a half weeks later. Motherboard and charging board had been replaced. 
3 hours into using it after repair...it rebooted while I was on a phone call -_-? I factory reset it that night, and used it as normal making sure to only put essential apps on there (email, work app, no games etc).

It has been almost two weeks since I got the phone back, and it's rebooted 5 times total (most times when it's just sitting on the table doing nothing).

Samsung told me to go ahead and send it back to them to get it looked at again, however, the reboots this time round are not constant i.e. 5 times in 2 weeks vs. 20+ reboots in a day (before repair).

Will be sending it in again, although a bit nervous as the issue might not present itself while being inspected. 
I expressed how annoyed I was that the phone was not fixed, and was told that if it's verified faulty 4 times, I'm entitled to a replacement. I'm guessing however that it would be a refurbished unit. 

Of course I'd be happy if they managed to find the problem second time round. Don't get me wrong, I am very appreciative to Samsung who have helped me when DSE was being difficult, however the guy told me they hadn't come across this issue before which is not very comforting. Makes me feel like they're just replacing things willy nilly hoping it will fix the reboot issue.
They also told me not to install 3rd party apps - but aren't all Play Store apps 3rd party? What's the point in owning a phone to have only stock apps on there?

Is 4 repairs before replacement reasonable? It's a great annoyance considering I've barely been able to use my phone in the time I've owned it as it's been away for repairs. Essentially I just paid $1000 for a phone that's been tinkered with. Would have been better off buying secondhand.

Create new topic
2640 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 631


  Reply # 1378755 3-Sep-2015 09:02
Send private message

I'd suggest providing them with four opportunities to fix a fault is not 'within a reasonable time', given the cumulative total (in time and impact) of the multiple repairs. There's nothing in the Act that specifies the number of attempts they're allowed, but rather...

From Consumer's website (https://www.consumer.org.nz/articles/consumer-guarantees-act) (bold added):

 

If the problem is minor, and can be fixed, the retailer can choose to either repair, replace or refund.

 

A service provider must fix the problem within a reasonable time.

 

If the problem can't be fixed, or can't be put right within a reasonable time, or is substantial, you can:

 

  • Reject the product and choose a replacement of the same type and similar value or a full refund of your purchase price; or
  • Claim compensation for any drop in the value of the product or service.
  • Cancel the service contract, pay for any satisfactory work already done, and get someone else to finish the repairs; or
  • Have it repaired elsewhere and recover the costs from the retailer, if they refuse to fix a faulty product, or fail to do so in a reasonable time.
When you have the right to reject the goods, sellers cannot just offer a credit note. If you want a refund, you are entitled to it – by cash, cheque or credit card charge reversal.

 

Substantial means:

 

  • A reasonable consumer wouldn't have bought the goods if they'd known about the fault.
  • The goods are significantly different from their description, sample or demonstration model.
  • The goods are substantially unfit for purpose.
  • The goods are unsafe

Similar material here http://www.consumeraffairs.govt.nz/for-consumers/law/consumer-guarantees-act/got-a-problem-with-goods#reject



78 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 1


  Reply # 1378930 3-Sep-2015 11:08
Send private message

Yeah, I was planning to send it in a second time, and then demanding I get a replacement or refund if it's still not fixed. 
Still wouldn't be 100% happy that I paid that much for a phone that had replacement internals, but at least they would have held up their end of the bargain and I would have a fully working phone.

Phone also has other issues apart from the reboot (i.e. no push notifications if I have any form of lockscreen on there - stock fingerprint lockscreen). At times, spazzes out and won't let me swipe the screen to get to homescreen. Swipe > Display turns off > Press power button > Display comes on 3 seconds later but just shows the wallpaper and nothing else - have to restart phone to get it working again. DSE just suggested F.Reset then proceeded to blame my apps. Haven't asked Samsung about it, nor seen anyone else complain about the same thing when Googling issues.

Not sure how it's going to work if they come back saying "no fault" though as I would then not be entitled to ask for anything?
Assuming I would probably have to stick with the phone again until it breaks down the next time?

 
 
 
 


4937 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1314

Trusted
Microsoft

  Reply # 1378970 3-Sep-2015 12:04
Send private message

just don't back down. you have consumer rights, exercise them.

2060 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 225

Subscriber

  Reply # 1378986 3-Sep-2015 12:32
Send private message

When this happened to me with a different brand of phone I sent it away twice for repairs.  When I picked it up the second time I was able to demonstrate it was still faulty.  The guy in the shop called his manager and 10 minutes later I had a new phone.

This is pretty much in line with your experience, if it comes back faulty from Samsung the second time they obviously can't fix it.  

584 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 40

Trusted

  Reply # 1378987 3-Sep-2015 12:32
Send private message

You should have watched Fair Go from last night...




The little things make the biggest difference.



78 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 1


  Reply # 1378997 3-Sep-2015 12:49
Send private message

Stopped watching TV a few years back :L anywhere I can watch it online?

Thanks for the reply guys. Will send it in and see what happens.Don't think I can show him at the shop when it occurs frequently but randomly but will definitely ask for a new phone if it comes back faulty again.

Hopefully I get a different manager next time. The one that told me to pay the bond to send my phone off was the manager

282 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 76


  Reply # 1379065 3-Sep-2015 13:40
Send private message

This article seems to clear up a lot of questions regarding this issue.

https://www.consumer.org.nz/articles/faulty-mobile-phones



78 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 1


  Reply # 1379068 3-Sep-2015 13:45
Send private message

cheers

have read the article already but it was from 2013 so wasn't sure if still relevant.
also wanted to be reasonable and not spout CGA if I'm not in the right

Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Air New Zealand experiments with blockchain technology
Posted 23-Nov-2017 15:39


Symantec selects Amazon Web Services to deliver cloud security
Posted 23-Nov-2017 10:40


New Zealand Ministry of Education chooses Unisys for cloud-based education resourcing management system
Posted 22-Nov-2017 22:00


Business analytics software powers profits for NZ wine producers
Posted 22-Nov-2017 21:52


Pyrios strikes up alliance with Microsoft integrator UC Logiq
Posted 22-Nov-2017 21:51


The New Zealand IT services ecosystem - it's all digital down here
Posted 22-Nov-2017 21:49


Volvo to supply tens of thousands of autonomous drive compatible cars to Uber
Posted 22-Nov-2017 21:46


From small to medium and beyond: Navigating the ERP battlefield
Posted 21-Nov-2017 21:12


Business owners: ERP software selection starts (and finishes) with you
Posted 21-Nov-2017 21:11


Why I'm not an early adopter
Posted 21-Nov-2017 10:39


Netatmo launches smart home products in New Zealand
Posted 20-Nov-2017 20:06


Huawei Mate 10: Punchy, long battery life, artificial intelligence
Posted 20-Nov-2017 16:30


Propel launch Disney Star Wars Laser Battle Drones
Posted 19-Nov-2017 21:26


UFB killer app: Speed
Posted 17-Nov-2017 17:01


The case for RSS — MacSparky
Posted 13-Nov-2017 14:35



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.