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Glurp
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Topic # 160218 28-Dec-2014 16:42
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I am unashamedly old-fashioned. Partly this is due to the circumstance that broadband only recently became available to me, and I am still playing catch-up. Partly it is due to my age and personality. I am distrustful of fads and I prefer the tried and true over the latest and greatest.

One of the fads I distrust is the movement to cloud computing. I like physical possession. I enjoy the security of knowing that my data resides securely on a hard drive that belongs to me. I don’t like the idea that I am renting property on someone else’s real estate, and that I have to rely on an Internet connection to access what should already be mine.

What I dislike and fear is the lack of choice. Every time there is a stampede to the latest wonder of technology, other options for those who do not want to jump on the bandwagon start to disappear. I don’t want to be part of the cloud for a very practical reason: Now that ultra-fast fibre is becoming widespread, providers of services I also depend on are rushing to the assumption that everyone has access to unlimited high-speed broadband. Well, I don’t and I probably never will. My broadband is and will likely always be RBI wireless with a data cap. So will I get left in the dust again, like I did with dial-up?

In recent days a major international corporation has had its private parts exposed to the world by vengeful hackers. Gamers were unable to try out their new Christmas toys for two days because some rogue lizards were able to disable the two major on-line gaming platforms. Major web sites are brought down on a daily basis by ddos attacks carried out by agents of evil and frisky adolescents. Apparently the Internet is so insecure by design that almost anyone with a grudge and some pre-fabricated software can bring the world to its knees.

In view of all this recent experience, I have to ask, why would anyone in their right mind want to depend on cloud computing for anything? Are cloud-dwellers idiots?






I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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  Reply # 1205032 28-Dec-2014 16:56
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My email is cloud, I use Cloud Office Apps, I am currently using about 3.5 terabytes of could storage which is growing rapidly.
I use cloud as my off site back up. Cloud is not a fad.




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The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

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  Reply # 1205040 28-Dec-2014 17:00
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Its scale-able, cheaper, faster and easier to deploy.

Cloud apps/computing isn't new and you really need to define the type of cloud you are referring to. Private, public or shared?

You should also ask yourself: does your $100 router and $69 Internet protection compete with $100,000 hardware/software solutions that data centers have.

Yes cloud can seem insecure but if you want to live in the connected world and benefit from such advances as portability and the ability to get cheaper services now, then you have no choice.

Also next time you go on a rant, could you do some research?

I remember the 56k days and the many times I was hacked then, ie had so many security flaws it was a joke, and the time some kid took over my os.




 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1205045 28-Dec-2014 17:15
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I use a mixture of on-site and cloud services.

My main use of the cloud is for offsite backups. I am presently migrating from Crashplan to Cyphertite, which offers increased security. I also use some providers which are unencrypted for storage of encrypted archives only. I will not use the cloud for document storage, nor would I use it for mail storage or exchange. Sadly, spam is no longer the problem, mail filters are. I don't trust third parties to filter content in an acceptable way.

In general, I would prefer to set up something myself than trust a third party with my data or configuration. Backup is an exception, because I'm only trusting them to store data I maintain my own independent copies of.

You should never put anything on the Internet you wouldn't want to be made public. The same applies to cloud services, along with the principle that you should never entrust anything to the cloud exclusively, that you cannot afford to lose.

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  Reply # 1205051 28-Dec-2014 17:31
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No, "cloud dwellers" are not idiots.  People who rely on one service as the silver bullet are idiots.

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  Reply # 1205058 28-Dec-2014 17:46
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no it's the way of the future.

life is not the same as it used to be.

I didn't have google in high school - only library books




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  Reply # 1205069 28-Dec-2014 18:07
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Ive had a few hdds die over the years, losing all my photos/music etc.  being on the cloud or streaming services provides me with the much needed off site backup.  If i take a photo on my phone, its instantly backed up to multiple locations, so if i lose my phone or its broken etc, my photos are safe.

if im at work and want to listen to some music i own, i just type in play.google.com and listen away, no need to carry a external hdd with me whereever i go.  

sure dont make a document on google docs called "all my important personal information and banking details", a little common sense and cloud storage/services are a great thing.

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  Reply # 1205070 28-Dec-2014 18:08
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Rikkitic:
I am unashamedly old-fashioned.


And with that the rest of the post was pretty redundant. 

But pray tell, why are you starting a topic where you ask if "Cloud-dwellers" are idiots? What did you hope to achieve?

If you don't like the thought of cloud services, then by all means don't use them. But by your logic you really should stay off of the internet all together, not just the "cloud" services. You know "cloud" in many cases are synonymous for "internet" right?! :)




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  Reply # 1205117 28-Dec-2014 20:03
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You should also ask yourself: does your $100 router and $69 Internet protection compete with $100,000 hardware/software solutions that data centers have.



 Yes but as what? Your business - then fair enough.
Home user data - no thanks, I'll stick with my own in my hands backup devices thanks.


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  Reply # 1205122 28-Dec-2014 20:20
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No. Cloud means elastic processing and storage, it's mostly for business., servers and backup. Security is important regardless of where you're hosting.

Sony was a traditional corporate hack I think, nothing cloud related. Haven't read all the stories though.




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Glurp
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  Reply # 1205129 28-Dec-2014 20:31
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In the course of time I will respond to all who reply here in a measured and respectful fashion but I do not think the moment has yet arrived to mark any response as an ‘answer’. I would first like to see how this discussion develops. My question is meant to be provocative but it also has a serious point. I can see the necessity of on-line backups for businesses that have to shovel a lot of data, but is this really the best approach for everyone? What if you cannot access your data or even your apps? Do you panic or just shut up shop and go to the beach? Make fun of me if you like but it is a valid question.

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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  Reply # 1205135 28-Dec-2014 20:38
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If you require guaranteed access to your data then there are plenty of hybrid solutions available that cater to all types of BCP.  Using the cloud isn't one-size-fits-all and it isn't all or nothing, it's able to be moulded to suit your needs.

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  Reply # 1205136 28-Dec-2014 20:41
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Rikkitic: In the course of time I will respond to all who reply here in a measured and respectful fashion but I do not think the moment has yet arrived to mark any response as an ‘answer’.


The 'answer' is, there is no answer.

Some people are idiots, who will be reckless with their data, lose valuable data when providers collapse, or have information exposed they never intended to make public. Others will harness the power of the cloud and use it wisely in their business or personal lives.

What if you cannot access your data or even your apps? Do you panic or just shut up shop and go to the beach? Make fun of me if you like but it is a valid question.


Again, it depends. Backing up to a cloud provider, and waiting days, weeks, or even months to restore data is certainly a viable option. You could spend hundreds of dollars per month on backup services (including local, high speed cloud storage). You could run your own NAS in colocation or on another site, and duplicate data, or you could spend $10 per month, and take a holiday (at the beach if that's your thing) while you wait for your cloud-based data to be recovered. How wise that is depends entirely on the individual user, and as with all IT decisions, it's another tool available to people, not something they are forced to use, at least not yet.



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  Reply # 1205137 28-Dec-2014 20:43
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timmmay: Sony was a traditional corporate hack I think, nothing cloud related. Haven't read all the stories though.

 

My point was really that nothing connected to the Internet is secure, regardless of claims. Cloud storage is connected to the Internet. Ipso facto.

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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  Reply # 1205138 28-Dec-2014 20:45
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nothing is secure. whether at home or in the cloud or at home but accessible through the cloud.




Swype on iOS is detrimental to accurate typing. Apologies in advance.


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  Reply # 1205140 28-Dec-2014 20:47
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Rikkitic:
timmmay: Sony was a traditional corporate hack I think, nothing cloud related. Haven't read all the stories though.
My point was really that nothing connected to the Internet is secure, regardless of claims. Cloud storage is connected to the Internet. Ipso facto.


Your home computer is connected to the internet, ipso facto everything on your computer is at risk.  Therefore whether you store your files locally or in the cloud is moot by your rationale.

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