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  Reply # 1205793 29-Dec-2014 22:54
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If you don't see the benefit of cloud, don't use it then

No one is forcing you to do anything

Don't like the flexibility, Agility, better optimised Resources? Pay as you go. Think of it as a utility, the ability to access applications and technology as-needed and on-demand, while paying for only what is being utilised

You are probably using cloud services today without realising it

Cloud is now heading thru the hype and into the maturity phase. The 3 mega cloud vendors, Amazon, Google, Microsoft are spending upwards of 90% of their R&D budgets on Cloud technologies.

If you prefer to purchase infrastructure outright instead of renting, if that economic model isn't for you then don't use clouds selling * as a service


Rikkitic:

I am unashamedly old-fashioned. Partly this is due to the circumstance that broadband only recently became available to me, and I am still playing catch-up. Partly it is due to my age and personality. I am distrustful of fads and I prefer the tried and true over the latest and greatest.

One of the fads I distrust is the movement to cloud computing. I like physical possession. I enjoy the security of knowing that my data resides securely on a hard drive that belongs to me. I don’t like the idea that I am renting property on someone else’s real estate, and that I have to rely on an Internet connection to access what should already be mine.

What I dislike and fear is the lack of choice. Every time there is a stampede to the latest wonder of technology, other options for those who do not want to jump on the bandwagon start to disappear. I don’t want to be part of the cloud for a very practical reason: Now that ultra-fast fibre is becoming widespread, providers of services I also depend on are rushing to the assumption that everyone has access to unlimited high-speed broadband. Well, I don’t and I probably never will. My broadband is and will likely always be RBI wireless with a data cap. So will I get left in the dust again, like I did with dial-up?

In recent days a major international corporation has had its private parts exposed to the world by vengeful hackers. Gamers were unable to try out their new Christmas toys for two days because some rogue lizards were able to disable the two major on-line gaming platforms. Major web sites are brought down on a daily basis by ddos attacks carried out by agents of evil and frisky adolescents. Apparently the Internet is so insecure by design that almost anyone with a grudge and some pre-fabricated software can bring the world to its knees.

In view of all this recent experience, I have to ask, why would anyone in their right mind want to depend on cloud computing for anything? Are cloud-dwellers idiots?



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  Reply # 1205992 30-Dec-2014 12:44
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Yea cloud is so stupid. I far prefer using an insecure pptp vpn to connect back to my win 2003 via an adsl1 connection....

/trolling

Seriously, microsoft office 365 is the single best thing to be created in the last few years. When all hooked up with Sky drive it's so dam good for people like me who are constantly on the road.

gzt

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  Reply # 1206002 30-Dec-2014 13:47
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Short answer: Betteridge's law applies.



Glurp
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  Reply # 1206349 31-Dec-2014 10:23
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I want to thank everyone who has contributed to this thread. My question was meant to be provocative, but I also really wanted to know what people think about this. Of course cloud computing is an established technology and business model and of great value to many people. I don’t dispute that. While I personally have not yet felt a pressing need for off-site apps or data storage or other cloud features, I can see the point of these things for those who do benefit from them.

 



 

At the same time, I was trying to make a serious point and some, at least, who have replied here seem to have understood that. New ways of doing things can sometimes have unintended consequences but many people often seem to jump on the latest trends without really thinking things through, especially if they are being driven by market forces. The cloud depends on reliable, consistent communications. Can the Internet, as it stands today, provide that? Recent as well as historical events demonstrate how easy it is for almost any individual or small group with even minimal know-how to cause major disruptions. The design of the Internet facilitates this. With that in mind, I wonder if the cloud is such a good basket to put all of your eggs in. The hype always emphasises the positive while ignoring the negative. Just think what a good idea Novopay must have sounded like. Some here have also pointed this out. The cloud has a place, but that place is not everywhere.

 



 

Some have also mentioned the frailties of my own way of doing things. Of course local drives can fail and I suppose a house fire would wipe out my digital life completely. These are valid points but, like the cloud itself, they all have to do with risk management. I have backups and some redundancy in my system and I have lost stuff in the past and it was very annoying, but it didn’t mean the end of the world. When I had a business, and we are talking the 1990s and before, I was more careful about backing up some things than others, and using different means of doing that. Every system has vulnerabilities. What matters is the importance you attach to different things, and the risk you are prepared to assume. There is also a psychological factor. If I lose stuff on physical media in my home, the responsibility lies with me. I can live with that. If it just vanishes into the cloud and I haven’t done anything wrong, I find that harder to accept. It is important to me to feel as if I am in control.

 



 

Finally, as someone pointed out, what matters is what works for you. What works for me is the way I have things at the moment. I find it increasingly difficult to keep up with the pace of technological change as I age. I understand less than I used to. What I am afraid of losing, and what I am arguing for here, is the freedom to choose. New is not always better (just think Windows updates).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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