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  # 1796583 8-Jun-2017 12:35
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rb99:

 

Seeing as I'm probably too cheap to pay for Cloudberry, and I saw you quite liked ARQ, I guess that might be worth a try if it'll upload files to Amazon Cloud without actually having to move them - its a better substitute for Amazon Drive Desktop in this case ? My needs a quite simple, probably not to worried about versioning for instance.

 

 

Arq and CloudBerry are both paid products. Arq is US$50, CloudBerry desktop is $30. CloudBerry has a free tier that will backup 200GB no charge.

 

Either will let you backup from any part of your drive to your backup destination.

 

Alternately Duplicati is free, but not sure if it goes to Amazon Drive, and it's not a mirror it's a backup program. You can't directly access files on the cloud drive. Attic and Borg are both command line backup programs that have similar functionality but are more reliable than Duplicati.


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  # 1796595 8-Jun-2017 12:52
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Looks like further proof that I'm not very good at making decisions - Cloudberry does this, ARQ does that, maybe I should try Backblaze or Crashplan, Backblaze seems to be opt-out, Crashplan opt-in.

 

Would you happen to know if Amazon Cloud has storage in Australia or at least fairly local ?

 

Thanks for the info, and for pointing out Cloudberry is $30, I managed to go to the server pricing and thought it was $120.





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  # 1796599 8-Jun-2017 12:58
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rb99:

 

Looks like further proof that I'm not very good at making decisions - Cloudberry does this, ARQ does that, maybe I should try Backblaze or Crashplan, Backblaze seems to be opt-out, Crashplan opt-in.

 

Would you happen to know if Amazon Cloud has storage in Australia or at least fairly local ?

 

Thanks for the info, and for pointing out Cloudberry is $30, I managed to go to the server pricing and thought it was $120.

 

 

"Amazon Cloud" is a bit generic - do you mean "Amazon Drive"? AWS has storage in Sydney, but I don't know if Amazon Drive uses it. S3/Glacier definitely runs there, but they're raw storage not a consumer product. I use the USA regions as they're cheaper than Sydney, and I'm not in a hurry.


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  # 1796618 8-Jun-2017 13:23
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Meant Amazon Drive, thinking sending stuff to AU may be a bit quicker.

 

Thinking (searching for) info on Google isn't worth the trouble. Was just looking at a thread and in that one thread someone says don't use Amazon Drive cos people are saying Amazon locks them out if they try to download lots (like terabytes) of stuff and someone else says don't use Crashplan cos updates often break it.





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  # 1796629 8-Jun-2017 13:45
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Amazon Drive does seem like more of a casual backup service. CrashPlan is good, people are always making stuff up about it, it's been 100% reliable for me for 2-3 years.

 

Are you trying to make your data available in another location, or back it up?

 

If you want an actual backup then you should consider CloudBerry Backup with BackBlaze B2. B2 is easy to set up and is about the cheapest online cloud storage around. S3 is a bit more expensive and is much more complex. I only tried B2 because 10GB is free, but it seems to work well. I back up the same data to S3 as B2.

 

Come to think of it, CloudBerry has a mode that basically mirrors data up to cloud storage as well, but that's not a backup, it's a copy.


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  # 1796739 8-Jun-2017 15:31
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Mostly interested in just having some off site backup. There's nothing particularly critical, and its backup anyway, but its all in the same house (or room actually). Available in another location - not really.

 

 

 

I guess I'll just have to pick something and give it a trial, most likely Cloudberry or Crashplan.





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  # 1796815 8-Jun-2017 16:58
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What you have is copies, not backups. It has to be offsite and incremental to be a backup IMHO.

 

CrashPlan or BackBlaze = easy. CB Backup plus BackBlaze B2 can be made more secure and is cheaper for moderate data volumes.

 

 


 
 
 
 


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  # 1797068 9-Jun-2017 09:09
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No surprise here ... http://www.aftvnews.com/amazon-kills-off-unlimited-storage-plan-for-their-cloud-drive/

 

I think they could see me coming...





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  # 1797072 9-Jun-2017 09:16
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I'm not a fan of unlimited, it relies on averages.

 

1TB in Amazon Drive is US$60 per year. In S3 IA class it's US$150, S3 standard is US$283. So either the Amazon Drive is pricing with the market and losing money, or S3 is making a huge profit.

 

BackBlaze B2 is 1/4 the price of S3 standard, 1/2 the price of S3 IA, and B2 is much less complex to administer / manage.


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  # 1797080 9-Jun-2017 09:35
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I guess with either Backblaze or Crashplan their unlimited ones can disappear at any time (see Amazon) but they are still there for now. Does B2 have any advantage for the boringly average user like me, except I guess I save money (with B2) if I put less than a Terabyte online and 'loose' it with more than a Terabyte. B2 says its 'high performance', don't know if that means anything.





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  # 1797090 9-Jun-2017 09:53
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For most people the complexity of software + self provisioned storage makes CrashPlan or BackBlaze backup services a better option. If your data storage is less than 500GB then it's cheaper first year to use CloudBerry + B2. Once you own the software 1TB is the break even point.

 

For advanced users you get a couple of advantages:

 

  • Because you can prevent deletion of files on the server, or use versioning to allow deletion but retain old data, you're protected against a theoretical virus that specifically targets cloud backup providers like BB/CP. If you put a password on CrashPlan on your PC this gives some protection against the vulnerability, but a virus could still target the service rather than the UI. This is a highly theoretical advantage over a low probability event, verging on paranoia.
  • More flexibility - though CrashPlan is reasonably flexible.
  • Cheaper for smaller data volumes.
  • On-premise software like CloudBerry lets you backup to internal and external disks, giving you a tiered backup solution. CrashPlan does this free for your internal / external disks, but because it verifies the data on a disk every time it's connected it's much slower to run backups.

I'm running CrashPlan, but I've changed to monthly plans, and I plan to turn it off in a few months once I'm 100% happy with CloudBerry and my backup storage on S3. I have archives in Glacier as well, under a different access key.


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  # 1797991 11-Jun-2017 12:45
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Crashplan and Backblaze work at their price points because they control the client. They can throttle data uploads and implement heavy client-side deduplication work to reduce their data storage costs, as well as even delete data unselected from backup sets (crashplan), delete files which haven't existed on the backup'd device for a few months (backblaze), or delete files from external drives not connected in a month (backblaze). Amazon and Google Drive have none of these strategies available. They can do dedup, but only on the server side. They also have stronger requirements for keeping files readily accessable than a pure backup product does, where files may only be accessed on a very rare basis.

 

I use Google Drive personally. I think it will have greater staying power than Amazon Drive, mainly because it's a pure business offering. Google is desperate to get G Suite into the business world, and deplace MS Office. If they have to subsidise Drive unlimited to do so, they will -  they have been doing so since 2012.


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  # 1799156 13-Jun-2017 10:19
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Though I'd have a 'quick' go at Backblaze before maybe Cloudberry and Amazon something/B2. Anyway for the last 3 days its uploaded 28/34/35GB per day. Does this seem reasonable/good/so and so does it twice as fast ? That would be about a month per TB. Am on 100/20 fibre and Backblaze says it can do 157GB/day at 15.5mbits/sec. I guess thats its theoretical fastest or it sends stuff in bursts.





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  # 1799216 13-Jun-2017 11:29
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Deduplication can reduce transmission speed, but it also reduces space and bandwidth requirements.

 

20Mbps is around 200GB per day, or 1TB in 5 days. If it takes a month to do that backup then it's not using near your maximum capacity. That wouldn't be unusual though. I know with CloudBerry and S3/B2 it uploads multiple files in parallel so it can get close to line speed. Keep in mind though, in S3 it would cost US$13 per month for 1TB in S3 IA class, or US$4/month in S3 glacier storage class or directly in Glacier.

 

Around 30GB per day isn't too bad I guess.


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