Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16
13103 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2164

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1851370 23-Aug-2017 16:13
Send private message quote this post

jjnz1:

 

 

 

I am looking at CloudBerry Windows Server licences now along with Amazon Glacier 1TB storage. What has your experience been like? Are you doing full system backups or just certain files or both?

 

I am looking at doing both - a monthly full system (image) backup (160GB Windows drive), and instant (if changes occur) document backups (100GB drive) with versioning. 

 

In your experience, would you recommend CloudBerry?

 

 

I back up files, not system images. CloudBerry works fine for that.

 

Glacier is an archiving solution, it's not particularly suitable for files that you expect to retrieve on a regular basis. Think of it as an automated tape library, which is what it might be. It takes 3-5 hours to restore a file from Glacier to online storage, then download time.

 

S3 IA (infrequent access) class is best for backups IMHO. It's cheaper than S3 standard but more expensive than Glacier, but you have real time access to files. You can actually store objects in S3 in the glacier storage class, which basically takes older files and stores them in glacier. Restore time is still 3-5 hours.

 

CloudBerry has worked well for me, though I've never had to do a big restore I've done test restores.

 

I think I'm actually going to change my daily S3 backup from their de-duplication, encrypted, compressed, incremental backups to a basic sync up to S3. I'll use S3 to provide encryption and version history. I don't care much about compression as most of my volume is uncompressed images and video. I'm considering doing this as I trust AWS more than I trust CloudBerry, if something goes wrong my files are all stored on S3 and can easily be downloaded.





AWS Certified Solution Architect Professional, Sysop Administrator Associate, and Developer Associate
TOGAF certified enterprise architect
Professional photographer


BDFL - Memuneh
58770 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 10171

Administrator
Trusted
Geekzone
Subscriber

  Reply # 1851379 23-Aug-2017 16:39
2 people support this post
Send private message quote this post
 
 
 
 




3479 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 344

Trusted

  Reply # 1851418 23-Aug-2017 18:00
Send private message quote this post

How have you got backblaze going on windows server?




Previously known as psycik

NextPVR/OpenHAB: 
Gigabyte AMD A8 Brix --> Samsung LA46A650D via HDMI, NextPVR,OpenHAB with Aeotech ZWave Controller
Media:Chromecast v2, ATV4, Roku3, Raspberry PI temperature Sensors and Bluetooth LE Sensors,HDHomeRun Dual
Windows 2012 
Host (Plex Server/Crashplan): 2x2TB, 2x3TB, 1x4TB using DriveBender, Samsung 850 evo 512 GB SSD, Hyper-V Server with 1xW10, 1xW2k8, 2xUbuntu 16.04 LTS, Crashplan, NextPVR channel for Plex,NextPVR Metadata Agent and Scanner for Plex


BDFL - Memuneh
58770 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 10171

Administrator
Trusted
Geekzone
Subscriber

  Reply # 1851424 23-Aug-2017 18:12
Send private message quote this post

davidcole: How have you got backblaze going on windows server?

 

You have to use something like Cloudberry or other integration plus B2. The Backblaze client is for desktop only.

 

Also, installed here to see how it goes:

 

 

I have other seven machines (two are servers but only want file backup, as the VMs are already managed by Altaro Backup).





BDFL - Memuneh
58770 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 10171

Administrator
Trusted
Geekzone
Subscriber

  Reply # 1851435 23-Aug-2017 18:40
Send private message quote this post

Looking through my Crashplan account only one machine would need Cloudberry Pro and the two servers would need Cloudberry Server. I am testing it with B2 storage as well now. sounds promising.





2482 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 556

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1851439 23-Aug-2017 18:57
Send private message quote this post

Another one that I have used for about a year is zoolz.com (they have both on demand and cold storage plans)

 

Do a search for zoolz lifetime and you can get some nice deals.  The program polls for changes of files and uploads the changes.

 

Also has version control via the website.

 

 

 

My setup is that I use a mix of services (that I have life time licenses too).  I use pcloud for a network like drive which is encrypted before leaving my machine, I then point zoolz to backup the pcloud mapped drive.
Works well for me.

 

 


333 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 101


  Reply # 1851440 23-Aug-2017 18:58
Send private message quote this post

Stu: I've opted to go with the Small Business offering for the time being. Full price won't kick in until April 2018 so there's plenty of time to see how the current alternatives progress. Migration was easy. Software upgraded itself as part of the process.

 

Did your upgrade go smoothly?

 

My subscription was 'expired' after the upgrade. I had to go through the checkout process to activate my trial just to get backups running again (outside of support hours). My account now says they will be billing me $A33 next month. Hopefully support can get that sorted out, but I expect problems. CrashPlan support hasn't exactly been stellar over the years.

 

Unfortunately, I'm well above the 5TB mark on one PC. That's another $60 wasted increasing my Internet speed for the next two months to complete 20TB of backups. Thanks CrashPlan!

 

Hoping LTO-7 drives will get a bit cheaper with the arrival of LTO-8. It's a huge investment to go to tape, but there seems to be a trend in online storage - imposition of caps on previously 'unlimited' services, if not outright closure. I think I'd be better off just doing a manual backup every few months, as most of my data is static.


13103 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2164

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1851468 23-Aug-2017 19:49
Send private message quote this post

tripp:

 

Another one that I have used for about a year is zoolz.com (they have both on demand and cold storage plans)

 

Do a search for zoolz lifetime and you can get some nice deals.  The program polls for changes of files and uploads the changes.

 

 

 

 

I'm not sure I trust places that have deals or do "lifetime" cheap. Storage, servers, networking, costs money. If they're doing lots of deals they may be relying on a constant stream of new subscribers to pay the bills.

 

Their free plan is 75GB, which is $0.52 per month on AWS. Multiply that by a million users and you're paying half a million dollars a month with no additional revenue.

 

Their starter plan, 500GB hot 100GB cold, costs $6.65 a month on AWS and they charge $20 a month. That's a steep mark up to add a nice interface, but may be sustainable.

 

I lost data to a very early "free online storage" vendor about 20 years ago. Z Drive or something, I think.





AWS Certified Solution Architect Professional, Sysop Administrator Associate, and Developer Associate
TOGAF certified enterprise architect
Professional photographer


Stu

Hammered
4716 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 941

Moderator
Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1851473 23-Aug-2017 19:56
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

SirHumphreyAppleby:

 

Stu: I've opted to go with the Small Business offering for the time being. Full price won't kick in until April 2018 so there's plenty of time to see how the current alternatives progress. Migration was easy. Software upgraded itself as part of the process.

 

Did your upgrade go smoothly?

 

 

Yes, no problems at all (knock on wood). Only one computer to migrate and less than 1TB of data. Thankfully I didn't get around to setting up their family account (I think it's up to five computers?), which was the plan this year. 





Keep calm, and carry on posting.

 

 

 

Click to see full size Click to see full size


'That VDSL Cat'
6431 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1230

Trusted
Spark
Subscriber

  Reply # 1851490 23-Aug-2017 20:19
Send private message quote this post

First looks into Backblaze, is certainly a different take on things.

 

 

 

I'm not quite a fan of the Must backup whole drives situation, Obviously i could go via a 3rd party client and B2 however.

 

Glad it is smart enough not to backup network drives by default, i came back from dinner with it wanting to upload a mare 9TB... my poor connections...

 

 

 

I may stick with Crashplan until i've improved my upstream to a stage that i'd be happy to start from scratch and upload EVERYTHING (excluding steam etc)

 

 

 

Alternatively, i could go B2, and likely drop my backup sizes a fair amount as there is actually more of a selected subset of data i keep stored.





#include <std_disclaimer>

 

Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.


270 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 56

Subscriber

  Reply # 1851507 23-Aug-2017 20:46
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Yeah, pretty annoyed at this as I signed up for the family option so that I could install it for others and know that there was at least some sort of regular back-up being done. I know you can't rely on just one form, but one is better than none.  So have signed for Backblaze, using the Geekzone referral code, so we shall see if that is a good option.  So far, not so good.  The indicative upload speed is 2 GB day and I am on 200/200 fibre! With 2 TB to back up, well, the maths don't look great at all. The whole reason I got the 200/200 fibre option was to enable fast upstream backups to the cloud. Maybe over-night when I am not using my iMac, things will improve. But if not, I will need to re-think my backup strategy. I know it took ages to do the original Crashplan backup - 5 weeks maybe - but once it was done, it has been pretty painless since. 2 GB a day upload is a simply not acceptable; even more so if download/restore speeds are similar.  Sigh.





Tinshed
Wellington, New Zealand


13103 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2164

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1851511 23-Aug-2017 20:52
Send private message quote this post

It sounds like a lot of people are using a cloud backup program as their main or sole backup. That's not a great plan. In my opinion everyone should have a backup program doing incremental backups, with everything going to an external disk you store offsite, and a subset of that going to a cloud backup.

 

For example, I have at least 1TB of RAW and video files, personal and professional, spanning ten years. I have them on my PC, on a disk in my shed, and a disk at work. Why would they need to be backed up in the cloud? They don't, they're on three disks in two locations. On those disks I also have RAW versions, and on Glacier I have medium sized jpeg versions to fight format obsolescence. Pretty sure I have DNG somewhere as well.

 

I also have a backups folder, things like system images, most of that doesn't need to go to the cloud either. Neither does things like my music collection, which are largely static.

 

What I backup to the cloud is recent images (past few months that aren't offsite yet), documents, and financials.

 

That won't suit everyone, but I think the strategy of everything on disk, key stuff in cloud would make cloud backups viable for more people.





AWS Certified Solution Architect Professional, Sysop Administrator Associate, and Developer Associate
TOGAF certified enterprise architect
Professional photographer


Amanzi
805 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 46

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1851514 23-Aug-2017 20:57
Send private message quote this post

I'm switching to the small business account for now and removing devices that I don't really need backed up. It will be free for the next two months and then US$10 per month until October 2018. After that it will be US$40 per month but I'll find a replacement before then.


270 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 56

Subscriber

  Reply # 1851526 23-Aug-2017 21:13
2 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

timmmay:

 

It sounds like a lot of people are using a cloud backup program as their main or sole backup. That's not a great plan. In my opinion everyone should have a backup program doing incremental backups, with everything going to an external disk you store offsite, and a subset of that going to a cloud backup.

 

For example, I have at least 1TB of RAW and video files, personal and professional, spanning ten years. I have them on my PC, on a disk in my shed, and a disk at work. Why would they need to be backed up in the cloud? They don't, they're on three disks in two locations. On those disks I also have RAW versions, and on Glacier I have medium sized jpeg versions to fight format obsolescence. Pretty sure I have DNG somewhere as well.

 

I also have a backups folder, things like system images, most of that doesn't need to go to the cloud either. Neither does things like my music collection, which are largely static.

 

What I backup to the cloud is recent images (past few months that aren't offsite yet), documents, and financials.

 

That won't suit everyone, but I think the strategy of everything on disk, key stuff in cloud would make cloud backups viable for more people.

 

 

 

 

I get this, and I certainly follow a similar regime for myself of having multiple layers of backup. Maybe I am backing up too much to the cloud in addition to other places/devices, i.e. Time Machine and disk cloning via Carbon Copy Cloner.  And this without mentioning any of the "sync" options I use such as iCloud or Dropbox.  But for the issues faced by the average non-geek user are very different.  In my experience they don't even want to think about this and their eyes glaze over so quickly when you start to discuss backup strategies.  They want simple, no fuss, no bother. Maybe their expectations can't be met, by the advantage of something like Crashplan, and maybe Backblaze, is that it takes away all of that complexity and provides at least some form of backup, and peace of mind.  Not sure what the answer is, but expecting the average user to implement and manage a multi-layered backup strategy is simply not gonna happen. I mean, who hasn't had this experience: User: "Where is my file?", Me: "What folder did you save it in?" User, "How would I know? Where is my file?"





Tinshed
Wellington, New Zealand


13103 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2164

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1851531 23-Aug-2017 21:18
Send private message quote this post

Tinshed:

 

I get this, and I certainly follow a similar regime for myself of having multiple layers of backup. Maybe I am backing up too much to the cloud in addition to other places/devices, i.e. Time Machine and disk cloning via Carbon Copy Cloner.  And this without mentioning any of the "sync" options I use such as iCloud or Dropbox.  But for the issues faced by the average non-geek user are very different.  In my experience they don't even want to think about this and their eyes glaze over so quickly when you start to discuss backup strategies.  They want simple, no fuss, no bother. Maybe their expectations can't be met, by the advantage of something like Crashplan, and maybe Backblaze, is that it takes away all of that complexity and provides at least some form of backup, and peace of mind.  Not sure what the answer is, but expecting the average user to implement and manage a multi-layered backup strategy is simply not gonna happen. I mean, who hasn't had this experience: User: "Where is my file?", Me: "What folder did you save it in?" User, "How would I know? Where is my file?"

 

 

Yeah agreed about the average user. That's why CrashPlan was good, and why BackBlaze is an acceptable substitute at best. Maybe someone should look at other online backup providers that do better versioning - I have a review of a few on one of my websites, but I don't much need them as I roll my own.





AWS Certified Solution Architect Professional, Sysop Administrator Associate, and Developer Associate
TOGAF certified enterprise architect
Professional photographer


1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16
Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Intel unveils the 8th Gen Intel Core Processor family for desktop
Posted 25-Sep-2017 19:45


Chow brothers plan to invest NZ$100 million in technology
Posted 24-Sep-2017 16:24


Symantec protects data everywhere with Information Centric Security
Posted 21-Sep-2017 15:33


FUJIFILM introduces X-E3 mirrorless camera with wireless connectivity
Posted 18-Sep-2017 13:53


Vodafone announces new plans with bigger data bundles
Posted 15-Sep-2017 10:51


Skinny launches phone with support for te reo Maori
Posted 14-Sep-2017 08:39


If Vodafone dropping mail worries you, you’re doing online wrong
Posted 11-Sep-2017 13:54


Vodafone New Zealand deploy live 400 gigabit system
Posted 11-Sep-2017 11:07


OPPO camera phones now available at PB Tech
Posted 11-Sep-2017 09:56


Norton Wi-Fi Privacy — Easy, flawed VPN
Posted 11-Sep-2017 09:48


Lenovo reveals new ThinkPad A Series
Posted 8-Sep-2017 14:37


Huawei passes Apple for the first time to capture the second spot globally
Posted 8-Sep-2017 10:45


Vodafone initiative enhances te reo Maori pronunciation on Google Maps
Posted 8-Sep-2017 10:40


Voyager Internet expand local internet phone services company with Conversant acquisition
Posted 6-Sep-2017 18:27


NOW Expands in to Tauranga
Posted 5-Sep-2017 18:16



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.