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237 posts

Master Geek
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Topic # 233759 1-May-2018 14:03
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I have a subscription with Pluralsight and I'm having difficulty knowing/finding appropriate Azure courses to start with as an absolute beginner. The Managing Infrastructure with Microsoft Azure seems like a possible starting point but seems like it may be a step higher than the very basics? https://app.pluralsight.com/library/courses/managing-infrastructure-microsoft-azure-getting-started/table-of-contents 

 

I have a general understanding of what Azure is and is capable of but I need to start with the very basics. Can anyone suggest a learning path or particular course that would be suitable to start with? I understand that most of Azure management is done from within the Azure portal with a subscription, is that correct? Cheers. smile

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 2006010 1-May-2018 14:10
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You can spin up VMs for a 30 day period free if you wanted to have a behind the scenes play (its what those pesky east-asian countries do to send spam or do blackhat SEO now) before it hits the subscribe and gimme creditcard killswitch




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Master Geek
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  Reply # 2006025 1-May-2018 14:33
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Oblivian:

 

You can spin up VMs for a 30 day period free if you wanted to have a behind the scenes play (its what those pesky east-asian countries do to send spam or do blackhat SEO now) before it hits the subscribe and gimme creditcard killswitch

 

 

 

 

I'm aware of the 30 day free period, I'm looking for suitable courses to learn it. There is tons of resources available but knowing where to start is the hard part. The Azure websites learning paths could be a start. https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/training/learning-paths/

 

Doesn't surprise me scammers would take advantage of such a thing. undecided 

 

 


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  Reply # 2006037 1-May-2018 14:46
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You'll have to hunt in Pluralsight for 'Azure Fundamentals' or something.

 

You can sign up for a free Azure trial, you do need to provide your credit card, but it doesn't get charged for anything unless you want to keep the subscription after the trial and deliberately remove the spending limit.

 

Definitely keep your playground separate from anything in production, poor decisions can haunt you in Azure.

 

You should ask here if a Geekzone member local to you could spend a couple of hours getting you started.

 

This is what I would learn about first:

 

* Azure AD

 

* The great mysteries of networking in Azure (Virtual Networks, Gateway Subnets, Virtual Network Gateways, Connections, VPN etc)

 

* The difference between a machine which is 'shut down', and one that is 'off'

 

* IAM and Resource Groups

 

 

 

Again, if you can get a fellow human to get you started it's way easier than going it alone.

 

 

 

 

 

 








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  Reply # 2006053 1-May-2018 15:08
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We get $100 credit a month for Azure, from everything I can see that wouldn't even get us the most basic of Windows Servers ? 

 

I find the whole thing crazy confusing. 

 

 




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Master Geek
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  Reply # 2006073 1-May-2018 15:32
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networkn:

 

We get $100 credit a month for Azure, from everything I can see that wouldn't even get us the most basic of Windows Servers ? 

 

I find the whole thing crazy confusing. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So what do you do with your credit? Do you not have an Azure subscription?


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  Reply # 2006088 1-May-2018 15:48
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networkn:

 

We get $100 credit a month for Azure, from everything I can see that wouldn't even get us the most basic of Windows Servers ? 

 

I find the whole thing crazy confusing. 

 

 

 

 

US$? Do you to about a single core 4.5G RAM 50G storage/month by $2

 

https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/pricing/calculator/

 

 


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  Reply # 2006116 1-May-2018 16:13
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Oblivian:

 

networkn:

 

We get $100 credit a month for Azure, from everything I can see that wouldn't even get us the most basic of Windows Servers ? 

 

I find the whole thing crazy confusing. 

 

 

 

 

US$? Do you to about a single core 4.5G RAM 50G storage/month by $2

 

https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/pricing/calculator/

 

 

 

 

Considering the last time I built a server with only 4GB of memory was maybe 15 years ago, that doesn't seem huge! Wouldn't leave a lot of operating space to operate any apps on top of it?

 

 


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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 2006363 2-May-2018 07:42
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networkn:

 

Considering the last time I built a server with only 4GB of memory was maybe 15 years ago, that doesn't seem huge! Wouldn't leave a lot of operating space to operate any apps on top of it?

 

 

$100 per month wont get you a lot in terms of IaaS, but you could do something useful with PaaS.

 

For example, $100 would get you about 2 billion load balanced Traffic Manager queries per month if you were doing global web hosting or something.

 

 










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Master Geek
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  Reply # 2033918 11-Jun-2018 20:45
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Would it be possible to become qualified in Microsoft Azure and to work with Azure purely by learning the Microsoft cloud certifications? I know that MS Server and Active Directory are a big part of Azure, would it be ideal to learn the old fashioned way of MS server and Active Directory before getting into Azure or to go straight into learning Azure Server and Azure Active Directory? Keep in mind I have no prior training in either Server or Active directory. I have been going through some of the standard (non Azure) Server courses like 70-740 but I am not exactly sure if this is a prerequisite to using MS Server with Azure.


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  Reply # 2033952 11-Jun-2018 21:17
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AWS / Azure pricing is similar.

 

On AWS my low volume but very responsive web server running five websites is 512MB RAM / 5% of a core (t2.nano) running LAMP with 512MB virtual memory, 10GB of disk and snapshots for backups. Cost me about US$5 per month. On top of that I have  (guessing here) maybe 25GB of S3 storage, 75GB of Glacier archival storage, and other bits and bobs. Runs me $9/month. So it's useful for personal stuff, not so much for business running enterprise workloads.

 

 

 

Kol12:

 

Would it be possible to become qualified in Microsoft Azure and to work with Azure purely by learning the Microsoft cloud certifications? I know that MS Server and Active Directory are a big part of Azure, would it be ideal to learn the old fashioned way of MS server and Active Directory before getting into Azure or to go straight into learning Azure Server and Azure Active Directory? Keep in mind I have no prior training in either Server or Active directory. I have been going through some of the standard (non Azure) Server courses like 70-740 but I am not exactly sure if this is a prerequisite to using MS Server with Azure.

 

 

Azure is an in demand skill, but I think you would need a good general Microsoft background like AD and general technical knowledge. I do mostly AWS but also do a bit of Azure (at a very high / abstract / architectural level where others fill in implementation details).





AWS Certified Solution Architect Professional, Sysop Administrator Associate, and Developer Associate
TOGAF certified enterprise architect
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Master Geek
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  Reply # 2033969 11-Jun-2018 21:35
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timmmay:

 

Kol12:

 

Would it be possible to become qualified in Microsoft Azure and to work with Azure purely by learning the Microsoft cloud certifications? I know that MS Server and Active Directory are a big part of Azure, would it be ideal to learn the old fashioned way of MS server and Active Directory before getting into Azure or to go straight into learning Azure Server and Azure Active Directory? Keep in mind I have no prior training in either Server or Active directory. I have been going through some of the standard (non Azure) Server courses like 70-740 but I am not exactly sure if this is a prerequisite to using MS Server with Azure.

 

 

Azure is an in demand skill, but I think you would need a good general Microsoft background like AD and general technical knowledge. I do mostly AWS but also do a bit of Azure (at a very high / abstract / architectural level where others fill in implementation details).

 

 

 

 

I figured Azure would be valuable to learn. Perhaps I can hop between the traditional Server and AD courses to pick up anything that may be needed for the Azure courses. Do you work as a AWS Certified Solution Architect Professional yourself? What do you do a lot of? What sort of clients do you have? 


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  Reply # 2034067 12-Jun-2018 07:43
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Kol12:

 

I figured Azure would be valuable to learn. Perhaps I can hop between the traditional Server and AD courses to pick up anything that may be needed for the Azure courses. Do you work as a AWS Certified Solution Architect Professional yourself? What do you do a lot of? What sort of clients do you have? 

 

 

I work as an architect for a consulting firm in Wellington, not currently AWS specific, though hopefully soon I'll move onto some AWS work. There's not a lot of AWS in government yet, but it's growing. There's a lot more Azure as Microsoft was the incumbent, everyone uses Microsoft OS and usually lots of other software so they had a foot in the door. Getting work in AWS is tricky, even with my qualifications and years of architecture experience it's taken a lot of time. It tends to be done by people in-house who get trained.

 

AWS is a nicer system, technically better IMHO, more advanced, more consistent, better documented. Azure is probably a better option if you want to get work in Cloud in Wellington. Auckland I think there's more AWS but there will be plenty of Azure there I bet.





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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 2034079 12-Jun-2018 08:03
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Kol12:

 

I figured Azure would be valuable to learn. Perhaps I can hop between the traditional Server and AD courses to pick up anything that may be needed for the Azure courses.

 

 

This is a good idea, a lot of the success of Azure is down to the ability to extend existing Microsoft enterprise environments into the cloud, which of course requires a solid understanding of on premises technology. You'd struggle to find many large scale green field Azure implementations in NZ (probably the same for AWS too really).

 

 

 

 








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  Reply # 2034126 12-Jun-2018 08:51
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networkn:

 

Considering the last time I built a server with only 4GB of memory was maybe 15 years ago, that doesn't seem huge! Wouldn't leave a lot of operating space to operate any apps on top of it?

 

 

 

 

You need to stop thinking in terms of individual servers and in terms of cloud. As pointed out simply moving your VMs from a local hypervisor to Azure isn't terribly efficient in terms of their offerings. Instead look at what you can build with their platform away from the traditional thought of deploy VM to host service.


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  Reply # 2034134 12-Jun-2018 09:02
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timmmay:

 

Kol12:

 

I figured Azure would be valuable to learn. Perhaps I can hop between the traditional Server and AD courses to pick up anything that may be needed for the Azure courses. Do you work as a AWS Certified Solution Architect Professional yourself? What do you do a lot of? What sort of clients do you have? 

 

 

I work as an architect for a consulting firm in Wellington, not currently AWS specific, though hopefully soon I'll move onto some AWS work. There's not a lot of AWS in government yet, but it's growing. There's a lot more Azure as Microsoft was the incumbent, everyone uses Microsoft OS and usually lots of other software so they had a foot in the door. Getting work in AWS is tricky, even with my qualifications and years of architecture experience it's taken a lot of time. It tends to be done by people in-house who get trained.

 

AWS is a nicer system, technically better IMHO, more advanced, more consistent, better documented. Azure is probably a better option if you want to get work in Cloud in Wellington. Auckland I think there's more AWS but there will be plenty of Azure there I bet.

 

 

Another reason for Microsoft's foothold in government is the "all of government" licensing deal. This makes it pretty compelling to use as most government organisations are already licenced for the EMS suite and O365 so it's a natural progression to continue with Azure. What I have seen organisations use AWS for more and more is DEV Test workloads as the IaaS pricing on AWS is seen to be cheaper than that offered by Microsoft. The good thing is it's pretty easy to use both and lean on your investment in Azure AD as your identity source across both platforms.

 

 





When you live your life on Twitter and Facebook, and are only friends with like minded people on Twitter and Facebook, you are not living in the real world. You are living in a narcissistic echo chamber.

 


My thoughts are my own and are in no way representative of my employer.


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