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  Reply # 732067 13-Dec-2012 14:46
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There are lots of options if you want to go micro 4/3. The GH2/3 are awesome for video, but there are others that are more focused on stills. Panasonic, Olympus, and maybe Fuji are the biggest players, from memory.




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  Reply # 732080 13-Dec-2012 15:14
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You might call the others more focused on stills, but I wouldn't say they're *better* than the GH2/3.

You'd be hard pressed to point out still photography benefits for the newbie in the real world that they'd have over the GH series, the only significant benefit I'd say a camera such as the Panasonic G5 brings is a slightly cheaper price. But when the GH2 is already so cheap then I think it is worthwhile the little extra for it as in return you are getting top notch professional level quality video gear.

(as while video is probably not a top priority for him, it is at least a "nice to have" for most people. However, if he is 100% certain he will NEVER want video capabilities then for sure he should consider the Panasonic G5 and the others. But I doubt any of us can see with that certainty into the future, so why not "just in case" you later change your mind and desire to make a few videos?).




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  Reply # 732084 13-Dec-2012 15:15
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Yeah the GH2 is probably still good at stills, I think the newer cameras just have better high ISO performance and sometimes slightly better focus systems.




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  Reply # 732103 13-Dec-2012 15:48
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Don't be fooled into thinking Panasonic's GH series isn't good at stills just because of all the massive hype about their video capabilities!

As after all they primarily built the GH3 (and before it the GH2) as their top of the line digital stills camera.

The reason why I recommend the GH2 over the GH3 is that the GH3 only just came out, so is quite pricey, while the GH2 has come down in price to the point it is an incredibly good deal.

As he is posting here asking for advice I can reasonably deduce "value for money" is a concern for him, otherwise he would just splash out and buy whatever the showman recommends to him if price isn't a concern, however if money means nothing to you.... get the Leica X2!! ha.

For a beginner I doubt the significant difference in price between the GH2 and GH3 will be made up by real life performance. By the time he learns all the ins and outs of his camera and how to properly do photography so that he is pushing his GH2 to the extreme limits such that he desires something better like the GH3 I bet by then the GH6 will be out and down to a reasonable price!

Even for myself, who is enrolled in a Diploma of Digital Film, I am planning on getting the GH2 over the GH3 (or maybe even the GH1, as the total cost for basic equipment for videos is much higher than for photography. Although of course at the high end for both video and photography the sky is the limit!). As the very significant extra cost for a GH3 is just not worth it, but in a year or so I will hopefully get the GH3 (I should have more cash, and the price will have gone down) and my first camera will be a very useful B Camera for filming. Even for digital still photography having a second body is very useful, such as when covering an event to change lenses you don't have to physically switch it but just grab the other body with it already attached.




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  Reply # 732279 13-Dec-2012 21:32
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timmmay: There are lots of options if you want to go micro 4/3. The GH2/3 are awesome for video, but there are others that are more focused on stills. Panasonic, Olympus, and maybe Fuji are the biggest players, from memory.


Fuji's interchangeable lens cameras are not m4/3. As far as I recall they use an APS-C sized sensor.

All of the major Japanese manufacturers now have some sort of mirrorless interchangeable lens offering, but as far as I'm aware Panasonic and Olympus are the only ones with a common system.

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  Reply # 732305 13-Dec-2012 22:47
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As to the original question.
60D type camera is not overkill, as long as you know what you are going for.

My 400D was pretty much my first ever camera, just easy to learn from the start and go for it

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  Reply # 736443 22-Dec-2012 22:50
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I am in the same boat as well
hunting for my first dslr
choosing between canon 600d nikon d3200 & d5100
I am more leaning towards nikon 5100d

any recommendation on whether I should just get a 18-55mm kit lense or the twin lenses or 18-135mm?




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  Reply # 736446 22-Dec-2012 23:09
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wanghou168: I am in the same boat as well
hunting for my first dslr
choosing between canon 600d nikon d3200 & d5100
I am more leaning towards nikon 5100d

any recommendation on whether I should just get a 18-55mm kit lense or the twin lenses or 18-135mm?


I would say go for the widest range that you can get. Play around with that range and see if there are shots you cannot get. Research why you can not get these shots.
Decide whether upgrading the lens will help you get the shot(probably it wont). Research again why your shot sucked.
If then legitimately the lens sucked for your purpose, be prepared to spend lots of money.

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  Reply # 736496 23-Dec-2012 08:43
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i personally went with the twin lens kit. but i hardly use the 55-250mm lens. I think you might get more use out of the 18-135mm lens.

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  Reply # 736503 23-Dec-2012 09:39
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I get far more use out of wide lenses than long lenses for family and holiday photos. The longest lens I ever take on holiday is 70mm on full frame, which is 55mm on a crop body. I've almost never wanted longer. I use a 16mm lens, which is similar to 10mm on full frame.




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  Reply # 736510 23-Dec-2012 10:04
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If you're just getting into SLR photography, why not get a used DSLR off trademe? Any Canon or Nikon kit with 6+ megapixels released in the past 4 years will be decent. Depreciation on a DSLR body is pretty steep, let the first owner take the hit. Most of the DSLRs on trademe have very low shutter counts for their age.

All will have the P, S, A, M modes that you'd need. The only real difference in the prosumer models is the ease of access to these functions - the lower ends models will be geared towards those who leave it on auto most of the time; whereas the higher end models will have dedicated dials, buttons, and switches.

If you save on the body, you can invest in a decent (non-kit) lens.

Edit: I forgot to mention viewfinder coverage - the higher end models have the best (usually 100%) viewfinder coverage, whereas the lower end models might have 94% or something.




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  Reply # 736517 23-Dec-2012 10:48
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doublehell: All will have the P, S, A, M modes that you'd need. The only real difference in the prosumer models is the ease of access to these functions - the lower ends models will be geared towards those who leave it on auto most of the time; whereas the higher end models will have dedicated dials, buttons, and switches.


In my experience there is huge benefit in having dedicated controls for all commonly used functions. When you're in a high pressure situation fumbling around with various buttons just isn't an option.

Also, the higher end bodies have much better durability and weather sealing. The lack of weather sealing is the only thing that might motivate me to upgrade my D90 which is otherwise an excellent camera.

Edit: I forgot to mention viewfinder coverage - the higher end models have the best (usually 100%) viewfinder coverage, whereas the lower end models might have 94% or something.


Yes, a pentaprism viewfinder is much more pleasant to use than the pentamirror type found in cheaper bodies.

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  Reply # 737028 24-Dec-2012 23:49
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I have a 650D and am loving it. The body does not matter all that much. You can get a better image from a 650D with it's cropped sensor and a $2000 lens than a 5D Mk 3 with full frame sensor and kit lens.

650D is a great beginner to intermediate camera with all the bells and whistles that the pros will use.

Glass will never expire. Invest in a great lens and look after it. Upgrade the body when your bank account will allow you.

I personally make up for a lot of the pit falls of the 650D in PhotoShop and after effects.

Good luck.





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  Reply # 737059 25-Dec-2012 08:15
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i just read somewhere about pixel density and body-lens sharpness ... that a cropsensor - any lens combo will not reach 18MP sharpness ... and was true!

i was complaining that my 18MP 600D gives blur pictures with my lenses (canon 50mm 1.8, sigma 18-250mm: the canon is supposed to be sharp, the sigma is supposed to be soft by nature)

but now i take pics at 8MP normal (not fine/superfine) and the pics are sharp as!

i used to take in raw and didn't enjoy it coz 1) i'm crap at processing compared to digic 4 (the only reason i do raw now would be for white balancing) 2) i hate processing thousands of stuff even with adobe camera raw - i'm more of a fast food person heh heh

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  Reply # 737102 25-Dec-2012 10:21
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I have the Canon 60D,
I recommend you buy other lenses when you have the money as I'm not really fussed on the standard lens they come with (slow focus)

Mine came with the 18-135 and I prefer to use my EF-S 60mm f/2.8 for any portrait or close up shots

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