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  Reply # 1208728 5-Jan-2015 19:40
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timmmay: I found the 17-55 inconsistent to focus on the 7D mk1. I also owned three, dropped and broke two - they're fragile. Don't drop them.


Ouch!

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  Reply # 1208747 5-Jan-2015 20:07
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Upgrading camera bodies will likely give marginal improvements.




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  Reply # 1208752 5-Jan-2015 20:14
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I haven't had many issues focusing with my canon cameras.

I use ai-servo probably 90% of the time, no matter if it is landscapes,portraits or action shots. I also always use one of the back buttons to focus, not the shutter button.
Only time I use manual focus is with macro shots or shots using a telescope, but that is a whole different and specific set of uses.
I sometimes use one-shot focus on landscapes if I'm using a tripod.

For exposure I'm using Av probably 80% of the time while manually adjusting iso.
I tend to use M for macro,astro (or bulb), flash stuff, and landscapes if I'm doing a pano/hdr



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  Reply # 1208768 5-Jan-2015 20:24
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I personally only ever use P on my mode dial. The only exception would be, as Timmay suggests, using M for flash photography where it's useful to set the aperture to control depth of field, the shutter speed to control ambient light, and let the flash do the rest.

The problem with A or S modes is that there's always a risk that you select a shutter speed for which there is no available aperture to achieve correct exposure, or vice versa. It can easily happen if you're shooting under pressure. P still allows you to rebalance the shutter speed and aperture without any risk of straying outside the boundaries of correct exposure.

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  Reply # 1208799 5-Jan-2015 21:24
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you have 3 issues

1) exposure. don't use M unless everything isn't moving and you have lots of time and you are willing to do a few test shots to "see". example: a night exposure shot.
if you want to shoot something still use Av. set aperture to adjust your depth of field. if you want more things in focus use f/8-f/11. if you only want most things blur us f/2.8
if you want to shoot something moving use Tv. if moving toddler pace 1/125. if a bird use 1/1000. scooter is something in between say 1/250

2) focus points. your camera has a cross-type focus point in the centre only. use only centre point unless you want to give it a few goes. take a few shots.

3) the scooter .... it's very hard to shoot the scooter as an beginner and a dslr. an iphone will give you a better result ... but if you insist on a dslr you have 3 options
- stand far away so the guy will always stay in focus using AI Servo
- stnad very near - prefocus using manual focus and keep shooting lots using Tv you are bound to get one or two in focus
- use iphone or use P and set f/8 and 1/125 and cross your fingers

happy learning

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  Reply # 1208806 5-Jan-2015 21:43
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joker97: 3) the scooter .... it's very hard to shoot the scooter as an beginner and a dslr. an iphone will give you a better result ...


Huh? For a fast moving subject you will be cranking up the sensitivity and the tiny sensor in the iPhone will be hopeless for this. Not to mention the autofocus in the iPhone doesn't use the phase detection sensors necessary for tracking a moving subject accurately.

The iPhone camera works okay with a still subject in perfect lighting conditions. For anything else it's useless. A quick glance at Facebook proves this.

TLD

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  Reply # 1208828 5-Jan-2015 22:20
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Yes, I think you'd be much better off with a 70D over a 600D, but this needs some qualification.  From a purely image quality point of view, the difference is minor, but the 70D's much better spec means you'll nail more keepers in more difficult shooting situations, and at a much fast rate.  Google Canon 70D vs 600D to see what I mean

http://snapsort.com/compare/Canon-600d-vs-Canon-EOS-70D

http://cameradecision.com/compare/Canon-EOS-600D-vs-Canon-EOS-70D

Double the number of focus points (19 vs 9)
Way less shutter lag (75ms vs 283ms)  If there is one thing DSLR users hate about using compacts, it's the shutter lag.  A quarter second does not sound much, but I promise you'd notice and miss shots because of it.
Faster frame rate (7fps vs 3.7fps)
Double the battery life.
Higher max ISO (one stop) and lower noise.
Higher max shutter speed (1/8000th vs 1/4000th)
Much better for shooting video with its phase detection auto focus.  The 600D has no AF with video.  The 70D also has a stereo microphone, but both have external mic sockets which you should use.

I've had no experience with touch screens on cameras, and can't image ever using a finger to select the focus point as compared to focus and recompose, so we'll call that a sales gimmick unless anyone knows better?

The weather sealing is definite plus though, and also an indication of a more serious camera.

The bottom line is that you should not believe folk who say the camera body makes no difference, and a good photographer can take equally good pictures with any camera if they use the same lens.  I have processed thousands of images taken by second shooters working with me, and the only camera body that has consistently matched my 1D cameras is the Canon 5D in all its variations. 

You have two camera club options around central Christchurch.  The Christchurch Photographic Society is the main one:
http://www.cpsnz.com/home/index.php#9

I see they have a Photo Walk scheduled for the Kite Festival at New Brighton beach on the 24th Jan.

If you are more into Natural History then there is the Nature Photography Society also based in Christchurch
http://www.naturephotography.org.nz/default.aspx

People can and do belong to both of course.








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  Reply # 1208860 5-Jan-2015 23:04
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Please don't start up with this automatic get better gear stuff.

A 600D with a 17-55 f2.8 is perfectly fine for 99% of an amateur photographers shot (if it's in that focal range)

Practice using the different focus modes. (One-shot, Ai-servo etc)
Try using a focus button other than the shutter button(back of camera * ) opens up a range of opportunities.
Make sure you understand how iso/shutter/aperture work together. 
Practice panning with ai-servo for moving shots.

There might be a chance that the lens/camera is faulty, so if you can get someone a bit more experienced to check it out. 

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Reply # 1208862 5-Jan-2015 23:08
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timmmay: Upgrading camera bodies will likely give marginal improvements.


Unless you move to Nikon, of course...! ;-)





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  Reply # 1208891 6-Jan-2015 03:01
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alasta:
joker97: 3) the scooter .... it's very hard to shoot the scooter as an beginner and a dslr. an iphone will give you a better result ...


Huh? For a fast moving subject you will be cranking up the sensitivity and the tiny sensor in the iPhone will be hopeless for this. Not to mention the autofocus in the iPhone doesn't use the phase detection sensors necessary for tracking a moving subject accurately.

The iPhone camera works okay with a still subject in perfect lighting conditions. For anything else it's useless. A quick glance at Facebook proves this.


completely disagree. i reckon its focus speed is as good as any decent mirrorless on the market. and they by far outnumber dSLRs. infinite contrast detection focus points with facial recognition vs 9 small points of phase detection comparatively very shallow DOF (larger sensor and a f/2.8 lens!) means chances of nailing focus on an iphone is much much greater than on a 600D by a beginner. 

Iphone has a nearly infinite depth of field thanks to its small sensor. Everything is in focus. ISO 100 image is perfectly printable. Try it.

PS a quick search found these action shots

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  Reply # 1208892 6-Jan-2015 03:07
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TLD: Yes, I think you'd be much better off with a 70D over a 600D, but this needs some qualification.  From a purely image quality point of view, the difference is minor, but the 70D's much better spec means you'll nail more keepers in more difficult shooting situations, and at a much fast rate.  Google Canon 70D vs 600D to see what I mean

http://snapsort.com/compare/Canon-600d-vs-Canon-EOS-70D

http://cameradecision.com/compare/Canon-EOS-600D-vs-Canon-EOS-70D

Double the number of focus points (19 vs 9)
Way less shutter lag (75ms vs 283ms)  If there is one thing DSLR users hate about using compacts, it's the shutter lag.  A quarter second does not sound much, but I promise you'd notice and miss shots because of it.
Faster frame rate (7fps vs 3.7fps)
Double the battery life.
Higher max ISO (one stop) and lower noise.
Higher max shutter speed (1/8000th vs 1/4000th)
Much better for shooting video with its phase detection auto focus.  The 600D has no AF with video.  The 70D also has a stereo microphone, but both have external mic sockets which you should use.

I've had no experience with touch screens on cameras, and can't image ever using a finger to select the focus point as compared to focus and recompose, so we'll call that a sales gimmick unless anyone knows better?

The weather sealing is definite plus though, and also an indication of a more serious camera.

The bottom line is that you should not believe folk who say the camera body makes no difference, and a good photographer can take equally good pictures with any camera if they use the same lens.  I have processed thousands of images taken by second shooters working with me, and the only camera body that has consistently matched my 1D cameras is the Canon 5D in all its variations. 

You have two camera club options around central Christchurch.  The Christchurch Photographic Society is the main one:
http://www.cpsnz.com/home/index.php#9

I see they have a Photo Walk scheduled for the Kite Festival at New Brighton beach on the 24th Jan.

If you are more into Natural History then there is the Nature Photography Society also based in Christchurch
http://www.naturephotography.org.nz/default.aspx

People can and do belong to both of course.






If one can't understand nailing focus point, depth of field - aperture interdependence, shutter speed - motion blur interdependence, ISO and noise, subject / perspective / composition, lighting / shadows and dynamic range, you can give them your 1DX and I will get better pictures with a 350D +/- clever post processing.

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  Reply # 1208893 6-Jan-2015 03:20
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Raikyn: Please don't start up with this automatic get better gear stuff.

A 600D with a 17-55 f2.8 is perfectly fine for 99% of an amateur photographers shot (if it's in that focal range)

Practice using the different focus modes. (One-shot, Ai-servo etc)
Try using a focus button other than the shutter button(back of camera * ) opens up a range of opportunities.
Make sure you understand how iso/shutter/aperture work together. 
Practice panning with ai-servo for moving shots.

There might be a chance that the lens/camera is faulty, so if you can get someone a bit more experienced to check it out. 


Better body will get better stuff but only when they learn at least the first 4 points I made in the previous post. Otherwise use the 600D to practice. If after practising and still can't understand the first 4 points then the direction of an upgrade will have to be a clever MFT or other clever mirrorless APS-C of sorts.

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  Reply # 1208894 6-Jan-2015 03:37
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Geektastic:
timmmay: Upgrading camera bodies will likely give marginal improvements.


Unless you move to Nikon, of course...! ;-)


u mean the new dSLRs with facial recognition and "3D" tracking on their -3EV 51-point phase detection with ADL auto exposure ... mmm ... *salivates* ...

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  Reply # 1209011 6-Jan-2015 10:16
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joker97:
Geektastic:
timmmay: Upgrading camera bodies will likely give marginal improvements.


Unless you move to Nikon, of course...! ;-)


u mean the new dSLRs with facial recognition and "3D" tracking on their -3EV 51-point phase detection with ADL auto exposure ... mmm ... *salivates* ...


The integration of key point recognition and active/predictive tracking is certainly going to be a game changer in the coming years.
Mirrorless is leading the way in these technologies, though fundamentally there's no reason why a lot of it couldn't be implemented in DSLRs.



I have no idea what the OP is trying to shoot, but if it's something like a cycle race, or a scooter following a set path, then perhaps selecting a wider depth of field aperture to get some leeway, and manually focussing on the road at the point of interest would be a technique worth trying also.  Set a fast shutter speed, bump up the ISO if required to expose at these settings (do Canon's do a TAv setting, where you pick shutter speed and aperture and the camera meters and adjusts the ISO within limits automatically?)  or do you have a 'scene' mode of fast/action setting?

Anyway, experiment and experiment some more with the gear you have.  And enjoy the experience.  If you have kids, set up a scooter 'race' track and set them off for 5 laps at a time.  It's summer, enjoy it :-)



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  Reply # 1209015 6-Jan-2015 10:23
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Jaxson:
joker97:
Geektastic:
timmmay: Upgrading camera bodies will likely give marginal improvements.


Unless you move to Nikon, of course...! ;-)


u mean the new dSLRs with facial recognition and "3D" tracking on their -3EV 51-point phase detection with ADL auto exposure ... mmm ... *salivates* ...


The integration of key point recognition and active/predictive tracking is certainly going to be a game changer in the coming years.
Mirrorless is leading the way in these technologies, though fundamentally there's no reason why a lot of it couldn't be implemented in DSLRs.



I have no idea what the OP is trying to shoot, but if it's something like a cycle race, or a scooter following a set path, then perhaps selecting a wider depth of field aperture to get some leeway, and manually focussing on the road at the point of interest would be a technique worth trying also.  Set a fast shutter speed, bump up the ISO if required to expose at these settings (do Canon's do a TAv setting, where you pick shutter speed and aperture and the camera meters and adjusts the ISO within limits automatically?)  or do you have a 'scene' mode of fast/action setting?

Anyway, experiment and experiment some more with the gear you have.  And enjoy the experience.  If you have kids, set up a scooter 'race' track and set them off for 5 laps at a time.  It's summer, enjoy it :-)

 

 

 

Thanks you. :)

 

It's mostly kid photos!

 

Some good tips to try.

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