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Mad Scientist
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  Reply # 1216876 18-Jan-2015 11:22
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and to add ... there are like 1% of the population who are actually blessed with near perfect bodies ... permutate that with the number of people in your photograph ... - never mind the composition and lighting

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  Reply # 1216890 18-Jan-2015 11:59
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It's an interesting dilemma re theft. I'm not a photographer, take plenty of cell phone pics but that's it. In fact the only reason I bought the N8 when it came out was for its camera. I take a lot of pictures of golf clubs, car parts and mountain bike parts, and have been surprised where they have popped up. I saw a picture of a Spoon exhaust (mufflers for Honda) appear in an online catalogue! However my view is anything I upload online in a forum is free game. Groups in Flickr I'd be more surprised at, especially given the quality of your pictures.

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  Reply # 1216913 18-Jan-2015 13:12
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freitasm:
The most interesting cases are the news ones. TV and content producers would have no problems complaining if you used their content but seems news sites media have no problems using someone else's images/footage when they can get these from Twitter, Facebook or Flickr - it's "news" and it seems they don't understand the concept of copyright.



http://www.med.govt.nz/business/intellectual-property/copyright/copyright-protection-in-new-zealand#exceptions

As far as them using images of people they find online copyright wise they just need permission from the person who took the photo, not the person in the photo.

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  Reply # 1216916 18-Jan-2015 13:15
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loceff13:
freitasm:
The most interesting cases are the news ones. TV and content producers would have no problems complaining if you used their content but seems news sites media have no problems using someone else's images/footage when they can get these from Twitter, Facebook or Flickr - it's "news" and it seems they don't understand the concept of copyright.



http://www.med.govt.nz/business/intellectual-property/copyright/copyright-protection-in-new-zealand#exceptions

As far as them using images of people they find online copyright wise they just need permission from the person who took the photo, not the person in the photo.


This just confirms the point I was making. The topic here is about content distribution without the permission from the photographer.







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  Reply # 1217117 18-Jan-2015 20:35
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TLD: One of our camera club members teaches a SeniorNet class, and she told her group about using Picasa to organize their pictures.  The next week one of the old ladies came in livid because Picasa had put pornographic pictures on her computer.  After a stunned silence, my friend asked if she was the only person who used the computer...    That lady's husband had some explaining to do when she got home! embarassed

I found the problem with my inappropriate uploads.  It was a flickr app I'd recently installed, and the default settings are to upload and share _everything_.  That tells you something about how folk use their pictures nowadays.

There is a photographer's adage:

A good photographer takes a hundred pictures and keeps ten.
A great photographer takes a hundred pictures and keeps one.

Apparently this applies very much to Andis Apse who ruthlessly culls out his second rate images.  Then he leaves them a few weeks, and goes through and culls out some more.

Probably the best speaker I've encountered at photographic conventions, is British landscape photographer Charlie Waite.  He said several things that have stayed with me and I try to adhere to, but he also told us about a meeting he had with a Brit wedding photographer.  Charlie asked the guy 'how many pictures he'd taken that he was _really_ happy with?'.  'About ten thousand' came the reply.  Either that person was the greatest undiscovered talent ever, or his standards were very low.

If you only show people your best pictures, you can trick them into thinking you are better than you really are.  BTW  I have maybe six images that I am really happy with out of the many thousands taken.


My 'guiding principal' regarding judging if photographs are 'good or bad':

 

 

It is not altogether wrong to say that there is no such thing as a bad photograph; Only less interesting, less relevant, less mysterious ones.

 

Susan Sontag: On Photography: The heroism of Vision (1977)

The context in which the the photography was taken and viewed is paramount IMHO.

A blurry photo of a family in their photo album is just as good as a 'technically perfect' photograph of the same family taken by a professional photographer.

IMHO if you 'have to' rely on everything being technically correct/perfect with your photographs, then you're not doing it right IMHO.



 


TLD



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  Reply # 1217123 18-Jan-2015 20:57
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Max makes some highly relevant points, but mostly on the worth of any particular image to the photographer.  Don Pittham gave an excellent talk at the 2014 PSNZ National here in Marlborough.  He spoke about precious photographs with memories of departed loved ones which, while being devoid of artistic merit, are still possibly the most precious images to the people concerned.  I expect we all have pictures like that.

As regards judging, I have often heard that the memories and emotions an image brings back to the person who took the picture, are 'usually' irrelevant from a competition POV, because the judge was not there, and knows nothing of the context.

Then there those interesting stories about how subtle cropping hugely changed the impact of an image, like the famous napalm girl picture.  The world saw the cropped version, but look how different the uncropped version is.  That soldier casually sorting out his cigarette (if that's what he is doing) changes the impact completely.





I have not decided what to do about my stolen images.  I'll contact the winery because that is blatant, but as for the rest...




Trevor Dennis
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  Reply # 1217213 18-Jan-2015 23:18
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Time to collect some copyright money.

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  Reply # 1217238 18-Jan-2015 23:58
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TLD: Max makes some highly relevant points, but mostly on the worth of any particular image to the photographer.  Don Pittham gave an excellent talk at the 2014 PSNZ National here in Marlborough.  He spoke about precious photographs with memories of departed loved ones which, while being devoid of artistic merit, are still possibly the most precious images to the people concerned.  I expect we all have pictures like that.

As regards judging, I have often heard that the memories and emotions an image brings back to the person who took the picture, are 'usually' irrelevant from a competition POV, because the judge was not there, and knows nothing of the context.

Then there those interesting stories about how subtle cropping hugely changed the impact of an image, like the famous napalm girl picture.  The world saw the cropped version, but look how different the uncropped version is.  That soldier casually sorting out his cigarette (if that's what he is doing) changes the impact completely.





I have not decided what to do about my stolen images.  I'll contact the winery because that is blatant, but as for the rest...


I recommend an excellent book about photo editing...

Pictures on a Page: Photo-journalism, Graphics and Picture Editing by Harold Evans. Most likely out of print, but I'm pretty sure most libraries will have a copy.

It has the above photo and the story about it being cropped and some of the reasons why it was.

There's another photo in the book from the Vietnam war. It shows a US soldier who has just got off the plane from Vietnam, running towards his family. Great publicity picture showing fit and healthy US military returning home safely. But it was a cropped photo, the original un-cropped photo showed he had dropped his crutches....

BTW the 'soldier' on the right was actually a Vietnamese UPI photographer, and he's reloading his camera.

http://www.bagnewsnotes.com/2013/09/have-you-ever-seen-the-uncropped-version-of-the-napalm-girl [/url]



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  Reply # 1223447 27-Jan-2015 18:53
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I don't care if people use my photos - for non profit making ventures.  If I wanted to make money out of photography, it would kill any enjoyment.  Some of my landscape photos are on Google Earth, I get requests from people who want to use them commercially, but decline.  For non-commercial use, no problem at all.

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  Reply # 1223448 27-Jan-2015 18:55
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where do you show off you photos?

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  Reply # 1223466 27-Jan-2015 19:12
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joker97: where do you show off you photos?


Me?
I've been posting landscape/scenery to Panoramio for a while, and a few other photos.  I used to be a bit antsy about posting higher resolution photos, but don't care any more, size limited by practical bandwidth/compression, UHDTV resolution is what I compromise to now, ie:
http://static.panoramio.com/photos/original/116160302.jpg

(low res version):


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