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  Reply # 1943511 19-Jan-2018 13:38
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scetoaux:

 

Just to clarify, my issue with this lies solely with the use of Facebook (the advertising company) as the delivery tool.  Surely we shouldn't be handing over other people's personal data to an advertising company before they are old enough to decide for themselves whether they wish to be part of it? 

 

So you would have no issue with a photo being published in print media, or online news - also "advertising" companies? 


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  Reply # 1943565 19-Jan-2018 14:46
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scuwp:

 

cebo:

 

I tend to agree with op, parents should be given the option.  At my school - I'm a teacher - parents are asked to give signed photo permission when their child starts school.  This covers facebook, newspapers etc.  Most parents are fine, but we have a few exceptions.  It's not a problem, we just have to be a bit careful with what we post. 

 

 

 

 

And why should 99.9% of parents miss out just because little [insert name here] happens to be in the same video/shot?  Borderline tin foil hat brigade.

 

 

 

 

No-one misses out, we just use one of the other photos or videos.  There's usually heaps from any given event.


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  Reply # 1943568 19-Jan-2018 14:49
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MurrayM:

 

cebo:

 

I tend to agree with op, parents should be given the option.  At my school - I'm a teacher - parents are asked to give signed photo permission when their child starts school.  This covers facebook, newspapers etc.  Most parents are fine, but we have a few exceptions.  It's not a problem, we just have to be a bit careful with what we post. 

 

 

Does this mean that for any photo that the school wants to put on FB someone has to look at the photo and identify each and every kid and then look up to see if that kid has a signed permission for them to be included in photos? I'm sure glad I'm not the staff member who has to upload the photos from your last sports day, where I imagine most photos have dozens of kids in them!

 

 

 

 

Yeah it does.  But we know who has permission or who doesn't.  It just isn't a problem.  I went to a sports event once where all the children without photo permission were given a wristband so that they could be identitified.  I think if the photo was used, their faces were blurred.




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  Reply # 1943577 19-Jan-2018 15:01

allan:

 

scetoaux:

 

Just to clarify, my issue with this lies solely with the use of Facebook (the advertising company) as the delivery tool.  Surely we shouldn't be handing over other people's personal data to an advertising company before they are old enough to decide for themselves whether they wish to be part of it? 

 

So you would have no issue with a photo being published in print media, or online news - also "advertising" companies? 

 

 

I'd certainly be less concerned.  A handful of articles on an ad-supported website or print publication are an entirely different proposition than a constant stream of other people's information being put into a Facebook page.


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  Reply # 1943588 19-Jan-2018 15:19
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scetoaux:

Just to clarify, my issue with this lies solely with the use of Facebook (the advertising company) as the delivery tool.  Surely we shouldn't be handing over other people's personal data to an advertising company before they are old enough to decide for themselves whether they wish to be part of it?



For my kids schools it’s all about the school interacting with the parents and possibly wider community. Kids at primary age should not have Facebook accounts and they use a closed social media software to engage with each other and post their own content. Advertising will change per individual account holder, unlike print media it will change endlessly.

Sounds like you would be best to ask your school to exclude your child from media.

Wow what a minefield schools have to deal with these days...no wonder there aren’t enough teachers.




Always be yourself, unless you can be Batman, then always be the Batman



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  Reply # 1943602 19-Jan-2018 15:39
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cebo:

 

MurrayM:

 

cebo:

 

I tend to agree with op, parents should be given the option.  At my school - I'm a teacher - parents are asked to give signed photo permission when their child starts school.  This covers facebook, newspapers etc.  Most parents are fine, but we have a few exceptions.  It's not a problem, we just have to be a bit careful with what we post. 

 

 

Does this mean that for any photo that the school wants to put on FB someone has to look at the photo and identify each and every kid and then look up to see if that kid has a signed permission for them to be included in photos? I'm sure glad I'm not the staff member who has to upload the photos from your last sports day, where I imagine most photos have dozens of kids in them!

 

 

Yeah it does.  But we know who has permission or who doesn't.  It just isn't a problem.  I went to a sports event once where all the children without photo permission were given a wristband so that they could be identitified.  I think if the photo was used, their faces were blurred.

 

 

Ah, the wristband idea would make it a lot easier.


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  Reply # 1944017 20-Jan-2018 14:46
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Schools having Facebook pages is becoming more common. Some schools (usually the larger schools especially high schools) use the minimally e.g. just to share announcements and the odd photos from big events such as prizegivings. One small intermediate school I worked at posted quite a lot of photos however the school had a close knit community who seem to appreciate it from the amount of 'likes' I observe on their posts.

 

As above the OP is entitled to voice her opinion and request her child be excluded. This is standard practice at every school I've worked in—it is likely the school already has such a list of children whose photograph is not to be shared outside the school via any media. Some schools have formal agreements between them and parents to specify exactly what the school is allowed and not allowed to do. This is something the OP could suggest to the school.




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  Reply # 1944185 20-Jan-2018 19:55

Thanks for the responses everyone, much appreciated.

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  Reply # 1944193 20-Jan-2018 21:01
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cebo: But we know who has permission or who doesn't.  It just isn't a problem.  I went to a sports event once where all the children without photo permission were given a wristband so that they could be identitified.  I think if the photo was used, their faces were blurred.



Thanks for that idea, definitely going to suggest it to our school too.

FWIW I’m also a teacher (primary) and we have between 8 and 12 kids on the ‘no photo’ list out of the 250-300. Its just something some few people care about more than others I guess?

Much more surprising (To me) are the two or three families who have to be given paper newsletter as they still don’t have email at their work, a pc in their home, or even a smartphone! 😳

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  Reply # 1944233 20-Jan-2018 23:05
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MurrayM:

 

Ah, the wristband idea would make it a lot easier.

 

 

May as well give them a burqa instead. Make them really get hassled by the other kids for having weirdo parents.

 

Do you really want to make life even harder for the kid with these requests?





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  Reply # 1944302 21-Jan-2018 10:26
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richms:

 

MurrayM:

 

Ah, the wristband idea would make it a lot easier.

 

 

May as well give them a burqa instead. Make them really get hassled by the other kids for having weirdo parents.

 

Do you really want to make life even harder for the kid with these requests?

 

 

Some of the kids will be excluded from media by their parents. Some by police or social workers including CYFS because of difficult family situations that are requiring careful management. This includes the kids being the victims of abuse in the past. Sometimes school is the best thing in a kid's life and I've yet to find a teacher so cold-hearted that they weren't aware of that.

 

 


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  Reply # 1944686 22-Jan-2018 11:46
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Facebook photos : what do FB's T&C's say

What rights do you, and FB have re photos of your kids .
Start with that .

 

Then consider, once uploaded , you loose control of photos of your kids . You have zero control of photos being
stolen off FB and used for whatever : other websites, used in advertising etc (it happens)

 

 


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