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Topic # 240901 1-Oct-2018 22:02
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Hi,

 

 

 

Just had Skinny Basic Fibre installed after waiting 8 months. Should be 30/10Mb/s (or 50/20 where I am in Wellington from what I read)

 

When I do the speed test that Skinny recommend on their website it automatically selects the Wellington Spark Server and I get something insane like 80down/15up. But if I change the server to the Auckland Spark Server I get 5down/15up. Yes, FIVE.

 

 

 

My question is, can't ISP's/Chorus just claim that speeds are high by opening up you speed to local hardware and then throttle you down to anywhere else on the Net that's actually useful. For instance, presumably if I want to download a movie on Netflix it will have to go through Auckland anyway* and so my real speed can be whatever they want to slow me down to, and all the while they can point to the speed to my local server and tell me that it's fast

 

 

 

?

 

 

 

Thanks,

 

Simon

 

 

 

*or through an overseas pipe


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'That VDSL Cat'
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  Reply # 2099673 1-Oct-2018 22:06
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Have you raised this as a fault to the skinny team?

 

 

 

the rates your getting seem to be inbetween profiles.. so i'd suspect your looking at wifi issues honestly...





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Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.


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  Reply # 2099677 1-Oct-2018 22:19
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Run a speedtest from http://fast.com it's the same servers that Netflix content are served from.

 

 


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  Reply # 2099678 1-Oct-2018 22:47
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Also can you verify for starters:

1) You're using Ethernet to conduct these tests.
2) You're not using a phone to do them and
3) You're using the Huawei HG659 router they provide?

Speedtests are in no way an indication of your internet speed. Test to the Spark or 2degrees Auckland servers via Ethernet. If it is still the same then log a fault with Skinny to investigate.





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  Reply # 2099688 2-Oct-2018 00:11
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SimonGilmour:

 

My question is, can't ISP's/Chorus just claim that speeds are high by opening up you speed to local hardware and then throttle you down to anywhere else on the Net that's actually useful. For instance, presumably if I want to download a movie on Netflix it will have to go through Auckland anyway* and so my real speed can be whatever they want to slow me down to, and all the while they can point to the speed to my local server and tell me that it's fast

 

*or through an overseas pipe

 

 

For the record, while it is technically possible for your suspect scenario to exist, there's no good commercial reason for any ISP to want to slow you down by such chicanery (a deception or trick particularly about legal issues) - it would be even more pointless when the Commerce Commission is actively monitoring and reporting on broadband performance. Instead, NZ ISPs (e.g. Voyager) do a lot of stuff like giving us faster access to Netflix by colocating Netflix appliances at their centres to avoid the traffic having to come from overseas.

 

That's probably why all the responses so far don't address your question and instead focus on diagnosing the size and the cause of the apparent difference in your reported bandwidth.


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