Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 
534 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #799119 14-Apr-2013 11:36
Send private message

Elpie:
stuzzo: 
The only circumstance where they might be likely to decline a wall insulation request would be something like brick veneer where the insulation would be likely to interfere with the drainage plain. In other cases, where you make an alteration you are generally required to bring the area up to current standards which might require adding building paper or other moisture barrier.


That had been my assumption before I was turned down. I wasn't expecting to have the application declined on a 1927 timber house, but it was. 


From what I gather, mainly from the Dept of Building and Housing guidance Doc on the subject that you quoted from earlier , the local authorities have discretion over whether a building consent for retrofit wall insulation is required or not so it may come down to the local opinions on the issue and also the climate in that area.

From my experience weatherboards rot because of either bulk water infiltration or defects in the outer surface that absorb moisture and decay over time. Insulation is unlikely to exacerbate either of these scenarios.

In my area a consent wasn't required but I was doing the work from the outside ie removing weatherboards, adding ply and building paper and a rainscreen in some areas, then reinstating or replacing weatherboards as appropriate. They were more interested, consent wise, if the work was done from the inside which I presume was related to the need to add a moisture barrier.

565 posts

Ultimate Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #799354 14-Apr-2013 22:46
Send private message

stuzzo:
Elpie:
stuzzo: 
The only circumstance where they might be likely to decline a wall insulation request would be something like brick veneer where the insulation would be likely to interfere with the drainage plain. In other cases, where you make an alteration you are generally required to bring the area up to current standards which might require adding building paper or other moisture barrier.


That had been my assumption before I was turned down. I wasn't expecting to have the application declined on a 1927 timber house, but it was. 


From what I gather, mainly from the Dept of Building and Housing guidance Doc on the subject that you quoted from earlier , the local authorities have discretion over whether a building consent for retrofit wall insulation is required or not so it may come down to the local opinions on the issue and also the climate in that area.

From my experience weatherboards rot because of either bulk water infiltration or defects in the outer surface that absorb moisture and decay over time. Insulation is unlikely to exacerbate either of these scenarios.

In my area a consent wasn't required but I was doing the work from the outside ie removing weatherboards, adding ply and building paper and a rainscreen in some areas, then reinstating or replacing weatherboards as appropriate. They were more interested, consent wise, if the work was done from the inside which I presume was related to the need to add a moisture barrier.


That's right, insulating an exterior wall will require building consent, unless the local authority has granted an exemption under Schedule 1(k) of the Building Act. I understand they can grant an exemption both in specific cases, and generally, such as Christchurch City Council's exemptions put in place to help with the earthquake rebuild. 

I'm no expert on this, but my understanding is that exterior wall insulation was one of the factors contributing to the leaky building crisis. The issue is that if water gets through the cladding, it can get absorbed by the insulation and, if it isn't able to dry, this can rot the wall framing. Councils may be nervous about granting consents for exterior insulation in older houses, because these houses generally do not have a cavity under the cladding, have untreated framing, and may not have building paper. I would expect that most of these retrofits will be done from the inside and, as you've pointed out, it is obviously much more difficult to effectively add building paper that way. In contrast, the multiple lines of defence created by your weatherboard / ply / building paper combination should be much lower risk.

Having said that, if the cladding is brick veneer (which does usually have a cavity between the cladding and framing) or something like bevelback weatherboards (which have some gaps between the cladding and framing allowing air circulation) then the local authority may be more inclined to grant the consent. The situation where they are likely to decline is where the building has direct fixed monolithic cladding, which tends to leak if not carefully maintained, and doesn't allow a lot of air flow for drying.



 
 
 
 


1408 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #801255 18-Apr-2013 00:16
Send private message

Coming into the convo a bit late here but our landlord has been really good.
We moved in here last October. 1940-50 house. Already had some insulation in it but they decided to get quotes and put more in as they acknowledged that it was a "cold" house.
Last week Premium insulation came along and put more insulation in both the ceiling and floor.
I noted some of the floor packaging and it was glass wool with an R value of 3.9.
Yes there is even a scientific basis on insulation look up Google on R values for insulation.
We also went round the house with the landlords permission and checked all window and door seals and purchased some strips and door seals for reimbursement by the landlord. Somehow I think she wants to keep us !!

As yet havnt noticed a lot of difference as its still quite warm here in Hamilton




GZMCC. Nokia Lumia 1020,Lenovo Yoga C640. 8 gb Ram and 256Gb SSD, Cam Am Spyder F3 LTD.  GoPro 5 Black,  Huawei P30 Pro,Huawei GT Smartwatch


1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic




News »

Freeview On Demand app launches on Sony Android TVs
Posted 6-Aug-2020 13:35


UFB hits more than one million connections
Posted 6-Aug-2020 09:42


D-Link A/NZ extends COVR Wi-Fi EasyMesh System series with new three-pack
Posted 4-Aug-2020 15:01


New Zealand software Rfider tracks coffee from Colombia all the way to New Zealand businesses
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:35


Logitech G launches Pro X Wireless gaming headset
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:21


Sony Alpha 7S III provides supreme imaging performance
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:11


Sony introduces first CFexpress Type A memory card
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:05


Marsello acquires Goody consolidating online and in-store marketing position
Posted 30-Jul-2020 16:26


Fonterra first major customer for Microsoft's New Zealand datacentre
Posted 30-Jul-2020 08:07


Everything we learnt at the IBM Cloud Forum 2020
Posted 29-Jul-2020 14:45


Dropbox launches native HelloSign workflow and data residency in Australia
Posted 29-Jul-2020 12:48


Spark launches 5G in Palmerston North
Posted 29-Jul-2020 09:50


Lenovo brings speed and smarter features to new 5G mobile gaming phone
Posted 28-Jul-2020 22:00


Withings raises $60 million to enable bridge between patients and healthcare
Posted 28-Jul-2020 21:51


QNAP integrates Catalyst Cloud Object Storage into Hybrid Backup solution
Posted 28-Jul-2020 21:40



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.