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neb

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  Reply # 2003148 26-Apr-2018 22:16
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DarthKermit:

As a house warming gift, my mum got us an Bunnings Homelite electric lawn mower in 2009. After eight years it conked out. I opened it up and found the carbon brushes were very worn down. Turns out it's impossible to get any kind of spare parts for these Bunnings sold mowers.

 

 

Carbon brushes in general are a pain, I've only ever bought one tool that had replacement brushes, surprisingly a cheap Chinese Dremel clone. Rule of thumb for these things, if there's sparking it's the brushes, if there's intermittent operation and/or decreased power and concussive therapy (shaking/slapping it) helps it's the brushes.

 

 

As for replacing them, search eBay for your brush based on dimensions, it's usually a couple of dollars for a set of ten or so, and there's literally thousands of them available from various sellers.



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  Reply # 2010223 8-May-2018 18:52
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And another project underway for the forthcoming winter:

 

Our back and front lawns both get quite boggy during winter. I've finally got a drainage project started.

 

Click to see full size

 

I've dug a trench by the back path next to the house and am going to put a length of perforated pipe surrounded by stones in there. This will drain into the sump in the foreground.

 

Next, I'll put another length of pipe across the same lawn a few metres further up the lawn. We're lucky there's some slope in the lawn to help with drainage.


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  Reply # 2013966 11-May-2018 11:53
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DarthKermit:

 

And another project underway for the forthcoming winter:

 

Our back and front lawns both get quite boggy during winter. I've finally got a drainage project started.

 

Click to see full size

 

I've dug a trench by the back path next to the house and am going to put a length of perforated pipe surrounded by stones in there. This will drain into the sump in the foreground.

 

Next, I'll put another length of pipe across the same lawn a few metres further up the lawn. We're lucky there's some slope in the lawn to help with drainage.

 

 

Does the council allow dumping of drainage into the sump? I'm surprised there aren't rules around that. there are cases in chch where permissions are denied as water will go into sumps / drainage etc.

 

 





nunz

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  Reply # 2013980 11-May-2018 12:21
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The sump is part of the local system. It is usually required to separate out any silt and gravel before the water goes into the stormwater (not sewerage). It would be the onward connection from the sump that the Council might regulate.

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Chorus

  Reply # 2013990 11-May-2018 12:43
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Torquenstein:

 

Built some wood storage to get ready for winter since we put in a fireplace last September.

 

Click to see full size

 

Click to see full size

 

 

 

 

Jeeze, someone paid attention in woodworking class! Others of us, (ie ME) resort to some old shipping pallets and my trusty nail gun lol

 

Click to see full size

 

Click to see full size

 

 




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  Reply # 2017269 17-May-2018 04:25
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nunz:

 

Does the council allow dumping of drainage into the sump? I'm surprised there aren't rules around that. there are cases in chch where permissions are denied as water will go into sumps / drainage etc.

 

 

No idea sorry. I put that sump in previously when I was doing another drainage project. I'm simply extending the drain system to pick up the water in the back lawn.

 

 

 

Existing sump with a new connection added (the pipe at the top of the picture):

 

Click to see full size

 

Perforated pipe (on left) with filter sock over it to prevent it being blocked by silt:

 

Click to see full size

 

Click to see full size

 

Pipes covered with stones:

 

Click to see full size

 

The top ~ 100 mm will be covered over with dirt.


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  Reply # 2017628 17-May-2018 13:21
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You will still get fine sediment coming through the sock, but the main thing is that the outlet of your sump is above the bottom so that sediment will accumulate in the sump instead of going into council drains. Idea is that you scoop out the sediment every now and then to keep it below the outlet.



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  Reply # 2031390 7-Jun-2018 12:38
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A sump to be installed for my drainage project:

 

Click to see full size

 

I've taped polystyrene to the sump side. I may extend the drain further. With the polystyrene there, it guarantees no concrete will cover that side of the sump when I concrete it in place. Later I can dig down beside the sump and drill a hole through the polystyrene and sump wall to install an additional connection. smile




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  Reply # 2038520 16-Jun-2018 10:05
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Our 1950's house has fixed louvre vents at both ends of the attic. One facing north north west and the other south south east.

 

Due to their design and depending on which way the rain hits the house, water tends to get in and leaks down. I fixed the NNW one with a custom made flashing a few years ago (so much water had gotten in over the years that several of the attic studs and dwangs had rotted). Now I've finally fixed the SSE one also.

 

This is the bottom edge of the existing wooden louvre. They're made of rimu and the problem with this design is water can penetrate into the gaps between the side board and the bottom board (the bottom board slopes down at 45 degrees). In this photo, I forced the two side boards apart with a car jack so I could cut the nails holding them to the bottom board with a hacksaw blade:

 

Click to see full size

 

I made a flashing out of an old aluminum oven tray I had lying around:

 

Click to see full size

 

I cut the lowest part of both of the side boards completely off so the flashing would slot in below them and catch any water that drips down. This one piece design means there are no gaps or holes at all for any water to leak through. All water is captured by the flashing and it extends out past the stucco wall of the house by about 50 mm to allow water to drip away from the house.

 

Here's the flashing installed:

 

Click to see full size

 

You can see where I cut away the side boards and the remains of the old lower board. The plywood on the left is a piece of tanalised ply I'm about to screw in place to ensure the flashing stays fixed (I didn't want to make any holes in the flashing).


Glurp
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  Reply # 2038573 16-Jun-2018 11:16
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Very creative.

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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  Reply # 2038646 16-Jun-2018 13:28
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Wheelbarrow01:

 

Torquenstein:

 

Built some wood storage to get ready for winter since we put in a fireplace last September.

 

Click to see full size

 

Click to see full size

 

 

 

 

Jeeze, someone paid attention in woodworking class! Others of us, (ie ME) resort to some old shipping pallets and my trusty nail gun lol

 

Click to see full size

 

Click to see full size

 

 

 

 

Dammit @Torquenstein - my wife saw your efforts and now I'm on the hook for some firewood shelters that look as good as yours. .. Just kidding. Nice job. One question: The bottom where the two hexagons meet rests on a point. Does that tend to split or pull away with the pressure on the walls pushing sideways? Have you considered making a triangle brace to slip into the gap and two sides?

 

@wheelbarrow1 - Im a bit more of your school of thought - running some pallet workshops soon. Do you mind if i show your efforts off as an example? Also did you cross brace the back with another pallet to stop the shelter leaning sideways?

 

 

 

I often make things from wooden palings but we have been getting pallets with Indonesian hardwoods in them. They make beautiful wood to work with (made table tops etc) and the beams are so strong - or they make incredible firewood.  The fence palings are cheap and as long as you use 19mm or 25mm thick stuff dont bow too badly. @wheelbarrow1 - what wood did you use for the side of shed two?





nunz

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  Reply # 2059412 20-Jul-2018 16:08
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Hi guys,

 

I wonder if anyone knows the best place to purchase Galvanised Pipes (20mm - 400mm) + Flanges. Or my best option is bunnings? 

 

I'm planning to do 

 

 

but single level as TV stand for now. maybe later add more levels on the side/s.





helping others at evgenyk.nz


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  Reply # 2059423 20-Jul-2018 16:21
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Steel and tube will see direct. They have galv stuff and probably flanges too. Otherwise your engineering supply type stores will have those fittings - they look similar to scaffolding fittings.

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  Reply # 2059617 20-Jul-2018 19:36
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Bunnings isn't cheap.

https://www.bunnings.co.nz/search/products?q=galvanised&redirectFrom=Any&facets=CategoryIdPath%3Dcd1beca9-86df-4683-9953-5fbb73e1cf13%20%3E%203127afac-dbd5-44c6-979c-9087093b2fd9

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  Reply # 2059619 20-Jul-2018 19:41
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flanges and elbows were way cheaper on aliexpress when I was looking at that for a friend. They backed out before we ordered anything tho as his missus is indecisive.





Richard rich.ms

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