Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.
Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 
398 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 163


  Reply # 848690 3-Jul-2013 12:32
Send private message

My butcher cuts my steaks to my requirements - so a thicker scotch for me (about 2 fingers) a more more normal sized one for my partner.  I like mine rarer than she does, so they get cooked for the same amount of time, 2-3 mins per side with standing

The other excellent cut is rib eye on the bone.  Get a nice thick cut (800gm or so steak) and cook it as a steak for two, slicing at the table ...mmmmm

2484 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 535
Inactive user


  Reply # 848691 3-Jul-2013 12:32
Send private message

networkn:
dickytim: I personally rank steaks as follows

Sirloin
Ribeye
Rump
Tenderloin

Generally when I cook my steak you don't need a knife to cut it.

The secret is how you prepare then cook it.

Firstly I do salt and pepper the steak before sealing it then seal in butter, about 3-4min a side, from there put it in the oven on a pre-heated tray about 7 min a side and turn.

I generally don't rest my steaks, but I am yet to taste a better steak in a resteraunt.

BTW I wont order a steak in a steakhouse, they generally don't cook them very well and I see it as a waste of good meat, especially one that shares its name with Texas' nickname.

Also a good tip is that the mad butcher does "man cut" steaks and if you know what to look for you can get some exceptionally good cuts.


3-4 Minutes each side AND 7 minutes in the oven!? How thick are those steaks?


350-400G sirloins usually.

The oven doesn't cook the same way as the pan, and you don't seal at full temperature for the whole 3-4 min.

With my method you get a med-med well steak that is extremely tender and tastes better that any other way of cooking it.

3282 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 208

Trusted

  Reply # 848700 3-Jul-2013 12:55
Send private message

trig42:
networkn: 3-4 Minutes each side AND 7 minutes in the oven!? How thick are those steaks?

And he says 7 minutes a side.
They must come out like Tyres.
Unless it is a really massive steak.

I thought the same thing, but was too polite to mention it... ;)

17574 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 5058

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 848706 3-Jul-2013 13:13
One person supports this post
Send private message

dickytim:
networkn:
dickytim: I personally rank steaks as follows

Sirloin
Ribeye
Rump
Tenderloin

Generally when I cook my steak you don't need a knife to cut it.

The secret is how you prepare then cook it.

Firstly I do salt and pepper the steak before sealing it then seal in butter, about 3-4min a side, from there put it in the oven on a pre-heated tray about 7 min a side and turn.

I generally don't rest my steaks, but I am yet to taste a better steak in a resteraunt.

BTW I wont order a steak in a steakhouse, they generally don't cook them very well and I see it as a waste of good meat, especially one that shares its name with Texas' nickname.

Also a good tip is that the mad butcher does "man cut" steaks and if you know what to look for you can get some exceptionally good cuts.


3-4 Minutes each side AND 7 minutes in the oven!? How thick are those steaks?


350-400G sirloins usually.

The oven doesn't cook the same way as the pan, and you don't seal at full temperature for the whole 3-4 min.

With my method you get a med-med well steak that is extremely tender and tastes better that any other way of cooking it.


I am just checking that you mean the same type of steak I am...

http://preview.tinyurl.com/pw7eugk

I am sceptical, but not unwilling to be wrong, I'd really like to hear more specifics about the cooking method. Everything in my body is telling me that would be boot leather after 8 minutes in the pan and 14 in the oven, but like I said, I'd love to be wrong so I can have a go myself.

Also I guess I wouldn't cook my steak to med-well ever, so I can see how some of the extra time is different to me who wants med-rare, but still. 

Also I guess at 400Grams (I presume you mean each) there would be some extra time.




1221 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 123


  Reply # 848725 3-Jul-2013 13:23
Send private message

trig42:
jarledb: This is the trick to get a perfect steak: http://www.breville.co.nz/cooking-appliances/sous-vide.html - long cooked to just the right core temperature, and then seared before serving to get the nice crust on it as well.

A tip I got from a wedding caterer -

A whole eye fillet, seasoned and seared really well, then put into a standard oven at as low as it will go (70 degrees C - he said 67, but I have done it at 70-75) for about 4 hours.
You will check on the meat and it will feel and look like it is not cooking (weird).

Take the meat out, rest for 20-30 minutes and slice into steaks. It will be perfectly rare, but not bleeding and you will be able to cut it with the back of a spoon. Awesome.

We have also used the same method with Bolar Roast, Rump and Topside roast. Perfect.
Will not work with scotch fillet I don't think - the vein of Fat running through will not break down/render. Should work with a lump of Sirloin, so long as the strip of fat is well seared before putting in the oven.


That's likely to be connective tissue, which wont render to gelatine so well.  Basically what you are doing is roughly slow cooking. If you cover it in a pot with a little moisture and slow cook it, this is called braising.




Software Engineer

 


Banana?
4361 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1030

Subscriber

  Reply # 848746 3-Jul-2013 13:37
Send private message

Yeah, it is slow cooking, but with a piece of meat best suited to fast cooking (much like a sous-vide does).

The meat comes out red, but there is no blood, and it is very tender. If you braised a piece of Eye Fillet, I imagine it would dry up and be quite tasteless.

1221 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 123


  Reply # 848800 3-Jul-2013 15:11
Send private message

trig42: Yeah, it is slow cooking, but with a piece of meat best suited to fast cooking (much like a sous-vide does).

The meat comes out red, but there is no blood, and it is very tender. If you braised a piece of Eye Fillet, I imagine it would dry up and be quite tasteless.


It should only dry up [when braising] if it is under-cooked as the meat hasn't had time to relax again during the cooking phase (it reabsorbs the moisture).





Software Engineer

 


2484 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 535
Inactive user


  Reply # 849038 4-Jul-2013 07:01
Send private message

TwoSeven:
trig42:
jarledb: This is the trick to get a perfect steak: http://www.breville.co.nz/cooking-appliances/sous-vide.html - long cooked to just the right core temperature, and then seared before serving to get the nice crust on it as well.

A tip I got from a wedding caterer -

A whole eye fillet, seasoned and seared really well, then put into a standard oven at as low as it will go (70 degrees C - he said 67, but I have done it at 70-75) for about 4 hours.
You will check on the meat and it will feel and look like it is not cooking (weird).

Take the meat out, rest for 20-30 minutes and slice into steaks. It will be perfectly rare, but not bleeding and you will be able to cut it with the back of a spoon. Awesome.

We have also used the same method with Bolar Roast, Rump and Topside roast. Perfect.
Will not work with scotch fillet I don't think - the vein of Fat running through will not break down/render. Should work with a lump of Sirloin, so long as the strip of fat is well seared before putting in the oven.


That's likely to be connective tissue, which wont render to gelatine so well.  Basically what you are doing is roughly slow cooking. If you cover it in a pot with a little moisture and slow cook it, this is called braising.


The pan is used to initially seal the steak, then you turn it down until you are ready to turn the steak, then you heat the pan some more, finishing the steak in the oven actually acts like roasting it and renders down all the fat while cooking the steak thru. Yes this is the steak that I am referring to however mine would generally be better aged (darker) and a lot more marbled, if I can help it I use home kill but it has been a while since we did one, and the steer was a pet so I refuse to eat it.

1 | 2 | 3 
Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic

Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Intel introduces new NUC kits and NUC mini PCs
Posted 16-Aug-2018 11:03


The Warehouse leaps into the AI future with Google
Posted 15-Aug-2018 17:56


Targus set sights on enterprise and consumer growth in New Zealand
Posted 13-Aug-2018 13:47


Huawei to distribute nova 3i in New Zealand
Posted 9-Aug-2018 16:23


Home robot Vector to be available in New Zealand stores
Posted 9-Aug-2018 14:47


Panasonic announces new 2018 OLED TV line up
Posted 7-Aug-2018 16:38


Kordia completes first live 4K TV broadcast
Posted 1-Aug-2018 13:00


Schools get safer and smarter internet with Managed Network Upgrade
Posted 30-Jul-2018 20:01


DNC wants a safer .nz in the coming year
Posted 26-Jul-2018 16:08


Auldhouse becomes an AWS Authorised Training Delivery Partner in New Zealand
Posted 26-Jul-2018 15:55


Rakuten Kobo launches Kobo Clara HD entry level reader
Posted 26-Jul-2018 15:44


Kiwi team reaches semi-finals at the Microsoft Imagine Cup
Posted 26-Jul-2018 15:38


KidsCan App to Help Kiwi Children in Need
Posted 26-Jul-2018 15:32


FUJIFILM announces new high-performance lenses
Posted 24-Jul-2018 14:57


New FUJIFILM XF10 introduces square mode for Instagram sharing
Posted 24-Jul-2018 14:44



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.